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breadsong's picture
breadsong

Susan's Blueberry Sourdough Scones

Hello everyone,
I had some extra starter (wheat, rye, durum) ... and yesterday, saw Susan's post featuring lovely Blueberry Sourdough Scones.
Mixed some up last night and froze them; baked fresh this morning - Yum :^)  
Thanks, Susan, for a delicious recipe and great way to use extra starter! 

                               

These scones are very tangy and tasty. Not too much sugar in the dough - a light sprinkle of cinnamon sugar over the top before baking tasted quite nice!

Happy baking everyone!
:^) breadsong

Sending, with gratitude, to Susan @ YeastSpotting

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

T-Rex Meets Floyd’s Sweet Potato Bread & Brownman’s SD & YW Combo Starter

We always seem to have smoked and BBQ ribs for many holidays. This Memorial Day was no exception.  In KCMO where I grew up, the ribs are famous and are always served with Wonder Bread.  I was looking for a different bread when I saw Floyd’s Sweet Potato Rolls in the home page.   I though this might make a great bread to go with ribs.

 Quite unlike my wayward and undisciplined apprentice, I try to stay as close to recipes as I can but, in this case I don’t stock any commercial yeast, so I hope Floyd doesn’t mind that I subbed a SD and YW starter and converted the rolls to a bread - boule style.   I think my apprentice threw in some rye and WWW while I wasn’t looking too!   Other than that, we were true to Floyd’s intentions – pretty much.

 To commemorate Ian’s first home page cover for his Semolina, Toasted Almond Multi-Grain Bread, I used his signature T-Rex slash for this bread and for once it was near perfect – a real first for me.  Ian must finally be rubbing off on me.

 The beauty of this bread is unmistakable.  Sweet taters give this bread a lovely orange cast inside and out.  The color is what drew me to it in Floyd’s post.  I was so glad it didn’t stick to my cheap basket. 

 It also smelled great while baking from the cinnamon and nutmeg light spice in the dough.   My wife was asking what that smell was?  If it’s not Thanksgiving, I guess it is harder to pin down.

 The crust went soft as it cooled and we cannot wait to have it for dinner in about 2 hours.  Crumb shots after that.

 Method

 The levain was built over 3 stages of 4 hours each and the YW and SD were mixed together from the beginning as has been the usual lately.  After 12 hours the levain had more than doubled and into the fridge it went for an overnight stay.

We micro waved two small sweet potato and mashed the with a fork to get the ¾ of C required.

In the morning I mixed everything together in the mixing bowl (including the salt so I don’t forget it), except the levain and let it sit for 30 minutes to autolyse.  Then the levain went in and we mixed it on KA 2 for 6 minutes and the KA 3 for 2 more minutes. The dough was then transferred to a plastic covered, oiled bowl to rest for 15 minutes.

4 sets of  S&F’s were done 15 minutes apart each time on a slightly floured work surface  and then the dough was allowed to rest on an oiled bowl and ferment / develop for an hour. 

After an hour rest, 1 more set of S&F’s were done to help shape the dough into a boule.  The dough was dragged across a non-floured surface to make sure the skin was taught.  It was flipped over and the bottom seam was completely pinched off and sealed.  Then the boule was flipped over and dragged again to stretch the skin tight.   It was placed upside down in a rice floured basket to double in a plastic bag on the counter.  It rose ½” above the top of the basket in 2 ¾ hours and passed the poke test.

After 2 hours the oven was readied by preheating to 500 F with steam and stone in place.  I use 2 of Sylvia’s towel in a baking pan method for steam now.  In 45 minutes the oven was ready.  The boule was un-molded by putting parchment on the top, a peel on top of that and then the whole shebang overturned.

 Into the oven it went and the temperature was turned down to 425 F.  after 15 minutes of steaming the steam was removed and the temperature was turned down to375 Fconvection this time.  The boule was turned every 5 minutes and after a total of 38 minutes it was deemed done.   The bread was not allowed to crisp in the off oven with the door ajar as usual but was immediately moved to a cooling rack since we wanted the crust soft like Wonder Bread.

SD and YW Sweet Potato Bread     
      
Mixed StarterBuild 1Build 2 Build 3Total%
SD Starter20100304.72%
Yeast Water20200408.00%
Rye0025255.00%
WWW0205255.00%
AP403007014.00%
Water2030106012.00%
Total Starter1001104025050.00%
      
Starter     
Hydration85.19%    
Levain % of Total17.90%    
      
Dough Flour %   
Rye255.00%   
White WW255.00%   
AP45090.00%   
Dough Flour500100.00%   
Salt71.40%   
Milk33066.00%   
Dough Hydration66.00%    
      
Total Flour635    
Milk445    
T. Dough Hydrat.70.08%    
      
Hydration w/ Adds75.12%    
Total Weight1,397    
      
Add - Ins %   
Sweet Potato16032.00%   
Total31062.00%   

Note : 1/2 tsp of cinnamon and 1/4 tsp of fresh grated nutmeg are added with autolyse.

 

MaximusTG's picture
MaximusTG

Whole rye and wheat flour sourdough bread with walnuts and sunflower seeds

 Wanting to bake another sourdough bread with a larger portion of whole rye, I started searching on the internet, and came across this recipe:

http://beginningwithbread.wordpress.com/2008/11/08/sourdough-rye-with-walnuts/

This was interesting because I had some walnuts left from something else. Not quite enough, so I added some sunflower seeds. Roasted them a bit.

I had already fed my sourdough starter and put it in the refridgerator before it reached its peak. The recipe mentions adding instant yeast in the final dough. I omitted that, because I wanted it pure sourdough.

Around midnight last Saturday I made the levain, whole rye, water, my starter. Did add a bit more than in the recipe. Left this out to ferment. 14.00 in the afternoon on Sunday I made the final dough, but did not let it rise outside, but instead kept it in the refridgerator (I had a party, so I didn't have time to bake it then). A 24 hour rise in the refridgerator later I took it out, formed a batard and let it proof for about 2,5 hours on a couche. 
Baked following recipe, and this came out: 

Update: Crumb photo's:

twofeathers's picture
twofeathers

wheat-free

I have recently been told to eat no wheat.  Easy to say.  I'm not a cook.  I would like to eat sandwiches (bagels, english muffins).  Where can I find a 'wheat-free' bread recipe?  I've read about flax seed and a few other wheat-free flours.  Is there a conversion chart?  I've also read that one shouldn't expect wheat flour consistency in the dough or the finished product.  I can deal with it.  Also, can any recipe be used in a bread machine or are they (bread machines) not a good idea?   It's a little exciting, thinking about baking my own bread.  If anyone can help, I would greatly appreciate any info.

isand66's picture
isand66

Semolina Toasted Almond Multi-Grain Bread

I was inspired to try adding some balsamic vinegar into one of my breads after reading about Karen Hanseata's Wild Rice bread on the Fresh Loaf this past week.  I have some cherry balsamic  that I love using so I was curious to see if it would have any affect on the taste of my bread.

While looking for some different components to add to my next bake I discovered that my wife had stashed some Toasted Almond Flour in the refrigerator so I figured why not give it a try.

I also used some Potato flour and Durum flour along with some hickory smoked sea salt and assorted all natural grains for this bake.

I cut back on the hydration slightly from my previous multi-grain breads and not counting the 359 grams of water used in the soaker it comes in at only 56%.  There is no doubt that the water from the soaker makes the final dough much moister than 56%.  I also did not count the soaker grains as part of the flour.  According to the BBGA (Bakers Guild of America) soakers including the water and other ingredients should be considered "hydration neutral".  This is obviously a difficult concept to control but none the less that is the prevailing rule in the industry.

For this bake I made a boule as well as a circular shape similar to a large donut.

The final dough came out very tasty. You can see the toasted almond flour imparted a slightly orange tinted color in the crumb and it gives it a very nutty flavor.  I can't say that I tasted the cherry balsamic vinegar but I'm sure it added to the overall flavor profile somehow.  The crumb is nice an open and moist and you can see some of the soaker grains melded together.

If you venture to try this, please let me know how your attempt comes out.

Ingredients

Soaker

28 Grams English Malted Flakes

60 Grams Bulgar Wheat

55 Grams Organic Oat Bran

55 Grams Cracked Wheat

285 Grams Boiling Water

Final Dough

425 Grams White Starter recently refreshed (65% Hydration Seed Starter)

200 Grams Durum Semolina Flour (KAF Brand-make sure  you don't use the Fancy Semolina flour which is too gritty)

250 Grams Bread Flour (KAF)

58 Grams Toasted Almond Flour (KAF)

35 Grams Potato Flour

14 Grams  Hickory Smoked Seas Salt or Table Salt

264 Grams Water, 90 degrees F.

12 Grams Cherry Balsamic Vinegar (Feel free to substitute any Balsamic you have or just add more water)

Directions

Mix all ingredients for soaker in a bowl and add boiling water.  Let it sit for 2-3 hours covered until the grains are soft.  (I actually only let it sit for 1 hour which was long enough).

Add the water and flours into your mixing bowl and mix for 2 minutes on low.  The dough should come together in a shaggy mess and should be relatively moist at this point.  Let it rest (autolyse) for 25 minutes and then add the salt, balsamic vinegar and the soaker and mix for 4 minutes more on medium low-speed.  If necessary you can add some additional water or flour but be careful not to make the dough too dry.  It should be relatively sticky but not soupy.

Remove dough from mixing bowl to work surface and do a stretch and fold.  You may need to wet or oil your hands and the work surface since the dough will still be very sticky at this point. Form the dough into a ball and let it rest uncovered for 10 minutes.  Let the dough rest uncovered for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes do another stretch and fold and cover the dough with a moist lint free towel or plastic wrap sprayed with non-stick cooking spray.  Do another stretch and fold two more times letting the dough rest 10 minutes each time.

 After the last stretch and fold put the dough into an oiled bowl and cover it tightly.

Let the dough sit in your bowl for 2 hours at room temperature.  It should only rise slightly at this point.  After the 2 hours are up put in your refrigerator for at least 12 hours or up to 3 days.

When ready to bake the bread take your bowl out of the refrigerator and let it sit at room temperature for around 2 hours.  After 2 hours shape the dough as desired being careful not to handle the dough too roughly so you don't de-gas it.

To make the circle bread I formed half the dough into a cylinder and formed it into a circle.  I placed a small glass bowl in the middle wrapped in plastic wrap that I sprayed with cooking spray to prevent it from sticking to the dough.  I placed the dough into a large banneton and let it rest per below.

Let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours covered with oiled plastic wrap or a moist cloth.

Pre-heat oven with baking stone (I use one on bottom and one on top shelf of my oven), to 500 degrees F.

Slash loaves as desired and place empty pan in bottom shelf of oven.

Pour 1 cup of very hot water into pan and place loaves into oven.

Lower oven to 450 Degrees and bake for 25 - 35 minutes until bread is golden brown and internal temperature reaches 200 degrees.

Shut the oven off and leave the bread inside with the door slightly open for 10 minutes.  This will help dry the loaves out and keep the crust crunchy.

Let cool on cooling rack and enjoy!

Debbe1's picture
Debbe1

Wheat Protein Isolate (WPI) Whole Wheat Bread 3.2 carbs per slice

Wheat Protein Isolate (WPI) Whole Wheat Bread

2 teaspoons instant yeast
1/3 cup WPI 8000 (0 carbs)
1/3 cup Carbalose (6.3 carbs)
1/2 cup white whole wheat flour (30 carbs)
1/3 cup WPI 5000 (1 carb)
1/4 cup oat fiber (0 carbs)
2 tablespoons resistant wheat starch (2 carbs)
1/4 cup ground flaxseed (0 carbs)
2 tablespoons wheat bran (2 carbs) Optional can use rice bran (4 carbs)
2 tablespoons wheat germ (7 carbs)
2 teaspoons Truvia (0 net carbs it is a sugar alcohol and stevia)
2 teaspoons black strap molasses (8 carbs) but not counted because yeast consumes it
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons Butter
1 large egg (.5 carb)
1- 1 1/4 cups warm water (use more if needed to make the dough slightly sticky)

Combine ingredients into a bread machine. Place on dough cycle remove when finished mixing, do not let it rise in the machine. Form a loaf and place in a greased loaf pan. Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 45 minutes. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes.

Number of Servings: 15
3.2 carbs per slice

jamesjr54's picture
jamesjr54

Semolina sourdough

Made this today in my new Cajun dutch oven

120 g 100% hydration starter (fed night before)

202 g KAP202 semolina (fine)25 g rye25 g oat bran10 g salt300 warm waterMix all but SaltAutolyse 30 minKnead 10 min w/saltProof 2 hours room temp with stretch and folds at 30 and 60 minutesPre-shape, shape, and proof in refrigerator 2 hoursPreheat oven to 500f with Dutch oven insideTake loaf out during preheatBake 475F for 20 covered, 25 uncoveredNotes: this was very wet, 72% or so. Starter is so active it's proofing like IDY. Temp today is >85F. Had to put it in fridge to slow it down. Could have baked right out of fridge. It's delicious!
JennsBread's picture
JennsBread

Is "sucanat" the same thing as that raw sugar in a box?

I looked up "sucanat" and found its a brand name (correct?)  (i googled it)

soooo.. my question is... is "suagar in the raw" in the brown box, the same thing???

thanks!

(wal mart doesn't carry "sucanat" but it DOES have sugar in the raw, and I want to try whole wheat choc chip cookies!)

 

TIA!

 

--Jenn

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Cottage Cheese Rolled Oat Rolls & Mini Baguettes

My first intention was to make some hamburger and hot dog buns, but as usual I couldn't resist the temptation to be more creative.  These rolls really didn't turn out ideal for its original purpose, but they do taste real good none the less.

I usually don't use yeast anymore in most of my baking since I prefer to use my sourdough starter, but in this case my starter was not ready for duty so I used instant yeast and a long cold slumber in the refrigerator to develop some nice flavors.

The end result was nice semi-soft roll with a nice crumb and simple clean flavor.  These rolls make great sandwiches and go well with a smear of cream cheese or butter!

Ingredients

453 grams Bread Flour (KAF is my brand of choice)

200 grams Whole Wheat Flour (KAF Organic)

80 grams Rolled Oats

155 grams Cottage Cheese Drained (I used 2%)

11 grams Olive Oil

55 grams Egg Yolks (about 3 yolks depending on your egg size)

405 grams Water (90 degrees F.)

7 grams Instant Yeast (If you have Active Yeast you need to convert from Instant and increase the amount.  You will also need to activate the yeast in the water first if you don't use Instant Yeast.  Instant Yeast does not require any activation and can be mixed with the dry or wet ingredients)

11 grams Blue Agave sweetener (Feel free to substitute honey or molasses if desired)

14 grams Table salt or sea salt

Directions

Mix the flours and oats with the water for 1 minute in your mixer or by hand in your work bowl.  Let it sit covered for 1 hour to autolyse.

After an hour mix in the cottage cheese, eggs, oil, yeast, agave and salt and mix on speed 2 on your mixer for 4 minutes or by hand.

Take the dough out of the bowl and place on your work surface.  Knead it by hand for 1 minute and form it into a ball.  Let it rest for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes do a stretch and fold from all sides and form it into a ball again.  Let it rest another 10 minutes and then do 1 additional stretch and fold and immediately put it in a lightly oiled bowl.  Cover the bowl and put it in your refrigerator for 1-3 days.

When you are ready to make your rolls take the dough out of the refrigerator and keep it in its bowl at room temperature for 1.5 -  2 hours.  After its rest it is time to shape the rolls or baguettes or Boules, etc.  I decided to make rolls and mini baguettes.    Cut the dough into 3 oz. pieces and form round rolls making sure each roll is nice and tight. or form into small rectangle and roll into mini baguettes.  Place rolls on cookie sheet and cover the rolls with a clean lint free towel sprayed with water or a piece of plastic wrap lightly sprayed with cooking spray.  Let the rolls rest at room temperature for 2 hours or until they are at least 1.5 the size.

I was going to use an egg wash which would have been a nice idea had I not been trying to cook dinner and prepare another dough for today, so unfortunately that step was omitted.  Feel free to use an egg wash and add some seeds or bran flakes etc. for that nice finishing touch.

Around 30 minutes before baking the rolls, prepare your oven and pre-heat at 425 degrees.  I used my usual set-up for steam and added 1 cup of boiling water to a pan on the bottom shelf but for rolls you could omit this step and you will get softer rolls if that is what you desire.

It should take around 20-25 minutes to bake the rolls and they should be nice and brown on the bottom and top.  When done, let them cool on a wire rack and enjoy.This post has been submitted to Yeast Spotting at http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting.

Enjoy!

PaulZ's picture
PaulZ

Best Point to Retard?

Hi all,

When is the best point to retard a dough prep / ferment process in order to stretch the process over 3 days?

If we accept that the regular stages are (Day 1: Night before) PREP LEVAIN/STARTER 12-16HRS>(Day 2:) MIX>BULK FERMENT (with STRETCH & FOLDS)>DIVIDE>REST>SHAPE>FINAL PROOF>BAKE, where is the best point to intervene and place dough in fridge in order to continue the following day, i.e. bake on Day 3? I am inclined, IMHO, to break the process in the final proof stage but when? At the start of the final proof? In the middle and continue the next day? And would the retarding work equally well for both levain bread and sour dough bread? Please help :(

Paul

 

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