The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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josswinn's picture
josswinn

First 100% Rye Sourdough, OK on the outside, hollow on the inside.

Hello, 


My first post here and my first 100% Rye Sourdough. It's a failure and I'm wondering why. I followed Andrew Whitley's directions in Bread Matters (p. 165). Everything seemed to go according to plan from making the starter to the 12hr proof. But on taking it (actually, I made two - both came out the same) out of the oven, the inside of the loaf was as you see below. Where did I go wrong? Thanks for any suggestions.


100% Rye Sourdough - Rubbish!

mido_mijo's picture
mido_mijo

Baking Stones - Glaze in tiles

I bought some tiles at Lowes, and the employee there showed me some unglazed tiles that he would recommend for baking. But since he didn't have any experience or people asking him, I searched online for some info on the tiles.


 


So far I found out an answer to my question.


 


Do I need to seal the Rialto, Botticino, Positano or Murano series tiles carried at Lowe's?
No. During production process there is glaze incorporated in the mixture to help prevent stains.


http://www.delconcausa.com/lowes/faqs.htm


 


So does this mean it's not safe to bake on since there's glaze incorporated into the tile mixture?


 


Thanks in advance.

gauri's picture
gauri

Struggling with whole wheat bread in India!

Hi,


I've been browsing the site for a while now, but after my n-th not very good whole wheat loaf, I'm writing to check if anyone can please give me some pointers on where I'm going wrong! Basically, my bread bakes up quite dense, and it nearly does not rise at all in the oven.


I have tried Peter Reinhart's 100% whole wheat recipe. Some changes I made were


- I use the regular atta that we use for chappatis at home. We get the wheat ground ourselves. But I do not know if the wheat is hard or soft.


- I seem to end up using a lot more flour (nearly 1/2 cup more in today's loaf) since the dough kept sticking to the work surface. I'd knead it and put it on the counter, and it would start sticking. I can keep wetting my hands and kneading it (like I do for chappati dough) but I'm afraid I might get too much liquid into the dough.


- I use buttermilk for the soaker, but its nearly 40 degrees C here (in Ahmedabad) and I can leave the soaker out only for about four hours before it begins to get sour.


- The risen dough always has tiny holes all over the surface. Am I letting it rise too long?


- I have a little oven (of about 34 L capacity) that we keep on the counter top.


If anyone can suggests anything that I doing obviosuly wrong, please do let me know. I'd like to know if I can get a better crumb without adding any other ingredient to the list.


Thanks a lot. Would appreciate any help!

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Pain au Levain+Semolina Sourdough from "Bread", and some semolina pasta

Pain au Levain, delicate, well balanced flavor. Not sour at all. DH loved it, I prefer it a bit more sour. Borrowed this shape from SteveB's blog here



Another shape:



Nice open crumb, for a 65% dough, it's surprisingly open:



 


Now the semolina Sourdough, pretty straightforward formula, the dough indeed rose pretty fast just like the instruction says



I didn't mix sesame into the dough, put them on the surface instead. The shape is from "Amy's Bread". I like how the seam opened up during baking, and sesame got seperated on either side.



Open crumb, but holes are mostly distributed on the outside, probably due to the swirl shape



Made semolina pasta to go with the semolina sourdough above



With homemade pesto sauce & a generous piece of salmon, yum!




 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The best baking show ever broadcast

You have to be "of a certain age" to have seen the best baking show ever broadcast. It was a demonstration of making a Banana Cream Pie by Marshall Efron, an episode of The Great American Dream Machine broadcast on PBS in 1971.


I've thought of this landmark broadcast many times over the years and wished I could view it again. Well, I found it this evening, and I want to share it with you all. 



Marshall Efon - Better Living through Chemistry


Enjoy!


David

Avie93309's picture
Avie93309

My 1st Pugliese

Been looking forward to make this bread. Finally got my Durum Flour in the mail (not available at local stores). Followed the recipe from Rose Beranbaum's The Bread Bible. Flour (bread:67%, durum 33%), Water 80.4%, Yeast .79%, Salt 2.2%.


Biga: 75 g Flour, Instant Yeast 1/16 tsp, water 59 g, optional: Malt Powder 1/2 tsp.


Worried that I totally ruined the dough. I allowed the biga to ferment in a cool area for 24 hrs (recommended @ 55-65 F). I thought my storage room is that cool. When I checked the room temp it was 72%.


Baked on stone: 5 mins @ 500 F; 20 mins @ 450, turned half way thru. Internal Temp. Target: 205 F, Actual 200 F.


PeterPiper's picture
PeterPiper

Crackly crust - finally!

I've been working on my sourdough bread for a while and finally got the really crackly crust I wanted.  I've read to leave the bread in the oven after it bakes for another few minutes while it cools down, but I guess I wasn't leaving it long enough.  Yesterday I got distracted and left it in there for almost 15 minutes with the door ajar.  The crust came out really cracked and crispy and still the inside was chewy and not dried out.  I'm guessing at some point, maybe around ten minutes, the cooked loaf isn't venting any more steam and the crust can really dry out.  This isn't the method I'd use for sandwich bread, but for a really crispy bread to soak up pan juices or dip in olive oil, it can't be beat!


-Peter


http://psoutowood.wordpress.com


 


Sourdough with crisp crust

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Dolceaqua bread

 


I wanted to share these pictures of the bread being sold in a stand in Dolceaqua, Italy.  It was a small festival displaying the products of Dolceaqua. The size of the bread was amazing. Imagine the size of the ovens. 


 



 


jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Nonya Rice Dumpling, an asian delicacy

Without going through the practice of making bread and everything,  I wouldn't have attempted this. As this delicacy requires techniques as complex as making a baguette,  and patience that is required in making sourdoughs.


This is to share with you here a different type of food we make in Asia.  The Nonya Rice Dumpling.  To share with you on how it looks as some of you may have read my blog mentioned under Vermont Sourdough.  It is not baked but boiled for 2.5 hours submerged in water. 


 




overnight baker's picture
overnight baker

What sort of malt?

I am trying to follow a bagel recipe and it asks for 1 tbs of "Diastic malt, either liquid or dry" and "Malt syrup, honey or sugar for boiling.


So I've scoured my local shops and I've managed to find a product called spraymalt in a brewing supplies store and malt extract from a health food shop (more detail below).


I'm happy to just throw in the malt extra where it asks for malt syrup as it can't be super critical if it suggests you can use honey or sugar. With the diastic malt however my (basic) understanding so far is that it has enzymes in it an that these might be important in producing bagels distinctive taste and texture.


Does anyone know whether either of the products I have found are likely to be 'diastic' and if not what difference that will make to my bagels?


 


Here's the blurb from the packet/jar:


 



SPRAYMALT MEDIUM. Rich malt flavour, ideal for bitters. Boosts the beer's natural body and results in a more rounded, mellow note to the final brew.


Use as a direct replacement for sugar in your brewing - lb for lb. Simply pour the sachet contents on to the beer kit extract in your fermenter and carry on brewing in the usual way.


Muntons Spraymalts are made using the finest premium malts, spray-dried into a fine soluble powder. This process is deisgned to retain all of the malt flavour, without imparting any burnt, off flavours. Spraymalts are ideal additions to any recipe, adding extra malt sugars and a delicious malt flavour.


Ingredients: Barley malt extract (from 100% malting barley)



 



HOLLAND & BARRET MALT EXTRACT


Traditional English Malt Extract. Delicios in baking, on toast or over cereals.


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