The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

bakers

  • Pin It
savvyscrapper's picture

Can you complete a 5 question interview for me? Bakers

September 9, 2012 - 7:30am -- savvyscrapper
Forums: 

Hoping to find a few people who could answer simple questions for me for a paper that I am writing. 

1) Do you have a certification or degree in baking?  Do you feel it necessary to have a degree to become a baker?

2) What flours do you like to work with the most?

3) What is the biggest challenge in baking bread?

4) Favorite tool that you could not live without

5) Biggest lesson that you would share with others regarding baking.

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Since I first got excited about bread, I have been dreaming of ways to use that love for bread for creating something worth sharing with the rest of the world. I have dreamed of opening my own bakery (not going to happen any time soon, but never say never). I have bought a bunch of domain names for starting a bread blog (such as BakerDad.com or 365breads.com to name two). But all the time, I wasn't quite sure what my thing should be. Well, I guess you can never be sure...

But today, after working on it since the beginning of January, I am very happy and proud of something I have created, and I'd love you to see it as well.

It's a free magazine on bread—called Bread, quite simply. 

The magazine comes in PDF format that you can download to your computer and consists of interviews, stories, and some tips and recipes. Plus photos of beautiful loaves of bread. But mostly, it is about the people who make great bread.

As the magazine unfolds in the next editions, my goal is to dig deep into specific areas of bread making with editions dedicated to topics such as fermentation, flour, heat, and so on—starting from flour in issue number 2. 

The first issue, which I published today, is an introduction to the journey, looking at the question of what bread really is all about: what makes it special, and how people fall in love with it. In making the magazine, I have approached this question through stories: I start by telling my own small story, and then move on to interviewing more advanced bakers.

Phil Agnew, a familiar face from The Fresh Loaf, tells about his relationship to bread.

Larry Lowary, a long time baker, is retired from active work but runs a small bakery on his backyard—as a hobby, he says. 

And what excites me the most, I even got the chance to interview my baking hero, Richard Bertinet

In addition to these baker interviews, there is an interview with Chris Young from the Real Bread Campaign and some beginner instructions for baking bread at home. 

If this sounds too much like an advertisement, I'm sorry! I will return to normal bread posts next time... :) But I'm very excited about this today, and it's free... So, take a look!

cookingwithdenay's picture

3 States Awaiting Governor Signatures on Cottage Food Laws

June 7, 2011 - 11:53am -- cookingwithdenay
Forums: 

Just an FYI! There are 3 states currently waiting on their Governors to sign and pass their state Cottage Food Laws. The states are Florida, Illinois and Texas (the bills are currently on the Governors' desk). The cottage food law in Washington state should go into effect in late July or early August (it was passed). Bakers are still trying to get support from legislators in California. Keeping your fingers crossed.

Happy Baking !

Denay

sprouted bread baker's picture

calling all sprouted wheat bread bakers

February 5, 2011 - 6:32pm -- sprouted bread baker
Forums: 

Hi,


I want to host a conference/gathering for bakers of sprouted wheat breads. Commercial bakers and home bakers. Anyone who has been working to perfect the wonderful breads that are derived from sprouted wheat. At Columbia County Breads, we buy our wheat from local organic farmers and bake our sprouted whole grain breads in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania - about two and a half hours due west from NYC. 

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay

A surprising thing is happening across America; many foodies are trying their hand at baking from home to not only make extra income but sell delicious food products in their community. Today food crafters have more options when it comes to selling their specialty foods, and consumers are seeking out the unusual to compliment their daily meals. Visit any food cooperative, farmers market, or street food festival and you are bound to run across pickled okra, Plumhoney ®, chocolate truffle cupcakes and hot pepper cheese bread.


The new trend is to buy local, from local vendors enjoying foods that literally come from the vendor's kitchen to your dining table. The owner of the Turtle Box Bakery, Abraham Palmer of Carrboro, North Carolina not only mills some of his own wheat; he is working diligently to make a difference in the community by introducing consumers to how products are made from the ground up.


There are home-based bakers like Lilian Chavira, of Gellocake in Okemos, Michigan, who crafted a special kitchen in her basement, so she could create a bakery business operated solely from home. These food crafters have no intention of operating a traditional bakery and prefer to build a loyal group of customers that will purchase their baked goods and spread support via word of mouth.


One of the easiest food businesses to start is a small bakery. They are potentially low risk and depending on where you sell your goods, products can easily be moved from kitchen to customer.


The top 10 states that have cottage food laws, not only permitting but promoting home-based baking and food processing include:



  • Indiana

  • Iowa

  • New Hampshire

  • North Carolina

  • Oregon

  • Utah

  • Vermont

  • Virginia

  • Washington  

  • Wyoming


One of the first cottage food laws documented involved the state of Oregon with a 20 year history in the home food processing business and since 2009 the number of states creating "cottage food laws" as doubled. No doubt the struggling U.S. economy has played a pivotal part in motivating the increased interest in small food processing and home-based baking. It is something foodies can do from their home kitchen, allowing them to work around family obligations.


It should be pointed out that making a profit from a home-based bakery or home food processing business will not be easy. All too often food crafters assume that "if they make it, customers will come." Not so, developing any type of business, home-based or otherwise is challenging and involves that four letter work many wish to ignore; work.


There are few state records on how many home-based bakers and food processors there are across the nation, but one thing is for sure, as long as there is a market for unique specialty food products and fresh homemade baked goods there will be food crafters flexing their creative juices to make that next gourmet treat.

cookingwithdenay's picture

Is bread baking the "Step-Child" of the baking industry?

October 6, 2010 - 11:12am -- cookingwithdenay
Forums: 

I recently ran across an interesting article about the attention given to baking and the attention "not" given to bread baking. I started to browse around the net and I'm starting to think it might be true. Would love to know your opinion.


Question:


Chefs get all sorts of attention in competitions, but bread bakers, fugetaboutit! Is it really true???


Check out http://www.chewswise.com/chews/2010/09/competitive-breadmaking.html

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Zuccotto is light Italian cake full with pastry cream, fruit and soaked with rum. Fill it with fresh fruit such as, strawberries, raspberries or peaches.


 


 





 



 



 


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2009/08/17/zuccotto-a-cake-for-all-occasions/

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - bakers