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A Variation on SFBI’s Walnut-Raisin Sourdough (with Pecans and Cranberries)

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GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

A Variation on SFBI’s Walnut-Raisin Sourdough (with Pecans and Cranberries)

It’s been almost two years since brother David shared with us the formula for Walnut-Raisin Sourdough from San Francisco Baking Institute (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21289/walnut-raisin-sourdough-bread-sfbi-artisan-ii).   I’ve made this bread three or four time times, but it’s been a long time.  Too long.  So I baked a couple little loaves yesterday.

This bread is essentially a pain de campagne with some toasted walnuts and raisins.  It has a nice semi-chewy crumb and a crispy crust, and wonderful complex flavor.  It’s also—for some reason—one of the best smelling breads I know.  My spouse and I prefer pecans to walnuts, and I used a combination of dried cranberries and golden raisins.  The bread is delicious all by itself, but is even splendider with some cream cheese.

I used Central Milling Organic Artisan Baker’s Choice white flour, Central Milling’s Organic Hi-Protein Fine Whole Wheat flour and Bob’s Red Mill Dark Rye flour.  The formula is shown below.

 The dough was just a tad underproofed.  So the bread was a tad underpoofed.

Pecan-Cranberry-Raisin Sourdough (Variation on SFBI Formula)

Total Formula

 

 

 

Ingredients

Baker's %

Wt (g)

(2 @ 550g)

Wt (g)

(3 @ 550g)

  AP flour

71.57

383

574

  Whole Wheat flour

19.77

106

160

  Dark Rye flour

8.66

46

69

Water

67.62

362

543

Pecans (toasted)

15.81

85

130

Raisins and/or Cranberries (soaked)

19.77

106

160

Salt

2.13

11

17

Total

206.41

1100

1653

 

Levain

 

 

 

Ingredients

Baker's %

Wt (g)

 (for 2 loaves

Wt (g)

(for 3 loaves

AP flour

95

77

114

Dark Rye flour

5

4

6

Water

50

40

60

Stiff Starter

60

48

72

Total

210

169

254

      Mix all ingredients until well incorporated.

      Ferment 12 hrs at room temperature.

       

Final Dough

 

 

 

Ingredients

Baker's %

Wt (g)

(2 @ 550g)

Wt (g)

(3 @ 550g)

AP flour

65

275

412

Whole Wheat flour

25

106

160

Dark Rye flour

10

42

63

Water

72

305

457

Yeast (dry instant)

0.1

0.4

0.6

Pecans (toasted)

25

85

130

Raisins and/or Cranberries (soaked)

20

106

160

Salt

2.7

11

17

Levain

40

169

254

Total

259.8

1100

 

Procedure

      Mix the flours and the water to a shaggy mass. Cover tightly and autolyse for 45-75 minutes.  Desired dough temperature: 78-80F.

      Toast the pecans, broken into large pieces, for 10 minutes at 325ºF. (Can be done ahead of time)

      Soak the raisins/cranberries in cold water. (Can be done ahead of time)

      Add the salt, yeast and levain and mix at Speed 1 until well incorporated (about 2 minutes).

      Mix at Speed 2 to moderate gluten development (about 8 minutes).

      Add the nuts and raisins (well-drained) and mix at Speed 1 until they are well-distributed in the dough.

      Transfer to a lightly floured board and knead/fold a few times if necessary to better distribute the nuts and raisins.

      Round up the dough and transfer to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover tightly.

      Ferment for 2 – 2 ½  hours at 70ºF.

      Divide the dough into two equal pieces. Pre-shape as boules. Let the pieces relax for 20-30 minutes, covered.

      Shape as bâtards or boules and place, seam side up. In bannetons or en couche. Cover well.

      Proof for 1.5 to 2 hours.

      An hour before baking, pre-heat oven to 500ºF with baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

      Transfer the loaves to a peel. Score them. Transfer to the baking stone.

      Turn the oven down to 450ºF and bake for 15 minutes with steam, then another 12 minutes in a dry oven. (Boules may take a few more minutes to bake than bâtards.)  Done when internal temperature is 205 F.

      When the loaves are done, turn off the oven but leave the loaves on the baking stone with the oven door ajar for another 8-10 minutes.

      Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack.

      Cool (almost) completely before slicing.  (The loaves are still slightly warm after 60 minutes).

      **********

Enjoy!

Glenn

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Glenn.  Very nice 'lift' as Phil would say.  Beautiful crust and crumb.

Nice baking inside and out.

 

 

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Glenn

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Nice loaves Glenn. I made the original recipe last week to take to Las Vegas. I hadn't made it since shortly after taking the Artisan II course. Has it really been two years? Yikes!

David

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

As the frogs say, "time's fun when you're having flies".

This bread is so good, I don't know why we waited so long between bakes.

I'm sure your grandkids will enjoy it.

Glenn

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm with you on the pecans.  Anything with pecans has to be good in my book.  I'm in North Carolina for the holiday and have to stock up on the Cracker Barrel pecan logs....my favorite thing in the world!

beautiful bread with a great crust and crumb.

Ian

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

I love pecans, too.  This bread would also be a good vehicle for other fruits and nuts ...maybe seeds too.

Glenn

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Looks like the perfect loaf for Turkey sandwiches! :)  Beautiful bake, and thanks for sharing the formula.

gabryl's picture
gabryl

Looks wonderful Glen. I made the one in Hamelman's book (Sourdough Rye with Walnuts and Raisins) which is a 30% rye made from rye starter rather than a pain au levain type of starter which seems to be your beautiful variant.

In attempt to prolong the keeping quality I used also full fat dry milk (3% baker's %), but I have always got a really dry crumb after just 2 days.

I am wondering whether you or David have tried the Hamelman version and can comment on the difference in keeping qualities and eating qualities?

Thanks and well done again on a yummy looking bake :)

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Gabryl--

This bread stays moist moderately well.  After two days, it can still be enjoyed without toasting, but it's better toasted.  If you want a fruit-nut bread that stays moist, try adding nuts and fruit to the Hamelman Five-Grain Levain.  The soaker really helps that bread retain its moistness.

Thanks for the comment.

Glenn

gabryl's picture
gabryl

Thanks for the suggestion Glen, I suspected that and I was thinking I would like to use a soaker of some sort like cracked (kibbled) rye or linseed.

Also I will replace the high-gluten flour with the baker's flour as I found the crumb was too dry for my taste.

Thanks for the reply! 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yum, Glenn! How appropriate for fall/winter. I've never used walnut with raisins in bread before, shame on me!

yours looks truly inspiring. I'll have to try it. 

Khalid