The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

dabrownman's blog

  • Pin It
dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After seeing Karin’s (Hanseata) great post with her take on Maria Speck’s  Aroma Bread here:  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32830/aroma-bread-love-story

 

We knew that we would have to move it to the top of the baking list before anything else got baked.  My apprentice immediately knew this was her kind of bread – 100% whole grains, soakers for a majority of the flours, includes the oddball cornmeal and some Toadies, a scald for the whole berries, seeds galore with multi-versions of SD starters and commercial yeast.

  

We, of course, decided to go all with the seeds getting around to 11 different ones not including the 3 whole grain seed soaker (making a total of 14).  Some seeds like the coriander, anise, brown and black caraway and fennel were aromatics to spice the bread.

 

Other seeds like; cracked brown and golden flax, black and white sesame, pumpkin and sunflower seeds make the bread healthy and meaty when combined with the spelt, whole wheat, and rye scalded whole berries.

 

We strayed from Karin’s bake in some minor ways.  We used the berry soaker water for much of the liquid,  had a few more and different seeds here and there.  We added our new very vigorous WW starter in place of rye sour one Karin used and used a poolish in place of the commercial yeast.  We added WW to the scald, tossed in some toadies and VWG since these flours have so little and also used more rye in place of some of the spelt. 

 

We did 10 minutes of slap and folds after everything except the sesds and scald came together to work up the gluten and then did (4) S&F’s on 15 minute increments ,to incorporated the seeds and scald.  After 1 hour of fermentation on the counter we bulk retarded the dough for 8 hours in the fridge.

 

After warming up again on the counter for 1 1/2 hours the next morning and using the time to soak the clay baker, we shaped the loaf to fit an oval  Romertopf and let it proof for 2 hours until it more than doubled.  You might want to let yours be slightly under double so you get the oven spring we didn’t get.  Well, at least it didn’t collapse.

 

We warmed the oven to 450 F with a stone below and above the rack that the cold clay baker would do its thing on.  We covered the top of the loaf with our tri colored, poppy seeds for a final touch, covered with the lid and steamed the bread for 25 minutes,  We then removed the lid, turned down the temperature to 425 F convection and let it bake another 20 minutes rotating the Romertopf every 5 minutes.

At the 45 minute mark the bread hit 200 F and we turned off the oven, leaving the bread inside, until it hit 205 F - 5 minutes later, when we removed the bread to a cooling rack.  It was very aromatic, boldly brown., crispy but not sporting a blistered crust.

We can already tell that we will love this bread and will know for sure as soon as we can cut into it and give it a taste.  It has another top 5 rating hanging over it I’m guessing.  As a side note we have another nearly identical bake planned with the exception that; we will bake it like a pumpernickel to see which one we like better and it will have yeast water  and Rye Sour levain in place of the WW SD and poolish used for this bake.

I can't stop eating this bread.  Plain or toasted with butter  - just fantastic.  We love the deep flavor, the aroma of the toasted spice seeds,  the nuttiness of the toasted more meaty seeds that give the soft crumb its chew.  This is a great bread adn one i am so glad that Karin posted.  It''s different  than her Wild Rice Bread and, to my liking, a tad better and I love the Wild Rice Bread.  It would be very difficult to craft a healthier bread too.  Can't wait to have a sandwich made with it tomorrow for lunch.  This bread is why I bake and put up with my apprentice....You have to try it.

She's a tuckered doggie just waiting for the sunset.

Couldn't wait for lunch.  We had to have tomorrow's lunch tonight for dinner - a wise choice !

 

 

Formula

Poolish & WW SD  Levain

Build 1

%

WW SD Starter

25

4.37%

Whole Wheat

115

52.27%

Water

115

52.27%

Total

255

115.91%

Flour and water is split between the poolish and WWSD levain

 

 

 

Poolish & WW SD  Levain

 

%

Flour

127.5

57.95%

Water

127.5

57.95%

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

14.48%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Dark Rye

100

45.45%

Spelt

120

54.55%

Dough Flour

220

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.75%

Soaker Water for Dough

218

99.09%

Dough Hydration

99.09%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

571.5

 

Soaker Water and Water

513.5

 

T. Dough Hydration

89.85%

 

Whole Grain %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

83.97%

 

Total Weight

1,761

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

VWG

20

9.09%

Toadies

20

9.09%

Bicolor Sesame, Bicolor Cracked Flax

40

18.18%

Pumpkin and Sunflower Seeds

40

18.18%

W&B Caraway, Anise, Coriander, Fennel

15

6.82%

Total

135

61.36%

 

 

 

Multigrain Flour Soaker

 

%

Coarse Cornmeal

57

25.91%

Rye

75

34.09%

Spelt

92

41.82%

Water

168

76.36%

Total Flour Soaker

392

178.18%

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

WW Berries

46

20.91%

Rye Berries

46

20.91%

Spelt Berrries

47

21.36%

Total Scald

139

63.18%

 

 

 

Weight of scald is after draining - pre scald weight was 25 g each. White, brown ad black poppy seeds were used as a top garnish.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The past 2 years we have been making an Easter Babka and this year the GMA’s decided to make it their Easter Bake (along with Hot Cross Buns), so naturally, we had to join them  for the Babka Rhamma Dhamma.  Ca't wat to see their Easter Babka Bakes!

 

This year we decided to do the traditional 2 sided roll up and then do a Twisted Sisters twist of the double roll.   We made the dough without the pumpkin pie spices to try to get a more chocolate flavor coming through and now consider the spices ‘optional’.

  

Once again we used our trusty Bundt pan to contain things and give the top a decorative look.  We increased the size of the bake to fill the Bundt pan up to maximum capacity, and a little more, since this Polish and Russian inspired babka is so tasty and goes so fast.

 

Like last year, we used walnuts, cocoa, chocolate chips and bourbon snockered fruits for the filling, dropped the pie spices but added brown sugar to this year’s roll up and add in goodies.  We did increase all of them to account for the larger babka.  We kept the streusel topping on the top and bottom of the loaf for the nice crunch and we kept the vanilla, powdered sugar milk glaze for the top.  This year we added a dusting of powdered sugar too.

  

This year, instead of just yeast water making the dough rise, we added in a large poolish too.  Each was  brought to peak, fed again and then refrigerated for 2 days.  We let the levains double on the counter after removing them from the fridge - about 4 hours.

  

We re-hydrated non fat dry milk powder for the dough liquid and used it to autolyse the dough dry ingredients for an hour.  After mixing in the levains with a spoon we did 10 minutes of slap and folds to get the gluten developed, before allowing the dough to rest for 15 minutes.

 

We did 2 sets of S&F’s, on 30 minute intervals, to develop the dough further.  After another 15 minute rest we rolled out the dough a little less than ½” thick and into a huge rectangle 24” x 36”.  Half the butter in the formula is in the dough and the other half is softened and schmeared onto the rolled out dough before the rest of the fillings go in.  After sprinkling on the fillings in an even layer, then roll it up, from each wide side, meeting in the middle.

 

The starting in the middle, twist the roll toward each end to get the Twisted Sister part of the design.  The roll will get longer but no worries, you need the length to get around the Bundt pan twice.   Spray the pan liberally so nothing will stick, place half the streusel in the bottom of the pan and then coil in the Twisted Sister going around twice and ending where you began to ensure that the babka stays level as it rises.

 

Sprinkle the top with the rest of the streusel cover with oiled plastic and allow to proof on the counter for 1 hour before refrigerating overnight.   In the morning allow the babka to come to room temperature and finish proofing 1” above the rim of the pan.  Fire up the oven to 350 F convection and bake until golden brown and the inside temperature reaches 205 F - about 55 minutes.  Rotate the pan every 10 minutes to ensure even browning.

 

Remove pan to a cooling rack and allow to cool for 10 minutes before un-molding.  I run a paring knife around the outside and inside to make sure the babka comes away clean.  After 5 more minutes of cooling drizzle the vanilla glaze over the top and dust with powdered sugar.  Eat at least one slice while still warm otherwise warm up I the micro wave before serving.

 

This is a real Easter treat!  We love this for breakfast, brunch or dinner desert!  Nothing is overpowering or too sweet and the lack of PP spices really let the chocolate and walnuts shine through.

Happy Easter !

Formula

Poolish & YW Levain

Build 1

%

 

 

Pinch of AD Yeast

0

0.00%

 

 

AP

150

12.20%

 

 

Whole Wheat

150

12.20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water

115

0.18699187

 

 

Water

150

24.39%

 

 

Total Starter

565

48.78%

 

 

Flour is split between the two levains

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poolish & YW Levain

 

%

 

 

Flour

300

48.78%

 

 

Water

265

43.09%

 

 

Hydration

88.33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

24.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

W W Pastry Flour

140

22.76%

 

 

AP

475

77.24%

 

 

Dough Flour

615

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.63%

 

 

Rehydrated Non Fat Milk

382

62.11%

 

 

Dough Hydration

62.11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

915

 

 

 

Milk and Water

647

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

70.71%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

31.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

81.14%

 

 

 

Total Weight

2,280

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Butter 50 + 50

100

16.26%

 

 

Honey

50

8.13%

 

 

VWG

10

1.63%

 

Brown Sugar 40 Cocoa 20

60

9.76%

 

 

Walnuts 70, Chocolate Chips 130

200

32.52%

 

 

Sugar

25

4.07%

 

 

Re-hydrated Snockered Fruits

185

30.08%

After Snockering

 

Egg (2 medium)

78

12.68%

 

 

Total Add ins

708

115.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Optional Spices

 

 

 

 

1 tsp each Cinnamon and Nutmeg

 

 

 

 

1/2 tsp each Ginger, Allspice

 

 

 

 

1/4 tsp Cloves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Struesel

 

 

 

 

1/8 C each of Walnut Maple Granola, APF flour

 

 

 

Sugar and Butter cut in with PP Spices.

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Baking with the 3 GMA’s again this week for Easter where hot cross buns and babka are on the list.  Good Friday is Hot Cross Bun Day and we decided to make an overnight poolish for the buns and a small 200 g YW dough for the crosses.  The crosses were only 12.5% whole grains trying to make them a shade lighter in color than the buns.

  

We did 2 sets of S&F’s over 40 minutes to incorporate the bourbon re-hydrated dried; apricots, cranberries and raisins and then let the dough ferment for 1 hour. 

 

For the crosses we mixed 100 g of YW with 100 g of AP and 25 G of WW with 20 g of sugar and let this ferment on the counter2 hours before the bun dough came together.  We later added 2 g of salt to the mix before final proof of the cross dough.

 

After the bulk ferment the dough was divided into (4) 150 g pieces and (6) roughly 70 pieces.  The larger pieces were further divided into 4 balls that were placed into ramekins to make clover leaf rolls and make natural seams for the crosses to be placed.  The 70 g rolls were placed into muffing tins where the crossed were laid on top.  

 

Final proofing of the rolls took 6 hours on the counter before the crosses were placed on top, egg wash applied and placed into the 450 F mini oven with one of Sylvia’s steaming cups.  We baked the muffin tins first followed by the ramekins as the 2nd batch.

After 8 minutes the steam came out and the mini oven was turned down to 425 F, convection this time.  The tins baked for 7 minutes more – 15 minutes total and the ramekins baked for an additional 3 minutes - 18 minutes total.

We juiced ¼ of a lemon onto ¼ C of powdered sugar, stirred and then micro waved the mix for 30 seconds to clarify the glaze.   The buns were un-molded onto a cooling rack as soon as they came out of the oven and then the glaze was brushed on the entire top of the buns while still hot.

These turned out well as a desert roll, warm with butter, and made fine French toast the next morning too.  They are worth the work to make them at least one day a year.

Formula

Poolish

Build 1

%

 

 

Pinch of AD Yeast

0

0.00%

 

 

AP

50

12.50%

 

 

Whole Wheat

50

12.50%

 

 

Water

100

25.00%

 

 

Total Starter

200

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poolish

 

%

 

 

Flour

100

25.00%

 

 

Water

100

25.00%

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

19.65%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Whole Wheat

40

10.00%

 

 

Whole spelt

40

10.00%

 

 

AP

320

80.00%

 

 

Dough Flour

400

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.00%

 

 

Water Weight Only + 1/3 C NFDMP

200

50.00%

 

 

Dough Hydration

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

500

 

 

 

Milk and water

300

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

60.00%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

26.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

68.70%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Butter

30

7.50%

 

 

Sugar

30

7.50%

 

 

Snockered Fruits

100

25.00%

After Snockering Weight

Egg

50

12.50%

 

 

Total

210

52.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/4 tsp each Cinnamon and Nutmeg

 

 

 

 

1/8 tsp each Ginger, Allspice

 

 

 

 

1/16 tsp Cloves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW cross dough was 100 g of YW, 100 g of AP and 25 g of WW

 

 

with 20 g of sugar and 3 g of salt.

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Had to get the matzoh done in time to make gefilte fish and Matzoh Ball soup.  My apprentice ave the chicken stock simmering away and has 10 tubs of smaltz in the freezer.  Now for more time:-)

Have a good Passover everyone!

Home made Gefilte  Fish - my personal favorite.  Wrapped in collard green and cabbage, covered with onion and carrot and then the fish stock goes in to cover.  Even though I sold Kosher for 20 years from all the manufacturers, and theya re great folks - make your own matzoh, fish , matzoh balls.   Can't buy anything close. 

Yes, Brownmen like their Matzoh's to be on the brown side:-)

The balls will expand greatly so don't crowd the pot.

See how much they puffed?  They floated in 30 seconds like good little matzoh balls should.

Have a nice Passover Seder!

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

For the 2nd test of our new 2 week old WW starter, we though we would continue our 100% whole grain quest to a 3rd bake, similar to the last 2, but making a few changes along the way as my apprentice usually does.  She just can’t leave well enough, or me either for that matter, alone.

 

We decided to add in some YW to the mix to help open the crumb of the planned pumpernickel baking temperature and schedule.  We also decided to change from a 100% whole wheat, 100% whole grain bread to one that was still 100% whole grain but had equal portions of WW, Spelt and Rye.  We omitted the VWG on this bake.

   

We also added some barley malt syrup and cut the molasses in half and throw in some bread spices consisting of; black and brown caraway, coriander, anise and fennel.  To keep in line with the change in whole grains we also changed the whole berry scald to match it using WW, Spelt and Rye.

  

The resulting overall hydration of 87.5% is fairly in the middle of the pumpernickel hydrations we do around here in AZ where it is so dry all time.  The method was pretty straight forward if a tiny bit unusual.   We built the whole wheat combo SD YW levain together over (2) 4 hour builds where it easily doubled.

  

After a 1 hour autolyse that had everything in it but the levain and scald, we mixed the levain and the autolyse together with a spoon and then did 10 minutes of slap and folds trying to develop as much gluten as we could = what fun.  We then folded in the scald berries with a bench knife.

 

 Once the berries were evenly distributed, we tossed the paste into a large bread pan filling it about 3/4th full.  The paste filled the pan fuller than we would normally like for pumpernickel but, my apprentice was lazy and refused to pull it out, divide it and put into two smaller cocktail pans.

 

 She did, to be fair, reminded me that the Altus loaf at 300 G lsss in size actually shrank the last time leaving the finished bread 1” below the rim of this same pan.  We dusted the loaf with oat bran and let it ferment on the counter for an hour before it went into the fridge covered in plastic, for a 16 hour retard.

 

It's a little more dense and moist on the bottom.

It had risen to the top of the pan when it came out of the fridge the next morning when it went into a plastic bag to warm up and do final proof on a heating pad for 3 hours.  Since the bread would eventually rise almost an inch above the pan rim, we decided to bake it low and slow; pumpernickel style, in the WagnerWare, MagnaLite turkey roaster with the trivet inside so extra water could be added to steam the loaf.

The temperature reducing (as time goes on) baking schedule follows:

400 F - 30 minutes

375 F - 30 minutes

350 F - 30 minutes

325 F - 30 minutes

300 F - 1 hour

275 F - 2 hours

250 F - 2 hours

225 F - 1 ½ hours

200 F - 1 ½ hours

We had a powerful sunset last night

When the bread tests 205 F in the center, turn off the oven and leave the bread in the DO inside the oven for 8 -12 hours.  We did 8 hours and the oven was still warm in the morning due to the two baking stones on the top and bottom rack of the oven.

The 3 P sandwich - DaPumpernickel, Pepperjack and Pate

Yes, it is a long bake but worth it in the end if you want to make a classic pumpernickel style loaf.  Not that this one is a classic, since it isn't 100% rye, have cornmeal, potatoes or bacon fat in it.  But this sure tastes like a pumpernickel even if it doesn't really use classic pumpernickel flours and uses an Irish Stout for much of the liquid. That’s the great thing about bread – there aren't any real rules, especially if you choose not to follow them like my apprentice.  This bread smell tremendous with the caramelized grains, scald and aromatic seeds.

Love the first one so much we made a variant - DaPumpernickel, Irish Swiss and Pate open face

Sadly, even after it cools you don’t want to slice it for at least 32 hours.  Just wrap it on linen or cotton and be as patient as you need to be…. We love pumpernickel and do not mind waiting, as long as, we win the Power Ball tonight for over $320 plus million.  Well we didn't win the big moola drawing but we still won a jackpot none the less.  We took a few slices off the loaf this morning for pictures and breakfast, re-wrapping the rest to let it sit another 24 hours before slicing it.

A close up open face sandwich - in your face:-)

This bread easily sliced 1/4" thick slices even for such a large loaf.  The bread was open and very moist.  It is also about the best tasting example of a non-traditional pumpernickel my German apprentice has ever tasted.  She wanted to take the rest of the loaf outside to bury it in the back yard but I managed to stop her before she got to the doggie door.  It is a powerful bread flavor wise, as much so as last night's sunset,  and we can't wait to try it with some robust red wine, pate, cheese and fruit spread especially after this morning's toasted pumpernickel with butter, egg, hot sausage and bacon delight.    Yummy. 

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Mini's WW Starter

20

0

20

3.28%

Yeast Water

30

0

30

6.00%

Whole Wheat

50

50

100

20.00%

Water

20

40

60

12.00%

Total

90

90

210

42.00%

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

110

22.00%

 

 

Water

100

20.00%

 

 

Hydration

90.91%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Whole Rye

165

33.00%

 

 

Whole Spelt

165

33.00%

 

 

Whole Wheat

170

34.00%

 

 

Dough Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

 

 

Guinness

423

84.60%

 

 

Dough Hydration

84.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

610

 

 

 

Guinness, YW & SD Starter Water

523

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

85.74%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

87.50%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

Caraway, Anise, Fennel & Coriander

16

3.20%

 

 

Toadies

4

0.80%

 

 

Barley malt

16

3.20%

 

 

Molasses

16

3.20%

 

 

Total

58

11.60%

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After the our take on Ballymaloe’s Brown Bread with Guinness and Biga, turned out so nice for St. Paddy’s Day, we wondered why we haven’t ever seen this bread baked as a sourdough at Ballymaloe?  So we thought we would give it a go with Not Mini's Ancient WW SD Starter that is almost 2 weeks old and nearly tripling after 8 hours now.

  

The starter saga can be found here:

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32665/mini-ovens-no-muss-no-fuss-starter-8-days-laater

The Ballymaloe Brown Bread for St Paddy’s Day can be found here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32718/st-paddy%E2%80%99s-day-feast-sort-ballymaloe-100-ww-brown-bread-and-irish-ruben%E2%80%99s

This bread is just the perfect first loaf for Not Mini’s Ancient WW SD starter, even if only 13 days old and still a baby.

  

Some of the changes we made to the last bake were; upping the levain from 180 g to 240 g to try to account for a starter not quite on its pegs yet, adding a 100g (dry weight) scald since the last bake was crying out for one, replacing the 50 g of soft white wheat in the levain with whole red wheat,  reducing the molasses to 30 g from 45 g to make the bread less sweet, upping the VWG to 20 g from 15 to help out the new starter, adding 3 g each of red and white malt powders and 10 g of Toadies to the mix.  We love Toadies and the added flavor it imparts to the bread.  The hydration ended up 3.5 points lower at 85% due to the more dry add in ingredients and less molasses and nearly 200 g grams heavier than the last Brown Bread bake.

  

We have been reviving the 8 day old near dead and tumor bearing starter from its flour coffin for the past 5 days.   By feeding it straight WW at 100% hydration and refreshing it every 12 hours it has made progress.  We think we have it in good enough shape to try it out on this bread for its first bread.

 

The lid comes off and it had sprung an inch above the rim almost touching the top of the DO lid..

We did 30 minutes of autolyse excepting the levain and the scald.  We also changes the process this time to do 4 sets of S&F’s over 2 hours on 30 minute increments to develop the gluten further and incorporate the scalded berries during the third set and getting them really evenly distributed at the end of the 4th set. 

 

As a final change, we decided to do the bulk ferment and a final proof in a small CI enameled Dutch oven and retard it for 20 hours between the two.  The bulk ferment on the counter was 2 hours.  After taking the DO out of the fridge we let the dough final proof on the counter for 4 hours before putting it into a 425 F oven to steam for 30 minute.

We then took the lid off and turned the oven down to 350 F to bake another 10 minutes before removing the bread from the DO and finish baking it on the oven rack between two stones until it hit 205 F.  We turned the oven off and left the bread on the bottom stone for 10 minutes to crisp the crust with the oven door ajar before removing to a cooling rack. 

The loaf rose well in the fridge during retard and on the heating pad during final proof .  Unlike the previous bake, this loaf sprang well in the oven.  We are glad we decided to bake the loaf this way rather than as a pumpernickel - low and slow.  The crust was dark brown, crisp and glossy when it came out of the oven like DO's put on bread.  It smells very good and my apprentice is very proud of the Not Mini's Ancient SD starter for its first bake at 14 days of age.  It really did its job and some sour came through.

The crumb turned out fairly open, moist and glossy for a 100% whole wheat bread.  It tastes very good and a little tangy.  It isn't as sweet as the biga brown bread from SP Day.We like this one a lot but both are very good in their own way.  Now we have to bake this one like a pumpernickel :-)

Volunteer zinnia  in the front yard.  Everything is blooming in AZ except the cactus which will be very soon.

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Mini's WW Starter

30

0

30

4.80%

Whole Wheat

60

50

110

22.00%

Water

60

40

100

20.00%

Total

150

90

240

48.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

125

25.00%

 

 

Water

115

23.00%

 

 

Hydration

92.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

17.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Whole Wheat

500

100.00%

 

 

Dough Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

 

 

Guinness

423

84.60%

 

 

Dough Hydration

84.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

625

 

 

 

Guinness and SD Starter Water

538

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

86.08%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

84.95%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,338

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Red  Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

White Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

Toadies

10

2.00%

 

 

VW Gluten

20

4.00%

 

 

Molasses

30

6.00%

 

 

Total

66

13.20%

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Traditions get all tied up with the way things used to be but they point to a better future too.  There aren’t too many traditions that are tied to bad things.  No one wants to celebrate them year after year.   Those we try to forget.  But, the good things we want to remember and renew.  St Paddy’s Day is such a tradition and everyone can be Irish one day a year, put on the green and look forward to a better future.

 

Carrying on traditions can also be mean that things don’t change over time and the typical Irish feast is a fine example.  Who doesn’t want corned beef and cabbage, boiled; potato, carrots, celery and onion, a nice brown bread, soda bread or scones and fairy cakes at least once a year?  Next day Irish Ruben’s aren’t bad either.

This year, as we usually do, we mixed things up a little bit with the recipes to renew the tradition by not get stuck in the way things were, a problem with traditions that don’t change with the times - can’t let pride get in the way of progress.

So instead of covering the simmered corned beef in mustard and grilling it to finish we covered it as usual but baked it in the oven to get some color and flavor on it.  Instead of sautéing the cabbage with some garlic in butter and bacon fat, we added Swiss chard   and collard greens to the mix - highly recommended.  In place of scones, we made lemon curd fairy cakes and our take on Ballymaloe’s Yeasted Brown Bread replaced the usual soda bread.  So like all traditions that last, they change to withstand the test of time.

 

Sadly, our daughter Molly couldn’t be with us this year, but she did have Dad email her the recipes from his and her cookbook.  She called to tell me that a lot of important stuff was missing from them too!   She more into the way things are now than the way things were yesterday and so long ago as last year.

 

It’s the bread we want to talk about.  After staying at Ballymaloe for several days so long ago, we had the luxury of having their SD bread, soda breads; brown and white and their famous yeasted brown bread which is far and away our favorite with the sourdough coming in 2nd.  A SD brown bread would be out favorite if they made one.  Looks like a future project for my apprentice?

 

I have never had much luck making this yeasted brown bread as the recipe was originally written.   The recipe had several errors in it that have now been corrected by Darina Allen.  It had 50g too little flour, 150 g too much water and the hydration was 127%, pretty high for a no knead, one rise bread and totally unworable.  She has since changed the recipe adding 50 g of strong flour (now the bread is not 100% whole wheat) and cutting the water down to 425 g from 575g. 

 

The revised recipe can be found here: 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/mar/24/how-to-make-yeast-bread

I’m not into no knead bread and I wanted to keep the recipe 100% whole wheat if I could, plus, I wanted to use Guinness for the water.  I don’t keep packages of yeast around as a general rule but I did have one that had a little bit left in it which I used to make a 180 g 100% hydration biga that had 50 g of home milled soft white wheat in it.

 

Irish whole wheat, which is traditionally used to make this bread, is milled from soft red wheat, something I haven’t found unless online - at exorbitant prices.  So, to try to replicate this flour, I used 50 g of home milled hard red wheat, 150 g of whole wheat pastry flour and 300 g of store bough whole wheat flour.  With the soft white in the biga and the pastry flour we added 15 g of VWG to help this bread out with its lack of gluten.

 

The Irish Ruben - Kerrygold Irish Swiss cheese and butter for panini, home made Dijon mustard, corned beef with sauteed cabbage, Swiss chard and collard greens  just yummy with the usual veggies and fruit assortment.

You always want to buy Guinness in the can since Guinness travels so poorly.  The can is the only way to get anywhere close to what you get in Dublin out of the tap.  It has a small plastic CO2 canister in each can that lets loose its bubbles when you pop the top to ensure you get the proper stoving that Guinness is so famous for when poured,  as the bubbles work their way back to the top to make the head.

Since one can of Guinness is 14.9 oz or 423 g that is what we used for the 2 hour autolyse.  With the 100% hydro biga and the 84.5% autolyse, the 45 g of molasses (6 times more than Darina’s recipe) and 15 g of VWG we ended up with just the right amount of liquid at 88.51% hydration to allow us to do a nice set of French slap and folds to incorporate the biga into the autolyse and develop the gluten.  Plan on doing 10 minutes of slap and folds to get the dough in shape, eventually the dough will come around.

Once the dough had rested for 10 minutes after being slapped around, we divided it into 3 portions, did some S&F’s to get it tight and then made 3 little boules to fit in the large loaf tin.  You can see from the picture that the dough did not fill the tin even half full - Irish tins are smaller just like the leprichauns that make them - so have your apprentice make a 12% larger amout of dough next time like i will.  I wasn’t paying attention and let the dough proof 1/2 “ past the top of the tin, instead of  just under the top of the tin so it was over proofed and there wasn’t any oven spring as a result.

It took 8 hours on the counter to get it over proofed - so 7 hours would have been better.  We also thought that we would bake the tin in a hot MagnaWare oval turkey roaster with 1/8 C of extra water under the trivet.  We preheated the roaster at 425 F until the oven beep went off saying it was at temperature and then 5 minutes later removed the roaster from the oven, put the tin inside, topped with the lid and put it back in the oven for 20 minutes of aided self steaming.

We removed the tin from the roaster and put it on the oven rack and turned the oven down to 350 F, convection this time.  We removed the bread from the tin 10 minutes later and placed the bread upside down directly on the oven rack for 10 more minutes.  When it hit 205 F on the inside, it was removed to the cooling rack.  The oven had a stone on the top and the bottom of the oven to regulate the heat properly.

We like the way this bread tastes and isn't far off the Ballymaloe version from a taste point of view.  Even though my apprentice over proofed it, the crumb was glossy, open and mildly sweet.  The crust was crispy, probably due to the DO, but went softer as it cooled.  No wonder this is the bread Ballymaloe is famous for baking and serving to their guests!  Will post the Irish Rubens here after we make them for lunch.  Happy St. Patrick;s Day to All Fresh Lofians everywhere.

Formula

Biga

Build 1

%

Yeast

0.25

0.04%

Soft White Wheat

50

10.00%

Whole Wheat

40

8.00%

Water

90

18.00%

Total Starter

180.25

36.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biga

 

%

Flour

90.125

18.03%

Water

90.125

18.03%

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.38%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole Wheat

350

70.00%

Whole Wheat Pastry Flour

150

30.00%

Dough Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

Guinness

423

84.60%

Dough Hydration

84.60%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

590.125

 

Water

513.125

 

T. Dough Hydration

86.95%

 

Whole Grain %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

88.51%

 

Total Weight

1,172

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

VW Gluten

15

3.00%

Molasses

45

9.00%

Total

60

12.00%

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Wouldn't you know it......another year of clean living and the Irish Fairies stopped by to leave a St Patrick's Day surprise again this year!  Wish The Leprechauns would take notice and follow the Frairy's lead !  Used Rachel  Allen's lemon curd recipe and froze it for a year .......Fairies love lemon curd with some age on it.    The cake is a lemon sponge with cake flour.  I saw the Fairies tossing their dust on them before disappearing till next year.

Happy St. Paddy's Day

For our Irish native from Belfast -  Sylvia.  I can't remember where I got the  cup cake recipe.

Lemon Curd

2 eggs and 1 yolk

1 stick of butter

¾ C sugar

zest and juice of 3 lemons.

Mix and slowly heat on top of the stove in 2 qt sauce pan until mix thickens into thick curd.  Put in refrigerator for 4 hours to thicken further.

 Irish Lemon Curd Fairy Cakes

  • 5 egg yolks
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel - 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice - half a lemon
  • 5 egg whites
  • 2/3 cup sifted cake flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 16 oz lemon curd
  • 1/4 cup powdered sugar
Method

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Grease and flour 20 muffin cups.

Beat egg yolks till thick with a whisk in a bowl. Gradually add 1/3 cup sugar in several stages beating continually.

Whisk in the lemon peel and juice.

Beat the egg whites utill soft peaks form.   Then gradually add remaining 1/3 cup sugar and beat till stiff peaks form.  I use a hand mixer for this

Gently fold the whites into the yolks.

Sift together cake flour and salt and gently  fold into egg mixture.

Fill muffin cups 2/3rds full.  Bake at 375 F for 10 minutes, rotate the cupcake pans and turn down the oven to 325 F convection this time and bake about 5 minutes more until the tops are nicely browned.

Remove cakes from tins and cool completely on a wire rack.

Use a sharp paring knife to cut into the top center of each cupcake, removing the cone shaped piece and reserve.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The quest for the New Your bagel continues.   This time we lowered the hydration 2% to 56%, used more barley malt, used 27% whole grains (the bulk of which was whole wheat in the dough flour to try to mimic first clear flour) and we used AP with VWG since we didn’t have any bread flour.

  

We also changed the process around a little bit too.  We built a full strength SD starter out of whole grains, stiffened it up to 65% and then let it sit in the fridge for 3 days to get sour.  Then we built a levain from that using 15 g of seed and whole grain spelt, rye and WW.  We made the yeast waster levain separately and replaced the whole spelt with AP flour.

 

Once the two levains had doubled, the SD levain was placed into the bottom of the container and the YW levain was put on top of that and they were placed in the fridge together for 2 days.

The levains were removed from the fridge to warm up.  While they warming we autolysed the rest of the ingredients, including; the salt, malts and VWG for 2 hours after having kneaded them together.  Dough like this would kill the KA so hand kneading is always the wiser choice but a hard slog.

After the levains hit the autolyse it took a while to work then in the hard dough by squeezing it through the fingers.  Then we kneaded the dough until it was tough but silky smooth.  After a 1 hour rest we shaped the bagels around the knuckles at 135 g each and put them on semolina dusted parchment where they rested for 1hour before gong into the fridge for a 32 hour retard.

  

Sorry, cut into one for a taste while they were still quite warm.

After coming out of the fridge, we let the bagels proof on the counter for 4 hours.  The bagels doubled over that time and then we refrigerated them again for 1 ½ hours to stiffen them up.  Next time we will put them back in the fridge after 3 hours and let them cool for 2.  The bagels were gently boiled for 30 seconds each side, in water that had barley malt and baking soda in it, just to shock them awake. 

 

Bagel hole?  Made a little dough ball for floating to see if the bagels were ready to boil and that they too would float!

They were flipped on a kitchen towel to get rid of the excess water and then dunked into the seed mixture.  The 3 mixes this time were white, brown and black poppy, white and black sesame and a multi-seed and salt one comprised of the previous seeds plus oregano and basil seeds, black and brown caraway seeds, nigella seeds and kosher salt.  We made twice as many of the combo salt ones since they are our favorite.

 

Looks and cuts better when fully cooled,

The steam was supplied by 1 of Sylvia’s steaming pans and a 12” skillet with lava rocks and we used both stones to accommodate the 13 bagels and 1 small roll.   They baked with steam at 450 F for 8 minutes and then steam was removed and they baked for another 8 minutes at 425 F convection until they were deemed done and nicely browned.

Beautiful skies don't have to be sunsets or sunrises.  The sunset was great too!

After deflating in the boil they managed to puff themselves back up nicely in the steam.  These are getting very close to NY SD Bagels and would be way sourer without the YW in the mix to tone it down.  The blistered crust is crispy, the crumb chewy but the taste is near spot on too.  Even my wife is having one for breakfast today instead of Einstein’s.  Now that takes some doing.  We like this batch very much but will make some changes next time as we always do still searching for the perfect bagel that doesn’t exist.

I never eat two bagels at once but did when they came out of the oven yesterday - yummy!  Cream cheese schmear and buttered with minneola marmalade.

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

15

1.34%

Spelt

18

1.80%

Whole Wheat

30

3.00%

Dark Rye

30

3.00%

Water

60

6.00%

Total Starter

153

12.90%

 

 

 

YW Starter

Build 1

%

Yeast Water

58

5.80%

AP

18

1.80%

WW

18

1.80%

Dark Rye

18

1.80%

Total

112

11.20%

 

 

 

Starters

 

%

Flour

115.5

11.55%

Water

125.5

12.55%

Hydration

108.66%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.22%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole Wheat

200

20.00%

AP

800

80.00%

Dough Flour

1,000

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

18

1.80%

Water

500

50.00%

Dough Hydration

50.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

1,115.5

 

Water

625.5

 

T. Dough Hydration

56.07%

 

Whole Grain %

27.57%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

56.27%

 

Total Weight

1,823

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Rye Malt

5

0.50%

White Rye Malt

5

0.50%

VW Gluten

18

1.80%

Barley Malt

36

3.60%

Total

64

6.40%

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

With David Snyder recent post of his new take on SFSD with higher amounts of Semolina and Ian’s new bread with semolina, it was only natural that another semolina bread would fit in this week. This one had a small amount of Desert Semolina - 150g.  We wanted to see if the high gluten, not just protein, claims were true.

  

The bread has 35% whole grains that included millet, another yellow grain and Kamut a durum variety that has a yellow cast too.  We didn’t want the whole grains to take away from the yellow crumb color we were shooting for the Desert Durum.  The small amount of honey was there to sweeten the non yellow AP flour since the yellow ones are pretty sweet all by theselves.

  

This bread was leavened with combination yeast water and mainly whole grain SD starters.   For the liquid in the dough we used the left over soaker water from our last 100% whole grain pumpernickel bread.  We added some ricotta cheese in keeping with this Altamura shape and Italian leanings of this bread – plus we are growing to like cheese in bread and the moisture it imparts to the crumb.

  

Since the color of the dough was yellow we thought green add ins would be appropriate and included pumpkin seeds and pistachios along with some millet seeds.  This bread isn’t as complex as some of the others we bake but it wasn’t meant to be since this is about as white a bread as we usually get around to making and we were getting low on white …..eeerrrr….yellow bread.

  

 

The levains were built separately over two builds and 8 hours.  The SD portion has spent a few days in the fridge before the final build to get it nice and sour.  The method is similar to or recent bakes but only this time only a 1hour autolyse, with the salt, was used.  We did 10 minutes of slap and folds until the dough was silky smooth and the gluten well developed. 

  

We incorporated the add ins on the first of 3 S&F’s which were done 15 minutes apart.  After 1 hour of ferment on the counter, the dough was bulk retarded for 14 hours.  In the morning it was allowed to warm up o the heating pad for 2 hours.  It was then shaped Altamura style but once again, it came out too long for the 12” mini oven so we folded each end under to shorten the shaped dough without having to redo it all.

 

After a 2 hour final proof on the heating pad, we started up the mini oven for preheat with the bottom of the broiler pan 1/4 full of water.   The bread was baked at 450 F with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups on the top of the broiler pan with the dough.   After 12 minutes we removed all of the steam and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.

 

After 5 minutes 3we flipped the bread over on its top  to brownnthe bottom since the bread had sprung well and the top was getting done before the bottom,  5 minutes later we turned the oven down to 400 F convection androtated the bread 180 degrees.  5 minutes later we flipped the bread over and continued to bake for another 5 minutes until the bread reached 205 F on the inside.  All total the bread baked 32 minutes 12 with steam.

  

The bread crust came out that usual durum color.  It was nicely brown, blistered  and crispy that went soft as it cooled.  The crumb was fairly open but not as much as we expected with the nice rise during proof and the spring in the oven under steam.  Still, it was very soft, moist and airy with the green and brown splotches of the pistachio and pumpkin and the yellow millet bits that stayed crunchy.

Can’t really makeout the ricotta cheese but the soft moistness of it was left behind.  This bread reminds me of bread with cream cheese in it.   We like the taste of this bread and it made a fine sandwich for a late lunch today.  We will be making a version of the bread again.

Formula 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Whole Grain SD Starter

10

 

10

1.63%

Spelt

15

15

30

4.88%

Dark Rye

15

15

30

4.88%

AP

50

 

100

16.26%

Yeast Water

50

 

50

8.13%

Water

30

 

80

13.01%

Total

170

30

300

48.78%

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

165

26.83%

 

 

Water

135

21.95%

 

 

Starter Hydration

81.82%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.52%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Kamut

78

12.68%

 

 

Semolina

125

20.33%

 

 

Millet

47

7.64%

 

 

AP

200

32.52%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

450

73.17%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.46%

 

 

Dough Soaker Water

350

56.91%

 

 

Dough Hydration w/ Starter

77.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Pumpkin Seeds

50

8.13%

 

 

Ricotta Cheese

130

21.14%

 

 

Pistachio

50

8.13%

 

 

Honey

5

0.81%

 

 

Millet

50

8.13%

 

 

Total

285

46.34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

615

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

485

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

79.27%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,394

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

34.96%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ricotta Cheese not included inhydration calculations.

 

 

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - dabrownman's blog