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GSnyde

It’s been almost two years since brother David shared with us the formula for Walnut-Raisin Sourdough from San Francisco Baking Institute (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21289/walnut-raisin-sourdough-bread-sfbi-artisan-ii).   I’ve made this bread three or four time times, but it’s been a long time.  Too long.  So I baked a couple little loaves yesterday.

This bread is essentially a pain de campagne with some toasted walnuts and raisins.  It has a nice semi-chewy crumb and a crispy crust, and wonderful complex flavor.  It’s also—for some reason—one of the best smelling breads I know.  My spouse and I prefer pecans to walnuts, and I used a combination of dried cranberries and golden raisins.  The bread is delicious all by itself, but is even splendider with some cream cheese.

I used Central Milling Organic Artisan Baker’s Choice white flour, Central Milling’s Organic Hi-Protein Fine Whole Wheat flour and Bob’s Red Mill Dark Rye flour.  The formula is shown below.

 The dough was just a tad underproofed.  So the bread was a tad underpoofed.

Pecan-Cranberry-Raisin Sourdough (Variation on SFBI Formula)

Total Formula

 

 

 

Ingredients

Baker's %

Wt (g)

(2 @ 550g)

Wt (g)

(3 @ 550g)

  AP flour

71.57

383

574

  Whole Wheat flour

19.77

106

160

  Dark Rye flour

8.66

46

69

Water

67.62

362

543

Pecans (toasted)

15.81

85

130

Raisins and/or Cranberries (soaked)

19.77

106

160

Salt

2.13

11

17

Total

206.41

1100

1653

 

Levain

 

 

 

Ingredients

Baker's %

Wt (g)

 (for 2 loaves

Wt (g)

(for 3 loaves

AP flour

95

77

114

Dark Rye flour

5

4

6

Water

50

40

60

Stiff Starter

60

48

72

Total

210

169

254

      Mix all ingredients until well incorporated.

      Ferment 12 hrs at room temperature.

       

Final Dough

 

 

 

Ingredients

Baker's %

Wt (g)

(2 @ 550g)

Wt (g)

(3 @ 550g)

AP flour

65

275

412

Whole Wheat flour

25

106

160

Dark Rye flour

10

42

63

Water

72

305

457

Yeast (dry instant)

0.1

0.4

0.6

Pecans (toasted)

25

85

130

Raisins and/or Cranberries (soaked)

20

106

160

Salt

2.7

11

17

Levain

40

169

254

Total

259.8

1100

 

Procedure

      Mix the flours and the water to a shaggy mass. Cover tightly and autolyse for 45-75 minutes.  Desired dough temperature: 78-80F.

      Toast the pecans, broken into large pieces, for 10 minutes at 325ºF. (Can be done ahead of time)

      Soak the raisins/cranberries in cold water. (Can be done ahead of time)

      Add the salt, yeast and levain and mix at Speed 1 until well incorporated (about 2 minutes).

      Mix at Speed 2 to moderate gluten development (about 8 minutes).

      Add the nuts and raisins (well-drained) and mix at Speed 1 until they are well-distributed in the dough.

      Transfer to a lightly floured board and knead/fold a few times if necessary to better distribute the nuts and raisins.

      Round up the dough and transfer to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover tightly.

      Ferment for 2 – 2 ½  hours at 70ºF.

      Divide the dough into two equal pieces. Pre-shape as boules. Let the pieces relax for 20-30 minutes, covered.

      Shape as bâtards or boules and place, seam side up. In bannetons or en couche. Cover well.

      Proof for 1.5 to 2 hours.

      An hour before baking, pre-heat oven to 500ºF with baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

      Transfer the loaves to a peel. Score them. Transfer to the baking stone.

      Turn the oven down to 450ºF and bake for 15 minutes with steam, then another 12 minutes in a dry oven. (Boules may take a few more minutes to bake than bâtards.)  Done when internal temperature is 205 F.

      When the loaves are done, turn off the oven but leave the loaves on the baking stone with the oven door ajar for another 8-10 minutes.

      Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack.

      Cool (almost) completely before slicing.  (The loaves are still slightly warm after 60 minutes).

      **********

Enjoy!

Glenn

 

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

It should come as no surprise to you that I need to lose weight.   My weight-loss regimen is not from a book.   No one would buy a book called “New Diet Secret: Eat Less, Exercise More and Lose Weight!”   This diet along with a crazy busy work life has kept me from baking much lately.  And when I bake, I experiment with “healthy breads”.   I figure I’m not consuming empty calories if my bread has millet or whole oats or cracked wheat.  Plus, some of these more nutritious breads taste really great.

Today I baked a batch of Professor Hamelman’s “Five-Grain Levain”.  The formula includes bread flour and whole wheat flour and calls for a soaker of cracked rye, flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, and oats.  I may be missing something, but I only count three grains there: wheat, rye and oats.  Maybe he’s including the seeds in the grain count. He is a professor, so he must be right.

Anyway…I couldn’t find any cracked rye and my rye-cracker is in the shop.  So I substituted cracked wheat, thus producing a two-grain levain with seeds.   Otherwise, I followed the formula.  I made two batards, one about 1.5 pounds and one about 1.8 pounds, and a few rolls.  The rolls were semi-retarded at 55 F  (San Francisco November) while the loaves baked and the oven re-heated.  Here’s a family photo:

This bread is very moist and light of crumb, with a crispy crust.  Tons of flavor….as you can see below:

So lets talk about multigranularity.  I think the rye would have added a nice touch to this bread.  But I couldn’t tell you why.  I have made others of Hamelman’s multigrain breads and enjoyed them to varying degrees.  I have a sense of the flavor of each of the common multigrain bread ingredients.  But I haven’t experimented enough to know what combinations of grains and seeds I like best.  That is a project for the future.

Meanwhile, one question:  is there any reason why I couldn’t take this Five-Grain Levain formula and substitute other whole grains and seeds in the soaker? 

Hamelman’s Whole-Wheat Bread with a Multigrain Soaker (a bread with a yeasted pre-ferment) calls for cracked wheat, coarse cornmeal, millet and oats in the soaker.  And I like that bread a lot.  It has an overall hydration of 78% (plus 5% honey), while the Five-Grain Levain has an overall hydration of 98%.  So, of course, I’d need to adjust the hydration to reflect the thirstiness of the ingredients.  But other than that, are there any issues with grain/seed combos in sourdough I should take into account.

Thanks.

Glenn

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GSnyde

I was going for the “light and fluffy” 100% whole wheat bread that Brother David has blogged about, taking cues from txfarmer and Professor Reinhart (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22987/light-and-fluffy-100-whole-wheat-bread).   Having no mixer at our North Coast home, I tried to develop the dough to a windowpane by hand-kneading alone.  What I accomplished in 25 minutes of hand-kneading a dense dough (on Speed 2 as recommended) was a sore back and tendonitis in my elbow.  What I did not accomplish was a light and fluffy bread.

The formula is very nice.  The dough rose beautifully in both primary ferment and proof.  There was very little oven spring.

The bread is very delicious, and the smell was incredible.  I wouldn’t call the crumb crumbly.  It has a nice texture. But it isn’t fluffy and shreddable.  The flavor is so good, and the promise of fluffiness so compelling, that I will try it again. But next time it will be in SF, where the Bosch Universal Plus lives.

I do think I will undertake to make an exercise video someday called “The Baker’s Workout”.    It will feature this bread, along with a double batch of bagels, and a three-loaf bake of 100% hand-milled rye bread.  No grain, no pain.  Work it!

Glenn

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GSnyde

Seeking a hardy healthy bread, I decided to try Hamelman's Whole Wheat with Mixed Grain Soaker.  It's 50% whole wheat, made with a pate' fermente', and has a soaker of millet, cracked wheat, corn meal and oats.  I also added toasted sesame, sunflower and pumpkin seeds.  It has a nice crispy crust, tender crumb and a wonderful nutty flavor.  This will not be the last time I make it.

Sorry for the lack of detail, but it's been a busy weekend.

Glenn

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GSnyde

I've been absent from TFL for about a month.  I had a rotator cuff injury that kept me out of the kitchen.  Then a couple busy weekends.  So I've only baked once or twice in the last 5 weeks, and didn't take any photos.

This weekend, we were home and I had time to bake.  I decided to try Hamelman's Vermont Sourdough with Whole Wheat for the first time.  A very nice bread.  As you can see, I baked boldly.  Thick crust and tender crumb.  Very wheaty flavor.  It would be a good base for a seed bread.  

I made one batard and one boule.  The boule decided to expand asymmetrically, likely due to my uneven scoring.  

I hope to get back to more baking and blogging.

Glenn

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GSnyde

A couple weeks ago I got a new cookbook, the recently updated version of Margaret Fox’s Morning Food.  It is chock full of great recipes for muffins, scones, omelettes, fritattas and other a.m. goodies.  It is also a great read, written with humor and charm.

I made her Ole Souffle.  Fox notes that there are intentionally no accent marks on those words: it is pronounced “olee sooful” (she’s as creative with her dish-naming as her cooking).    It is a delicious cornmeal and hot pepper dish—somewhere between cornbread and corn pudding, leavened with baking soda and egg whites, and with some real nice spice.  Served with thawed and re-heated Focaccia buns.

Then this last weekend I made a return to the San Francisco Country Sourdough, with no changes to my formula and method of last time (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27877/after-adventure-nature-back-kitchen-–-countryer-sourdough).

Made a nice sandwich with moist turkey breast and incredible August heirloom tomatoes.

I love Summer!

Glenn

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GSnyde

Recipe ideas come from a variety of inspirations.  I love Carnitas.  I love Duck Confit.  I love Cubano sandwiches.  I recently had an excellent—if non-traditional—Cubano sandwich that had spicy pulled pork (with Chiles and Coriander) in place of the traditional sliced roast pork.  I happened to have some crushed Coriander seed left over from Pastrami rub.  I looked at a bunch of recipes for Carnitas and Cuban-style pork, and went from there.

The result is a semi-hot, complexly spicy and delicious, moist but crispy, pulled duck (yes, David, I know…they quack loudly if you pull too hard).  The balance of spices is inspired (modesty aside)—you can taste each spice but they meld nicely.  It made a wondrous Cubano Sandwich, with Gruyere, sliced Kosher dills and homemade Chipotle–Lime Sauce, all on a home-made Po-Boy Roll (recipe below).

Ingredients:

6 Duck Legs

Kosher Salt

Fresh ground Black Pepper

½ tsp Chile Powder

1 dried Ancho Chile, seeded and minced

2 dried Chipotle Chiles, seeded and minced (or 1 or 3, for less or more heat)

¼ tsp ground Cumin

1 tsp dried Oregano

2 Bay Leaves, broken in half

2 tsp crushed Coriander Seeds

½ tsp crushed Anise Seeds

4 Cloves Garlic, sliced

4-6 oz. Chicken Stock, hot

Juice of 2 Mexican Limes

 

Procedure:

Three to twelve hours before cooking, wash and dry the duck legs and sprinkle them well with salt and pepper.  Cover and refrigerate.

Pre-heat oven to 450 F. 

Mix up the spices listed above from Chile Powder to Anise seeds.  Lightly oil a heavy pot or Dutch Oven that will fit the duck legs in a single layer fairly tightly.  Add the duck legs and roast for 1 ¼ hours, turning them mid-way.

Remove the legs to a plate and spoon out all but a thin layer of the rendered fat.  Pour an ounce or so of the hot stock into the pot and scrape loose the stuff at the bottom of the pot.  Return the legs to the pot and sprinkle with the spice mix, lime juice and garlic slices.  Pour the stock into the pot until the legs are about 2/3 covered.

Return the pot to the oven, uncovered.  Lower temperature to 400 F.  Braise for two hours or until most, but not all, of the liquid is gone, turning the legs once or twice and basting every 20-30 minutes.  The legs should be nicely browned and very tender. [Note: during this stage, if you need the oven—say, to bake some bread—the pot can be moved to the stove on simmer and covered].

Remove the pot from the oven and remove the legs to a plate.  With a slotted spoon, remove most of the solids (garlic, bay, chile and seeds).   When the legs have cooled, remove the bones (and skin and fat if you like) and shred the meat into rough shreds. 

Return the shredded meat to the pot, stir to moisten, and return to the oven.  Reduce heat to 350 F.  Roast for 45-60 minutes uncovered, stirring occasionally, until there is no liquid remaining but the meat is still moist.

The Rolls

And here’s the recipe for the Two-Starter Po-boy Rolls, adapted from a recipe by  Bernard Clayton, brought to my attention by  ehanner (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4329/po-boy-victory).  I thought adding two pre-ferments (a poolish and a levain, as in proth5’s Bear-guettes) might enhance the flavor.  I honestly can’t say it made a big difference, but the rolls were excellent—crispy crust and soft innards.

Mixed Starter Po-Boy Rolls

Poolish:

¼ tsp Instant Yeast

2 oz. Water room temp

2 oz. AP Flour

Levain:

½ oz. Active Starter

2 oz. Water

2 oz. AP Flour

Main Dough:

1 ½ tsp Instant Yeast


2 Tbsp Nonfat Dry Milk


1 Tbsp Sugar


1 Tbsp Salt


20 ½  oz. AP Flour (divided)


12 oz. Warm Water (100 F)


Poolish

Levain

1 Tbsp Butter (room temp)


1 Tbsp. Cold Water

Method:


Mix the levain and the poolish 12 hours ahead.

Mix together 10 oz. with the flour, and the yeast, dry milk, sugar and salt.


Mix the levain, polish, and butter into the warm water and add to dry ingredients.  Mix well (2 min with beater blade). Switch to dough hook and add remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time.  Add additional flour if needed to get to a shaggy elastic but not sticky mass. Cover and rest for 10 minutes.


Knead on speed 2 for 10 minutes. Dough should clean sides of the bowl, adjust flour accordingly.


Turn out into a lightly oiled bowl with at least 2-1/2 times the capacity and cover. Let rise until doubled (1-1-1/4 hrs).


Punch down and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead briefly to degas. Divide into 4 pieces. Pre-shape into a loose rectangle and cover loosely, rest 10 minutes.


Shape using baguette technique.  Seal the seam and ends.  Roll and stretch to desired length and place on parchment lined sheet.  Cover loosely with saran and proof for 45-60 minutes.  The dough should double easily in 45 min.


Pre-heat oven to 400F.
 When proofed, brush dough with cold water, slash, steam oven and bake for 35 Minutes.  Rotate half way through for even color.  Bake to a golden brown (25-30 Minutes).  Cool on a rack.

 

Glenn

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GSnyde

For the first time in a few months, I baked some Tartine Basic Country Bread.   It remains among my favorite breads for crumb texture—it hits the perfect point for me between light/pillowy and chewy.  

I follow Robertson’s formula, except I only make enough levain for one recipe (halving his formula), and this time I used Central Milling’s Organic Type 85 flour for the levain build.  I made the 1970 gram dough batch into three loaves, a 600 gram boule, a 600 gram batard and a 770 gram boule. 

Due to space constraints in my oven, I baked the two smaller loaves in a first batch, and the bigger boule alone (having set it in the fridge for two and half hours at the beginning of the proof, then letting it finish proofing for three hours at room temperature).  This allowed enough time to re-pre-heat the oven and iron skillet with lava rocks for the second bake.  The cold-retarded boule got the best oven spring.

I note a recent comment in Eric Hanner’s post on “Tartine Bread- A Dissenting Viewpoint” (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20544/tartine-bread-dissenting-viewpoint#comment-223087), asking whether there is an error in Robertson’s formula that explains how wet and sticky the dough is.  The answer is “No!”.   Though this dough is hard to handle, and takes judicious use of flour on bench and hands, and lots of rice flour/AP flour mix in the brotformmen/bannetons, the high hydration is one of the keys to the wonderfulness of this bread.

To shape these loaves takes a light dusting of flour on the board, regular applications of flour to the hands, and quick movements with hands and bench knife.  With practice, it can be done. 

My loaves yesterday wanted to stay in their brotformmen, and the sticking deformed a couple of the loaves a bit, but the results were fine.  Next time, even more flour in the brotformmen. 

 Glenn

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GSnyde

A lovely weekend on the North Coast of California. 

First, the Fauna.  Our yard seems to be the pasture of choice for our neighborhood herd of Mule Deer.  And the herd has grown in the last few weeks.  We’ve seen at least three new babies (we refer to them, collectively, as “The Fonz”).  And the young buckeroos were particularly rowdy this weekend.  After the pictures below were taken, a large group assembled not 20 yards from our porch (perhaps drawn by the smell of Focaccia buns baking; more likely by the dandelions in bloom).

Next, the Flora.  Cat and I pretend that our courtyard garden is a big pain to keep up, but the truth is we love working on it.  It’s been a while since I looked at it without making a mental list of the chores that need to be done.  But today, I was looking it over from the upstairs deck, and realized that it looks pretty great.  So I snapped a few photos.

And finally the Pane.  I saw an article in the food section of the SF Chronicle a week or two ago about the wonderful hamburgers at Bistro Don Giovanni in Napa (http://www.sfgate.com/food/chefssecrets/article/Secrets-of-Bistro-Don-Giovanni-s-burger-3674609.php#page-3).  The story included their recipe for Focaccia Buns.  So, with lots of good stuff around for sandwiches (leftover Salmon and Tartar Sauce; leftover chicken and barbecue sauce), I tried it out.  This is about the quickest bread I’ve made (LOTS of yeast).  It takes about two hours from mis en place to baked.  The buns are good—they are tender and tasty and hold up to saucy fillings.  I’m sure they would be great grilled for burgers.

Here’s the recipe (with my added weight measurements):

Bistro Don Giovanni’s Focaccia Hamburger Buns

Makes 12

These buns are adapted from the ones made at Bistro Don Giovanni.  The buns can be made ahead, wrapped well and frozen for a couple of weeks.

         2 1/4 cups (540 g) whole milk

         1/2 ounce (14 g) instant dry yeast, about 1 1/2 tablespoons

         1/4 cup (55 g) olive oil + more as needed

         5 1/3 cups (730 g) all-purpose flour

         4 teaspoons (25 g) salt

Instructions: Line two rimmed baking pans with parchment; set aside.

Warm milk to about 100°-110° and pour into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.  Add the yeast and the 1/4 cup olive oil. Whisk to dissolve the yeast, then add the flour and salt. Mix on low speed until all the flour is incorporated. Increase the speed to medium, and continue to mix for about 2 more minutes.

Put the dough in an oiled bowl; turn to coat all sides with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until almost doubled, about 30-40 minutes. The dough should barely spring back pressed gently with your fingers.

Move oven racks to the middle and bottom third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 425° (400° if using a convection oven).

Divide the dough into 12 equal portions (about 4 ounces each). Shape each portion into a ball. Arrange balls on the prepared baking sheets, spaced well apart (about 6 per sheet). Brush each ball generously with olive oil and let rest 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes, oil the palm of your hand, then use your palm to gently flatten each ball until the top is somewhat flat and the balls are shaped like buns.

Bake for about 15 minutes, or until the buns are light golden brown. If needed, switch pans from top to bottom and back to front for during the last couple of minutes for more even browning.

Place the pans on a rack, brush each bun lightly with olive oil, and let cool completely before slicing. Wrap individually and freeze if not using the same day.

*********************

And may each of you have an enjoyable third fiscal quarter.

Glenn

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GSnyde

Why not?  I know rye bread is traditional.  But when one’s spouse doesn’t care much for rye bread, and suggests Challah, what is one to do?  Easy answer:  make Challah.

As I noted in my last blog post, I prepared more Pastrami last weekend than would fit on my Weber, so I froze one whole brisket flat after the spice crust was applied.  A week later, I thawed it for two days in the fridge and I smoked and braised it today.  Because of time constraints, I cut the flat into two pieces, smoked them for about four hours and braised them for about two hours.  They turned out just as good as the fresh batch last week

The Challah was made using the tried-and-true Maggie Glezer’s “My Challah” recipe.

The sandwiches were excellent (though I prefer rye around my pastrami).  My wife adored it.  So it was a success.  I turned away when she put Mayo and iceberg lettuce on her pastrami sandwich.

Glenn

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