The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

My 1st Attempt at Marble Rye

Ok so she is just out of the oven so I can not show the crumb yet but I will edit later to include crumb.

the two doughs

rolled out and ready to create "one loaf to rule them all!" Sorry geeked out there for second....

Time for her to sleep.....

Arise sweet one

Edit: the crumb

Cheers,

Wingnut

ok one more picture.......

Greg D's picture
Greg D

Looks Like Wonder Bread??

One of my family members absolutely refuses to eat bread that does not look and feel exactly like the bread that the majority of his 2nd grade buddies eat at at lunch every day.  In his words, "I don't want that seedy stuff like you make, I just want real bread."  I just purchased a pullman loaf pan and lid in the hope of baking some sort of basic white bread that can pass his rigid requirements.  Disregarding the political and "healthy lifestyle teaching moment" issues, can anybody direct me to a good formula for basic white sandwich bread that bakes well in a pullman loaf pan and which looks as much as possible like the store-bought cotton wool stuff his classmates eat?

Happy Baking!

pipo1000's picture
pipo1000

Lame / Scoring Tool for sale

We at Weekend Bakery like to share with you our brand new lame ;

This lame or bread scoring tool, exclusively manufactured for Weekend Bakery, is made of wood and stainless steel. It comes with a very high quality blade and instructions on how to use it properly. It was designed by us because we could not find a lame to our liking anywhere. So we designed one that is lightweight, easy to handle and with a removable blade. You can place the blade in the right angle and you can use all four edges of the blade before you need to replace it.

You can buy this lame at our webshop http://www.weekendbakery.com/webshop/en/28-bread-scoring-tool-lame.html

The worldwide shipping cost for one lame in an envelope is 3,50 euro.

Thank you for your time,

Ed & Marieke
http://www.weekendbakery.com/

 

Ghobz's picture
Ghobz

Levain Quantities in Ken Forkish's "Flour Water Salt Yeast"

I'm planning to make Ken Forkish's Overnight Country Blonde from his book "Flour Water Salt Yeast" tomorrow. I got the book today and I can't wait to try the 1.8 kg boule version.

He instructs to prepare about 1kg levain to make a bread that requires only 216 g. Granted, it's an easy fix. I'll just scale down to 1/4 his levain quantities.

Since I'm borderline obsessive-compulsive, I went back and read the chapter on levain, which I skiped entirely when I first was perusing through the book. In that chapter he suggests scaling down his 80% hydration levain formula, giving weights to pare down to half the amount as an example.

Still, why on the bread formulas' pages, after bringing attention on how he modified his instructions, techniques and quantities to accomodate for the home baker at several occasions in the preceeding chapters,  instruct to prepare a 1 kg batch of levain for a bread that requires 216 g of it (or even 360 g in other formulas in the book)? Am I missing something?

 

 

 

 

Aminax's picture
Aminax

Of Bread & Personal History

My love for bread, cooking in general, and gardening centers around one, important person in my life. I am fully willing to admit that, at least when it comes to Mamo (my maternal grandmother), my memory may be a tad biased. With that said, if I were to describe Mamo (pronounced "ma'am-moe"), I would certainly include the words intelligent, beautiful, capable, and even superhero. She sewed, gardened, baked, cooked, and cleaned in her spare time. She worked as a secretary for an incredibly successful real estate broker in my hometown of Arlington, TX. I realize that the title 'secretary' has negative connotations for some, but Mamo was very good at and proud of the work she did. Her boss suffered from Parkinson's Disease, and I got the impression that she took on more and more of the responsibilities of keeping his business running as he succumbed to the inevitable symptoms of the ailment. She even earned and held her own real estate license. Although now, as an adult, I wish I had paid more attention to her, and spent more time with her and learning from her;  she died suddenly while I was in my snotty, too-cool-for-family, adolescent stage.

Her kitchen was simply a haven. The wallpaper had a pattern that included pussywillows, and the counters were a sunny yellow. I tasted many "firsts" at the small, glass-top table at the kitchen's center; including two of my favorite foods of all time: crab legs & pickled okra. Many casual dinners, board games, holiday meals, conversations, and other memories took place at that table. Hunger overcame me anytime I stepped foot onto that vinyl floor.

Whether it was a gift related to Christmas or her birthday, or "just because" I don't recall, but I clearly remember her getting a bread machine, and the excitement and enthusiasm she expressed while learning to use it. It caused some frustrations in the beginning, if I remember correctly, but she never gave up. The baked goods that came out of that machine were delicious, and I probably had more than my fair share of "tastings".

To date and not counting quick breads, I can count the number of loaves I have baked on one hand. The very first attempt resulted in a very dense white bread. I cannot overstate how dense those first, two loaves were. As I type this I am on the verge of laughing because I was under the impression that if I had to cram all the flour the recipe suggested into the dough. I also didn't have the slightest clue about kneading or getting air into the dough, etc. A more detailed account of my first attempt may be good enough material to warrant its own blog entry. For now, I will simply say it was clumsy and messy.

Some hobbies remain just that: activities done in our free time for pleasure. Now and then, we try a new activity on which we are instantly hooked. Each session with this "hobby" is an attempt to improve our skills or broaden what we know. We find ourselves wishing we had more time to devote to this activity; perhaps we even daydream of ways to do so. We're never quite sure when exactly the hobby became a passion (or maybe even an obsession). This is what bread has become for me.

greedybread's picture
greedybread

Back to the Yeasty Beasty! Frittelle anyone?

Si, si, si per favore!!  I have to say these little beauties (in general) are gorgeous and so easy to make .

The ones in Venezia are sublime, especially the ones with the pastry creme in them.

Heavenly.

I have seen other variations throughout Italy but i didn't take much notice at the time:(  They were selling something similar at night in Siena at the odd stall around the city.

Not at Palio time, in winter.......

So this my Frittelle friends, is what we are aiming for!!

Assorted Frittelle mmmmmm

Lets get Yeasty!!

Fritelle dough

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of flour, I used strong bread
  • 1/2 cup of castor sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 & 3/4 cup milk
  • 2 Tbsp dried yeast
  • 6-8 cups oil  for frying err preferably NOT fat.
  • 1  jar Nutella err, not quite as large as this one in my photo!!
  • 2 tsp cinnamon for garnishing
  • 1 cup castor sugar for garnishing
  • A big Beasty!!

Method:

  • In a bowl warm half the milk, add in the sugar to warmed milk until dissolved
  •  Stir in the yeast.
  • Leave in warm place until creamy/frothy.
  • Place all dry ingredients in a bowl, flour and salt.
  •  Stir the eggs and half of the milk together and add it to the flour mixture a little at a time.
  •  Add the yeasty mixture to the flour mixture and stir until all the ingredients are combined.
  •  The dough will be wet and sticky. Don't be alarmed!!
  • Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let rise for about 5 hours when it should have doubled in size.
Pour that Oil in!!

On the matter of oil, my husband and I have often debated getting a mini fryer. He says no, we would put on 5-10 kgs in a VERY short time and sadly i think it is true but then when i make something like this, doughnuts, beignets or deep-fried ice cream balls, then we have this huge pot of oil (which i will filter) which will be on the stove for a while until its used. When I cook, i like to use olive oil but sadly the cost of filling a pot with olive oil would make the cost of the frittelle astronomical! The kids use the oil and make chips a few times (but that for them is LABOUR intensive) and i will slowly chip away at it but i do wonder, " mini fryer"? Would be easier and i could just pop it in the cupboard. Hmmm, more pondering maybe?

Hmmm wondering???

Back to the dough:

  • Prepare the sugar and cinnamon mix on a large plate.
  • When the dough is ready, stir it again. It should be sticky. If it's not, add a little more milk.
  • In a heavy pot for frying, heat the oil . I don't have a thermometer but i usually test the heat by putting a wee piece of raw food in it. My granddad used to spit in the oil!!
  •  Spoon the dough batter into the oil. I used a tablespoon but the original recipe used an ice cream scoop. Not plastic obviously!!
  • Fry until the frittelle are cooked through, about 5 minutes. I like to turn them over with tongs. They brown pretty quickly. Don't overcrowd your pot as they will take longer to cook .
  • Remove the frittelle with a slotted spoon and place on a plate covered with paper towels to drain.
  •  Once drained, quickly roll them in the sugar.
  • Poke a hole in the frittelle and fill a pastry bag fitted with a tip with Nutella and pipe Nutella into each frittelle.
  • Best eaten when warm.
  • Don't forget the most important thing!! Enjoy, enjoy and enjoy!!
yummmm
Almost all gone
filled with Nutella

P.S : You can easily insert other delights into these, white chocolate, milk chocolate, jam, pastry creme, cream, moro bars err perhaps not cream,  the list is endless........But things that hold shape and have some heat resistant are probably better. My son seemed to think jelly lollies would be nice!! I don't think so............You could,  if you were really adventurous, make it a savoury recipe but that we will look at another day :)

Frittelle how i love thee!!

Recipe adapted from Luscious Lucca Blog @ i love Lucca tours  

http://greedybread.wordpress.com/2012/05/31/back-to-the-yeasty-beasty-frittelle-anyone/

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD Altamura - Not The Priest's Hat

Varda caught the the original Pope's Hat was really a Priest's Hat and then we found out it wasn't and Priest's Hat either so we got a chance to fix that, inserting Priest's for Pope's and also fixing that to remove the Priest's Hat entirely and our spelling and grammer errors too.  Hope this clears up the confusion in a confusing way.

We were making a stiffer levain Italian style and decided to revisit another Italian bread – Altamura style like David Snyder did here

Pane tipo di Altamura from "Local Breads"

 

 This bread is also one where the whole multi-grains were going to be in the levain.  We also decided to go more Italian style with a stiff levain - 51%.  Since the whole grains  only amounted to 35% or so and not too much rye or spelt,  we thought a good 30 hour retard would really bring out the whole grain flavor and the sour too.

  

First off you simmer the soaker seeds for 3 minutes and then let them soak for 24 hours.  We would normally use the excess water at the end of the soak for the dough liquid but forgot to this time - so we saved it for the next bake.  Remember to rum a paper towel or two through the well drained soaker seeds to get rid of as much excess liquid as you can, otherwise, the dough will bee wetter than it already will be.

 

Nothing like a big picture of the reject :-)

The levain was made over (3) 4 hour builds and an additional 10 second one at the end.   20 g of the water in build 3 was added and mixed it at the 12 hour mark.  The levain was very stiff at 51% before this addition and so the normal doubling we look for went out the window.   We got 50% and that is normal for this levain type.

  

The rest of the ingredients, less the soaker seeds, were autolysed for 1 hour before mixing with the levain.   Then 10 minutes of French slap and folds followed.  After a 15 minute rest 2 sets of S&F’s followed on 15 minute intervals.  Then the soaker seeds were added and 2 minutes of slap and folds were used to rebuild the gluten structure and incorporate the seeds.

 

The dough was then allowed to develop on the counter for an hour in a well oiled covered bowl where the plastic was oiled too.  The dough was then retarded for 30 hours in the fridge at 38 F.  It easily doubled in volume while in the fridge. 

 

After removing from the fridge and letting it warm on the counter for 2 hours we took out first shot at shaping a Pane tipo di Altamura.  This turned out to be the pre-shape since it ended up looking like 2 ugly stuck together baguettes. Plus it wouldn't  fit on the mini ovens 12” square broiler pan. 

 

So we took another shot at the shape a few minutes later and it came out a lot better - but not at all like it should have if we were writing home about it.  But, it now fit on the top of the broiler pan too – a really good thing.  It then went into a trash can liner for final proof and was placed on a heating pad set to low with some kitchen towels on top of the pad.

 

After and hour it had popped itself open at the seam so we tried to fix that by re-sealing and we were almost half way successful. Another hour and it had puffed itself up well enough to bake.  Into the 450 F preheated mini oven it went after throwing a ¼ of water in the bottom of the broiler pan and heating one of Sylvia’s steaming cups for the vented top where the bread would bake. 

 

After 12 minutes of steam the Pane tipo di Altamura had sprung nicely so we removed the steam and turned down the oven to 400 F, convection this time.   We continued bake for 10 minutes rotating the bread 180 degress every 5 minutes.

 

This my new apprentice.  As I was hiking in Sabino Canyon in Tucson yesterday , this Roadrunner followed me on the trail for about 1/4 of a mile.  I didn't want to scare it off but as I took a few step he would take a few too.   Next thing you know he was walking with me as I hiked along. 

They are expertly camouflaged and if they don't want you to see them - you won't.  I already miss my new hiking buddy :-(

Then we turned the bread over on its top and continued to bake for 8 more minutes to brown the bottom when the bread reached 205 F in the thickest part.  The bread had baked a total of 30 minutes.  The crust was nicely browned and crispy but no huge bubbles which is the norm for baking this way in the mini.   The crumb went chewy and soft as it cooled.

The crumb turned out very soft and moist with chewy bits of soaker seeds - just liked we hoped.  The surprising thing about this bread is that it tastes great.  The grain flavors and sour are front and center.   It has to be one for best tasting crusts and crumbs we have ever managed and my new apprentice would have approved as much as old one did. 

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

22

0

0

22

4.80%

Oat

3

5

3

11

3.24%

Buckwheat

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Quinqoa

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Amranth

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Kamut

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Spelt

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Dark Rye

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Whole Wheat

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Millet

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Farro

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Water

30

2

22

54

11.79%

Total

82

52

52

186

40.61%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

88

19.21%

 

 

 

Water

65

14.19%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

73.86%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.66%

 

 

 

Toadies

4

0.87%

 

 

 

Vital Wheat Gluten

10

2.18%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.66%

 

 

 

AP

350

76.42%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

370

80.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.75%

 

 

 

Water

275

60.04%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

74.32%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Scald & Soak

0

%

 

 

 

Buckwheat

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Rye

20

4.37%

 

 

 

WW

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Kamut

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Spelt

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Farro

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Total Scld & Soak

120

26.20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

458

 

 

 

 

Water

340

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

74.24%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

926

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

36.24%

 

 

 

 

 

 

kvenick's picture
kvenick

Peter Reinhart Whole Wheat Hearth Bread

I made a loaf the other day and it was...ok.  Resulting loaf was about a pound, and seems very dense to me.

The finished dough may have risen about 1.5  times, did not spread much when proofing. I certainly did not get the over spring that PR got in those lovely pictures and . It's hard to tell from the directions how soft the dough should be after BIGA and SOAKER combined. The dough is not very hydrated, and I usually bake with 75% hydration, which results in softer dough. So I am kind of lost tryng to figure out the best way to work with this reecipe.

Using KA Whole Wheat flour. Baked at 500 for 20 minutes, then 450 for the remainder. Any suggestions?

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Cumin Walnut Cheese Rye Sourdough Bread, (Unintentional) Batter Method

Long time, no see, TFL.

In summary I've been away, coping with a hefty workload and tending to personal matters. Of course, I continued baking---a tendency I doubt will be curbed or abandoned. Why's that? Because baking is my stress-reliever. (I'm sure many homebakers can relate.)

Without further ado, I present to you my latest experiment: Cumin Walnut Cheese Rye Sourdough Bread.

 

Believe it or not, this loaf (it's not a muffin, I assure you) was supposed to be Franko's 68% Rye Bread with Pumpkin Seeds.

*Lowers head in shame.*

Out of necessity and/or experimentation, I substituted the high-gluten flour with all-purpose flour, the pumpkin seeds with toasted walnuts, the caraway seeds with ground cumin, ommitted the non-diastatic malt powder, and incorporated smoked scamorza (i.e., an Italian cheese) into the dough.

 

In addition to the substitutions, I prepared an overnight soaker by combining the all-purpose flour and a portion of the iced water. (Anybody familiar with Txfarmer's 36+ hours sourdough baguettes?) According to my hypothesis, the hydrated soaker will develop its gluten matrix, amplify its sweetness, and strengthen the final dough.

False.

What resulted was a soupy dough, forcing me to abandon my original recipe and producing another on spot. While panicking, I processed several scenarios in my mind until a light bulb popped over my head:

"I'll pour the batter into tins!"

 

After pouring the batter-like dough into four separate tins, another idea sprung into my head. I liberally sprinkled ground walnuts atop---so much that a good sum didn't adhere to the dough.

Oh, what a waste...

 

I'm so, so glad it worked out---much better than I anticipated. Now, before I describe the flavours, let me bestow to you the reasonings behind the selected ingredients.

Walnuts pair well with rye. Caraway also pairs well with rye, but I felt cumin would better complement the walnuts. (Compared to caraway, cumin is more citrusy and pungent in flavour.) I've witnessed others on TFL add dried fruits to their walnut breads but I sought a savoury loaf. Thus, I specifically chose smoked scamorza, a semi-soft Italian cheese, for its milky, faintly sweet, and assertive smoky flavours, as well as its suberb melting quality.

Summarized flavour profile: 

Harbouring the distinct aroma of cumin, the unusually soft crumb tasted slightly sweet and mildly savoury (i.e., buttery and nutty), punctuated by a faint but pleasant tang. Further, such flavours were accompanied by a creamy and cool mouthfeel. My overall rating: Pretty darn good for a batter bread.

---

For those who are interested, you may find the recipe below:

Rye Sourdough Starter

  • Medium rye flour [407 g]
  • Mineral water [407 g]
  • Rye sourdough starter, 100% hydration [27 g]

Soaker

  • All-purpose flour, Unbleached, Enriched [262 g]
  • Mineral water, Iced [ 205 g]

Final Dough

  • Rye sourdough starter [740 g]
  • Soaker [413 g]
  • Medium rye flour [123 g]
  • Whole walnuts, Toasted [104 g]
  • Smoked scamorza, Grated [93 g]
  • Sea salt [15 g]
  • Whole cumin, Ground [6 g]

Others

  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Unsalted butter
  • Whole walnuts, Untoasted, Ground

Total Baker's Percentages

  • Flour [100%]
    • Medium rye flour [68%]
    • All-purpose flour [32%]
  • Mineral water [76%]
  • Whole walnuts, Toasted [14.4%]
  • Sea salt [2%]
  • Cumin, Ground [0.8%]
  • Smoked scamorza, Grated [13%]

Instructions

  1. Mix starter ingredients; rest at room temp. for approx. 12 hours
  2. Mix soaker ingredients; chill for approx. 12 hours
  3. Mix starter, soaker, and medium rye flour; hand-knead for 5 minutes
  4. Add salt to dough; hand-knead for 5 minutes
  5. Add ground cumin and toasted walnuts to dough; hand-knead for 3 minutes
  6. Add grated scamorza to dough; hand-knead for 2 minutes
  7. Apply olive oil to bowl; pour dough into oiled bowl
  8. Bulk ferment for 30 - 45 minutes
  9. Butter tins
  10. Pour dough into buttered tins
  11. Proof for 30 - 45 minutes
  12. Sprinkle ground walnuts atop
  13. Bake at 230C / 446F (convection off) for 10 minutes, with steam
  14. Bake at 210C / 410F (convection on) for 30 - 40 minutes, without steam (rotate loaves every 10 minutes)
  15. Cool at minimum for 1 hour

 ---

Want to know what I've been baking the past few weeks? Well, thankfully, you can scroll down to find out (sorry, only crumbshots).

Ontbijtkoek (Dutch-Belgian Breakfast Cake)


Cocoa Chocolate Coffee Sourdough Bread

 

Palm Sugar Financiers (French Almond Cakes)

 

Whole Wheat Multi-Seed Sourdough Batard

---

As always, critiques and suggestions are welcomed.

Farewell for now everybody. Wish you all the best and have a happy baking. :)

Zita

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Low carb or Low blood sugar impact bread

I have been experimenting with trying to get a low carb bread that doesn't impact my blood sugar and I've finally hit on one.

When testing this recipe....
My baseline blood sugar reading was 105
I ate one whole roll on an empty stomach.
I tested at 30 minutes and the reading was 122
I tested 30 minutes later at 1 hour and the reading was 140
I tested 30 minutes later at 1 hour and 30 minutes and the reading was 124
I tested 30 minutes later at 2 hours and the reading was 110

The really amazing thing about this is that I get a reading of between 160 and 170 at one hour with nothing but plain meat.

Later that night I ate a hamburger on one of these buns with mayo, mustard, pickle, tomato, onion and meat. My blood sugar reading at one hour was 132... The amount of bran in the mix seems to reduce the impact of whatever you eat along with the bread.

I'm using home ground whole wheat flour, I'm not sure if that is the same thing as what you buy in the grocery store. If I didn't have a grain mill I would buy stone ground whole wheat from a health food store. If I'm not mistaken I believe that what you get in the grocery store is just white flour with germ and bran mixed back in.

I'm using the Equate brand (course milled) psyllium husks from Walmart.

Low Carb Buns and Bread

2-1/3 cups very warm tap water
1 teaspoon sugar
4 packets Splenda
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup oil
2 eggs
2 tablespoons yeast
Mix wet ingredients well in bread machine pan or Kitchen Aid mixer bowl. Add yeast and let stand for 5 minutes or until it starts to foam up.

Then add dry ingredients.....
3 cups whole wheat flour
6 tablespoons psyllium husks
3/4 cup vital wheat gluten

Select dough cycle on bread machine and let the kneading cycle finish then let the dough rise for 15 minutes. Any longer and the dough will start crawling out of the machine. I've never done this in the mixer but I think kneading on low speed with the dough hook about 12 to 15 minutes should do then let the dough rise 15 minutes.

Divide the dough into 12 – 4 ounce rolls, shape and place on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper.

Let rise for 25 minutes while you preheat your oven to 375 degrees.

Bake at 375 for 25 minutes. Cool on wire rack.

Flavor improves overnight so it's best to bake the bread the day before you will need it.

 

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