The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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dabrownman

My wife asked for a sandwich loaf that was made with whole grain, mainly whole wheat and a tiny bit of sweetness supplied by honey.  She wants a replacement for her old favorite Oroweat Whole Wheat.

 

She doesn’t like sprouts or seeds or soakers in her bread which makes it easier if more boring.  So we came up with a loaf she can take for lunch every day and not be forced to read the ingredient label that scares folks to death.

  

The whole grains include home ground whole; wheat, spelt and kamut with more emphasis on wheat.  Since wheat would be the dominate flour, we decided to use our Desem starter that is fed only whole wheat and tends to produce bread that is less sour and more sweet than our rye sour starter.

  

Method

We levain was a 5 hour single all in one shot kind of build, which had the same variety of home milled whole grains in it.  We like using whole grains in levains and at220 gthis one was 23% of the total dough weight - right in the 20-30% range we like. 

  

While levain was building itself up to full strength we autolysed all the other ingredients including the salt for nearly 5 hours.  When the levain was finished we mixed it by hand with the autolysed portion of the mix.  Once mixed we did a full 12 minutes of French slap and folds before allowing the dough to rest in a plastic covered  and oiled bowl for 15 minutes.

 

After the brief rest, 4 sets of S&F’s were done one 15 minute intervals with the resting done back in the covered bowl.  Once the S&F’s were completed the dough was allowed to develop and ferment for 1 hour before being pre-shaped into a loaf and allowed to rest for 10 minutes before being final shaped and place into a loaf tin.

 

As soon as the tin was filled with dough,  it was placed into a plastic bag and refrigerated for a 15 hour retard at 38 F.  The dough was taken out of the fridge and allowed to come to room temperature for 1 hour.

 

With 15 minutes left for the warm up, (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups were prepared with dish cloth, Pyrex cup 1/2 full of water and micro-waved to boiling and the Mini Oven heated to 500 F.

One of Sylvia’s steaming cups were placed in the back of the oven, the bread tin slid in and the other steaming cup placed in front.  It is a perfect fit that ensures maximum steam if you throw in ¼ C of water on the bottom of the mini oven when you close the door like we did.

 

We steamed the bread for 2 minutes and then turned down the mini oven to 450 Fand steamed for another 8 minutes – 10 minutes of steam total.  When the steam was removed the MO was turned down to 400 F - convection this time.  Every 5 minutes the tin was turned 180 degrees.  After 5minutes the bread was removed from the tin and baked directly on the oven rack.  In 10 more minutes the bread tested 205 F and in Fahrenheit degrees too.  Total bake time was 25 minutes.

 

Since we wanted a softer crust the bread was removed to a cooling rack instead of being allowed to crisp in the off oven with the door ajar.  It was surprising how nice this bread really is - no kidding.  The taste is nice and wheaty and the sour is mild.  The crust baked up blistered and softly chewy like we had hoped for.  The crumb is glossy, soft, and very moist.  A real challenger to Oroweat Whole Wheat that tastes and looks better too.   

 

Nothing like laying down in the cool grass when it is 104 F outside - if you are a tired baking apprentice.

Formula

Starter

Build 1

%

Desem Starter

20

5.00%

Kamut

20

5.00%

WW

40

10.00%

Spelt

40

10.00%

Water

100

25.00%

Total Starter

220

55.00%

 

 

 

Total Starter

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

Levain % of Total

23.40%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

AP

150

37.50%

Bread Flour

150

37.50%

Whole Spelt

12

3.00%

Whole Kamut

6

1.50%

Whole Wheat

80

20.00%

Dough Flour

400

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.00%

Water

270

67.50%

Dough Hydration

67.50%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

510

 

Water

380

 

T. Dough Hydration

74.51%

 

Whole Grain %

45.10%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.83%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

940

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Honey

12

3.00%

VW Gluten

10

2.50%

Wheat Germ

10

2.50%

Ground Flax Seed

10

2.50%

Total

42

10.50%

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We have made banana bread a couple of times the last 2 weeks.  One we made cupcakes with cream cheese icing and this time as a bare loaf.  Ours isn't the normal BNB.  We add chocolate chips and chopped dark bar chocolate, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, bourbon re-hydrated dried, sultanas, raisins, cranberries, prunes, and apricots.  The nuts include, walnuts, almonds and cashews with a splash of walnut oil.  iced or no - these are some seriously good  cupcakes or plain slices of sweet BNB.

 

Our recipe today was too big for a loaf pan so we made 6 cupcakes too.

Brownman’s Banana Bread or Cupcakes

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Dry Mix:

1 ½ C plus 2 T flour

¼ tsp salt

1/8 tsp each ginger, cloves, allspice

1 tsp each cinnamon and nutmeg

1 tsp baking soda

¼ tsp baking powder

1 C chopped walnuts, almonds, pumpkin and sunflower seeds

1 C chopped chocolate chips

Bourbon Fruit – add bourbon to below dried fruits in a Pyrex 1 cup measuring cup covered with plastic wrap.  Microwave on high for 30 seconds and set aside 15 minutes to plump up fruits.

 2 T bourbon

¼ C raisins and sultanas

¼ C dried cranberries

¼ C dried apricots cut into raisin size pieces

1/4 C prunes - chopped

 Wet Mix:

 3 mashed up ripe bananas

1/8 cup sour cream

1 tsp vanilla

2 eggs

½ C vegetable oil

½ C each brown and white sugar

1 T walnut oil

 Add ½ C sugar, ½ C brown sugar and Bourbon fruits to wet mix and stir until sugar is dissolved.  Mix the wet into the dry and stir 50 times with spatula until the flour is incorporated.

Bake cupcakes for about 12-16 minutes until wooden toothpick comes out clean.  Loaves will take 45 minutes or more for wooden skewer to come out clean. 

After 20 minutes remove from pans and let cool completely on wire racks.  Ice both with cream cheese vanilla icing and put sprinkles on each to decorate per the holiday or special occasion.  Makes about 21 cupcakes or 1 large bread loaf pan.

Cream Cheese Frosting for Cupcakes or 9x13 Cake

Ingredients

1/2 C butter, softened

1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened

1 (16-oz.) package powdered sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

Preparation

Beat butter and cream cheese at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add powdered sugar, beating at low speed until blended; stir in vanilla.

Cut recipe in half for 20 Cupcakes or 9x13 sheet cake .

 

 

 

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dabrownman

We ran out of English muffins and once again used a variation fop the one at KAF.  We use YW in conjunction with a SD Desem starter to make EM;s that are very similar to Wofferman’s but 16% whole wheat.  They are light, fluffy, airy and just plain delicious.  We make them all the time and never want to run out of them in the freezer

 

After 8 hours the dough had more than doubled and stuck to the plastic cover to reveal the airy structure beneath. 

The method is simple enough.  Build the SD and YW levains over 6 hours in one stage each.  After the levains have doubled, mix everything except the salt, sugar and baking soda together and let sit out overnight or for 8 hours on the counter.  Make sure the bowl is covered in plastic and well oiled and at least 3 times the size of the dough ball.

 

See the 2 free form ones made after cutting out 7 on the first pass?

After the overnight proofing add the remaining salt, sugar and BP and knead on a floured work surface for 4-5 minutes.  Let rest for 10 minutes and then press out into a circle that is ¾ “ thick.  No need for a rolling pin.  Use a cutter to make 3”-4” rounds – I used a plastic drinking cup.  Move to a corn meal or semolina sprinkled parchment paper covered cookie sheet and cover with plastic to final proof 45 minutes on the counter.

 

We managed 9 large ones but you could get a dozen smaller ones.  Dry fry in a seasoned cast iron skillet on medium low heat about 4-5 minutes per side until golden brown.  Move to a cooling rack.  Eat while warm with butter and jam.  Yummy!

   

SD YW English Muffins - 16% Whole Wheat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Total

%

SD Starter

10

10

2.46%

Yeast Water

31

31

9.39%

WW

31

31

9.39%

AP

41

41

12.42%

Water

41

41

12.42%

Total Starter

154

154

46.67%

 

 

 

 

Sd YW Starter Totals

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Whole Wheat

30

9.09%

 

AP

300

90.91%

 

Dough Flour

330

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

2.12%

 

Milk

238

72.12%

 

Dough Hydration

72.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

407

 

 

Milk & Water

315

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.40%

 

 

Whole Grain %

16.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

729

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Ingredients

 

 

 

1 T Sugar

 

 

 

1 tsp Baking Soda

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

 

Here we go with the second attempt to make baggies inspired by Ian but using Phil’s ingredients and method.  We also didn’t want to slash the dough like Pierre Nury doesn’t with his Rustic style.  But we did slash it, quite poorly, in the end.  If you don’t practice you won’t get any better right?

  

This bread rose nicely in the fridge and in the oven.  It baked up nice and brown and crunchy and went softer as the bread cooled on the rack.   The crumb was nice and open, and glossy.  I don’t think we will ever get Phil’s holes but we keep trying.  Not as many blisters this time since we were not baking in the mini oven where blisters are cheap and easy.

  

We like the taste of this bread very much, even though it is more ‘Guedo” than Brownmen usually like  better.   But, it tastes so good I just keep putting butter on it and wolfing it down.  A little variety isn’t all bad now and again.    

 

Method

We more closely followed Phil’s recipe and method using Desem SD starter only built over 6 hours – no yeast water this time.  We used white whole wheat flour and AP since we can’t get Lauche Wallaby unless we swim very far and we are totally out of spelt.  Still we kept the sifted whole wheat to 15% of the flour and we reduced the levain to 10% instead of using 20% like last time.  The hydration was kept at 75%.  We autolysed the flours and water, less 30 g, for nearly 6 hours.

 

We love doing slap and folds and enjoyed kneading the dough this way for 3 minutes.  We held back 30 g of water and diluted the salt in it before adding it into the dough before the 2nd set of French slap and folds also lasting 3 minutes.  The extra water and salt were worked into the dough by squeezing the dough through the fingers until the dough came back together.  We rested the dough for 4 hours on the counter.

The dough was still quite sticky but we resisted adding any flour.  We pre-shaped and final shaped 10 minutes later into a 16” long ‘Fat Bag’ shape as best we could manage. The shaped dough was put into a rice floured and cloth lined  ‘fat baguette’ basket to proof for another 1 1.2 hours before being retarded in the fridge in a plastic trash bag.

 

12 hours later we took it out of the fridge and noticed that it had risen nicely while resting at 38F.  The hour that the dough took to come to room temperature we used to fire up Old Betsy and get her up to 500 F with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming pans half full of water with kitchen towels rolled up in them.   We also put our 12” cast iron skillet in the bottom as well to throw some water in when we loaded the ‘Fat Bag’ which sounds pretty kinky.

 

We streamed bread for 10 minutes at 482 F (250C) and removed the steaming apparatus and baked at 392 F convection this time until the bread registered 205 F inside.  We rotated the loaves 90 degrees every 5 minutes to ensure even browning.  In 15 minutes (25 minutes total) the bread was done and we turned off the oven and left the door ajar with the bread on the stone for an additional 10 minutes to crisp the crust.

 

15% WWW Fat Bag with DesemSD Starter ala Ian and Phil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

 

SD Starter

8

0

0

8

1.80%

 

AP

41

0

0

41

10.25%

 

Water

35

0

0

35

8.75%

 

Total Starter

84

0

0

84

21.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

86.67%

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

10.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

 

AP

335

83.75%

 

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

65

16.25%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

400

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.00%

 

 

 

 

Water

295

73.75%

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

73.75%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

445

 

 

 

 

 

Water

334

 

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

15.51%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

787

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This bread originally started out to be baguettes along the line of the one Ian (isand66) baked this last week only with the addition of SD to his YW only levain.

  

 I was going to do a Pierre Nury take, no slash, Rustic Light Rye approach to it where you just cut a 10” square proofed dough into (2) 5”x10” rectangles,  stretch the dough to 12”and just let it plop on the parchment - no slashing required and then right into the oven it goes.  But then, my wife needs sandwich bread too?

  

The SD /YW combo levain was under way when Pip’s (Phil) latest fabulous bread hid TFL.   I decided to change the dough flours around to match his 15 % of fresh milled whole grains even though we used a multigrain approach, since they were already ground earlier in the day, which was different than Phil’s spelt. Both Ian and Phil used 75% hydration so we went with that.   

  

We cut Phil’s recipe to 1,200 g from 3,600.   We also decided to use Phil’s method of 6 hour levain build, long autolyse (5-6 hours) holding back some water, 3 minutes French fold (I used French Slap and Folds thinking they might be the same thing and we like doing them), add in the salt and the rest of water and squeezing the dough through the fingers until it come back together, another 3 minutes of French slap and folds, and a 4 hour bulk rise with no touching – no stretch and folds.

  

We pre-shaped and shaped going into a basket for 2 hours of proof on the counter, then into the fridge for a 12 hour retard.  It came out of the fridge in the morning nicely risen for another hour of warm up before going into the steaming mini oven oven at 500 F, steaming for 12 minutes with oven turned down to 450 F after 2 minutes.

 

 

Since my levain was already 21% of the final dough weight instead of the 10% that Phil used, I decided to cut the 4 hour bulk ferment in half to 2 hours undisturbed and the final proof from 2 hours to 1 hour before going into the fridge.  The rest of Phil’s method was not modified other than we went with a boule instead of a batard and used Ian’s signature T-Rex scoring since we skipped his baggies but we will do them soon.

 

Somehow Pierre Nury’s cut and stretch Rustic Method was not incorporated and he deserves better than that so we will use it next time.  It is odd how things can change based on a really good bread posted on TFL – like Phil’s.  Mine won’t come out as nice as Phil’s but, just the thought that it might, is worth the doing. 

  

The scoring went well as my apprentice modified, (bent), our single side razor blade into a gentle curve like a lame blade.  The boule puffed itself up very well during the 12 minute steaming using a combination of (1) of Sylvia’s steaming cups and  our latest bake’ bottom broiler pan with ½ C of water,  covered with the vented top of the broiler pan where the parchment and bread bakes.

 

After the steam came out, we baked the bread at 400 F, convection this time, for an additional 16 minutes (28 minutes overall) turning the boule 90 degrees every 4 minutes.  When the center hit 205 F we turned off the oven, left the door ajar and allowed the boule to cool in the oven for an additional 12 minutes.  The temperature rose to 209 F while resting in the off mini oven.

 

The bread sprang so much it was little close to the top elements and got a little dark on the top but, no worries, it wasn’t burnt and should add a little extra yumminess to the crust.  The mini (and steam) provided its signature blisters to the crust.  It came out crunchy crisp and shattered and cracked where it got the hottest as it cooled.  The crust softened as it cooled to become chewy.

The bottom wasn’t as brown as usual.  This has to be due to the water in the lower half of the broiler pan that was less than an1” from the bread.  Even though the spring was great with blisters we will go back to either Sylvia’s steam alone or covering the bread with a stainless steel bowl which will also keep the top from browning too much and still give us dark brown bottom crust and blisters.

This is also the largest boule we can possibly put in the mini oven.  It stuck to steaming cup and the side of the broiler pan as it was.  We think a loaf that was 200 g less in size would be more prudent.

The crumb came out fairly open but nearly as much as Phil’s did.   This because he is such a fine baker and my apprentice is not.   Plus, we used YW and cut the counter development time by about 2 hours or so to take into account we used twice as much levain.

But the crumb was glossy, moist, airy and light like our recent YW.SD bakes have been.   We will follow Phil’s methods more closely next time.   The taste is very good  Just what my wife will like for her lunch sandwich bread.   

15% Multi-grain Bread With YW and SD Combo Levain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

0

10

0

10

1.49%

Yeast Water

50

0

0

50

9.29%

WW

10

0

0

10

1.86%

Durum Atta

0

10

0

10

1.86%

AP

40

45

25

110

20.45%

Water

0

55

10

65

12.08%

Total Starter

100

120

35

255

47.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

88.89%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Wheat Germ

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Buckwheat

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Bulgar

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Whole Barley

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

201

37.36%

 

 

 

AP

231

42.94%

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Quinoa

10

1.86%

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

538

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

2.04%

 

 

 

Water

385

71.56%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

71.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

673

 

 

 

 

Water

505

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.04%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

15.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.04%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,199

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

 

After the last 100% Kamut and 100% spelt bakes, both at 100% hydration, we decided to get bake to more of our normal kind of bread we like so much.

  

This one is 57% whole grains made up of Kamut, spelt, rye and WW.  The seeds at 20% and include, hemp, chia, pumpkin and sunflower seeds.

  

We had made some Greek yogurt earlier in the week and wanted to use some of the whey in this bread to help bring out the sour but not so much the whey took over.  The whey made up 20% of the dough liquid but only 14% of the total liquid in this bread.

  

The SD levain was built over (2) 3 hr and (1) 1 hour build and then refrigerated for 48 hours. The flours were autolysed with everything except the levain and seeds for 3 hours.  The levain was allowed to come to room temperature over and hour and then hand kneaded for 5 minutes into the dough now only minus the seeds.

  

After resting in an oiled and plastic covered bowl for 20 minutes, 4 sets of S&F’s were performed with a 15 minute rest between them back in the covered bowl.  The seeds were incorporated in stretch and fold #3 and fully distributed in fold #4.

 

There was only a15 minute ferment after the last S&F and the dough was pre-shaped shaped into a boule and final shape 10 minutes later.  The boule was upended into a rice floured basket seam side up.  The basket was placed in a trash can liner end closed and placed into the fridge for a 12 hour retard.

 

The mini oven was cranked up475 Fto pre-heat with the bottom of the broiler pan inside.  The boule was un-molded onto parchment that was on the vented top of the broiler pan.  For once it was artfully slashed, ½ C of water was thrown into the bottom of the broiler pan, the bread was covered with stainless steel mixing bowl and the broiler top, parchment, boule and bowl were placed into the bottom of the broiler pan to steam.

After 5 minutes, the temperature was turned down to450 F.  The bread was allowed to steam under the stainless bowl for an additional 15 more minutes - 20 minutes total.  The covering bowl was then removed and the bread was baked another 16 minutes at425 F, convection this time.  The bread was rotated 90 degrees every 4 minutes.  The bread was deemed done when it registered205 F  internal temperature.

 

The bread was allowed to crisp in the turned off mini oven, door ajar, for 10 more minutes before being moved to cooling rack.

  

Formula

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Kamut, WW, Rye SD Starter

20

0

0

20

4.20%

Dark Rye

10

0

0

10

2.10%

WW

10

0

0

10

2.10%

Kamut

20

40

30

90

18.91%

Water

40

40

15

95

19.96%

Total

80

40

15

225

28.36%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

120

25.21%

 

 

 

Water

105

22.06%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

87.50%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

 

24.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Rye

25

5.25%

 

 

 

WW

50

10.50%

 

 

 

Spelt

25

5.25%

 

 

 

Kamut

52

10.92%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

102

21.43%

 

 

 

AP

102

21.43%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

356

74.79%

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.89%

 

 

 

Water 200, Whey 49

249

52.31%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

69.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Pumpkin

25

5.25%

 

 

 

Sunflower

25

5.25%

 

 

 

Hemp

25

5.25%

 

 

 

Chia 10 & Flax 10   Seeds

20

4.20%

 

 

 

Total

95

19.96%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

476

 

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

354

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

74.37%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.37%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

934

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

57.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We just love the authentic, taste texture and chew of Stan Ginsberg’s Favorite Bagels that are authentic and just plain delicious any way you want to eat them.  We keep messing with the grains and starters to get what we want in our favorite bagels.

 

 All the whole grains are in the starter, a new thing we are trying out lately.  The grains were home milled rye, WW and Kamut and make up 17% of the total flours.  We also included a little less than 10% of roasted potato left over from Beer Can Chicken. 

 

 As usual with out take on bagels, there is some barley malt, red and white malts were included to improve the color and taste of the bagels along with adding the enzymes that break down carbohydrates and starch into sugars that the yeast and bacteria can use to do their thing gas and sour wise.

 We have been using a combo YW and SD starter to build the levains for recent bagels and we did so again this time.  We get a nice moist open crumb with a slight SD tang using a combo starter.

From left to right front - Chia seeds, Sesame, white sesame and Multi - all the prvious plus, black sesame, kosher salt, basil and  nigella seeds.

 We used exactly the same method as last time and baked the bagels off in the mini oven using Sylvia’s steam developed for it.  Our change from Stan’s method is to proof the bagels after forming for 1 hour before refrigerating and we retard them for 24 hours before boiling them.

 These are now our favorite go to bagel and have now met our taste, texture, chew and color criteria.  They are just delicious.  Now there is not reason to go to NY for bagels anymore and it sure is cheaper too.

 Method

We built the YW and SD levain together over (2) 3 hour and (1) 2 hour build and then refrigerated them for 48 hours. Home ground whole wheat berries were used for the starter and accounted for all the whole grains in the final dough.

 

The flours, salt, mashed potatoes and malts were autolysed for 3 hours and hand mixed into the levain. The stiff dough was kneaded for 10 minutes by hand and then allowed to rest, ferment and develop for a whopping 15 minutes covered with plastic wrap on the counter.

The dough was them divided into (10) 122g pieces, folded into balls and then into 12” tapered, from middle to end, ropes. The ropes were rested for 10 minutes and then formed into bagels by the ‘over the knuckles’ method where the ends were rolled on the counter to seal them together.

The bagels were placed onto a parchment covered and corn meal sprinkled cookie sheet, covered in plastic wrap and refrigerated for 24 hours.

Latest $2 Goodwill purchase yesterday at half price.  It's a 901 - just perfect for an oval shape bread or nice baked chicken. 

After removing the bagels from the fridge, they were immediately simmered for 30 seconds a side in 1 gallon of water with 1 T of barley malt syrup and 1 tsp of baking soda. The wet bagel bottoms were placed on a kitchen towel for 5 seconds after coming out of the water, dunked in the topping of choice and then placed on parchment paper sprinkled with semolina which was on the top cover of the mini ovens broiler.

The mini oven was preheated to 45o F with the rack on the bottom. A 1 cup Pyrex measuring cup with a rolled up dish rag, half full of water, was micro waved until the water boiled. Sylvia’s steaming method was then placed in the middle of the parchment paper between (4) bagels at the corners.

The bagels were steamed for 8 minutes with the heat being turned down to 450 F. At the 8 minute mark the steam was removed, the bagels turned upside down and the rack rotated 180 degrees. The Mini Oven was also turned down to 425 F, convection this time,  at the 8 minute mark too.  After an additional 4 minutes, the bagels were turned 18o degrees on the parchment – still upside down..

At 16 minutes total baking time the bagels were deemed done. They were nicely browned top and bottom and sounded like a drum when tapped on the bottom. They were moved to wire cooling racks until cooled.

Formula

22% Whole Multi-grain SD YW Bagels     
      
Starter BuildBuild 1Build 2 Build 3Total%
Rye & WW Starter2000202.90%
Yeast Water155 202.90%
Dark Rye20250456.52%
WW20035557.97%
Kamut15  152.17%
Water4020157510.87%
Total100305023026.09%
      
SD / YW Starter %   
Flour12518.12%   
Water10515.22%   
Starter Hydration84.00%    
Levain % of Total 19.18%   
      
Dough Flour %   
Bread Flour28040.58%   
AP28040.58%   
Total Dough Flour56081.16%   
Salt142.03%   
Water30043.48%   
Dough Hydration53.57%    
      
Add - Ins %   
Red Rye Malt30.43%   
White Rye Malt20.29%   
Mashed Potato659.42%   
Barley Malt101.45%   
Total9013.04%   
      
Total Flour w/ Starter690    
Total Water w/ Starter405    
Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter58.70%    
Hydration w/ Adds64.39%    
Total Weight1,199120 grams each for (10)
% Whole Grain16.67%    

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Happy Rosh Hashanah to all  -  A New Year Knotted Roll for dinner made here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29577/50-rye-sd-knotted-rolls-wheat-germ-caraway-and-sunflower-seeds

but eaten tonight.  It is a 50% Rye SD Knotted Rolls With Wheat Germ, Barley Scald, Caraway and Sunflower Seeds and was just as good as the day they were made.    They are all gone now but we will make some more sometime in the New Year.  The best to you and yours.

Forgot the New Year's sunset.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We have wanted to take up Michael Wilson’s ‘Spelt Challenge’ of 100% white spelt at 100% hydration ever since we saw his fine post.  In our case we milled the whole grain and sifted it to 78% extraction.

 

We like whole grain breads and hate to throw the sifted out portion away. Michael suggested that we could put it back in on the last set of slap and folds to try to minimize gluten strand harm.  So that is what we did and we also added 40g (dry weight) of spelt sprouted berries while we were at it since we love sprouts as much as whole grains.

 

Even though this isn’t an equal challenge since our whole grains would be more thirsty and thus the dough easier to work with, it was still a sloppy mess but oddly not that difficult to work with like rye would have been.

 

The bad part of the process is that our 15 year old Krupp’s coffee grinder that we have used to grind grain gave up the ghost.  We usually watch how hot it gets and how much grain we put in it at one time but my apprentice ignored both on the last grind for this bread.    Right as we were about to say done – it was.

 

The bread came out as flat boule as the last 100% hydration bakes seem to end up.  These breads really should be baked as a ciabatta or in a loaf tin rather than deflating them when transferring from the basket to the hot DO.  But we thought we would give it one more try to get it to spring in the oven.

 

The bread baked up a nice shade of brown but not the dark color we usually prefer - higher oven temps and less time covered might give us a better crust.  It did blister a little though.  The crumb was much more open than we thought it would be as was the pervious kamut flat boule and it was soft and very moist.   This bread is even more delicious than the kamut was and is its best quality.  It is a fine bread for sandwiches or even  dirtlocks.   We like this bread a lot even though it too took the flat boule route as the kamut did before it. 

 

Method

If you make this bread you want to start the sprouts 2 days before you need them because unlike rye which sprouts in 24 hours these take 48.   Just soak them in water for 3 hours, drain them and spread them our between damp paper towels and cover with plastic wrap so they don’t dry out.  Finally cover them in a kitchen towel so no light gets to them.  Re-dampen the top paper towels at the 24 hour mark and 24 hours later you will have perfect spelt sprouts.

 

The spelt levain was developed over two, (3) hour builds from our kamut starter and then refrigerated for 24 hours.  It was then removed from the fridge and allowed to further develop on the counter for 2 hours.

The 78% extraction flour and the extraction were autolysed separately for 2 hours. The salt, VWG and malts were autolysed with the 78% extraction.  We wanted the VWG to make sure we had some gluten in the final mix and was very glad it was there.

The water was a combination of Shiitake mushroom re-hydration water, spelt soaker water and RO water.  Since the water equals the flour weights it was split up between the two autolyses based on weight of the flour and the bran.

The dough flour autolyse and the levain were combined in the KA mixing bowl and mixed on KA 2 with the paddle for 4 minutes.  The dough hook was then used and the dough was kneaded for 10 more minutes.  The dough was then placed in an oiled, plastic covered bowl for 10 minutes.

2 sets of stretch and folds were done 10 minutes apart with each set being 25 stretches.  Then 3 sets of French slap and folds were done for 10 minutes duration each and 10 minutes apart with the dough being rested in the plastic covered bowl between sets. At the beginning of the last set of slap and folds, the bran autolyse was incorporate.  Half way through the last set, the sprouts were incorporated.  The final 5 minutes of slap and folds fully incorporated the bran and sprouts.

 

We were really surprised that the slap and folds were so easy.  A light oiling of the granite countertop was all that was needed to keep it from sticking.  After 20 minutes of slap and folds the dough was very extensible and the dough would hold a ball shape for the shortest period of time but you could tell the gluten was starting to come together.

a Lunch grilled chicken sandwich and fixin's with tofu, re-fried beans, red pepper, carrots, celery sticks, salad with tomato, half a peach, red grapes with corn tortilla chips, Brownman's Red Salsa and Pico de Gillo.  Red breakfast with apple butter and caramelized minneola marmalade, strawberry, watermelon and red grapes.

 

Once the sprouts and bran were worked in, the dough behaved better but still would not hold a ball shape for more than a few seconds.  The slap and folds really weren’t difficult or the exhausting chore we thought they would be in the end.  It was really kind of fun to do them once you got in the rhythm. 

Last night's sunset was something to behold. 

A cloth lined basket was heavily floured with rice flour and used to house the nearly un-shapeable dough as a semi, sort of ball.  It was immediately housed in a trash can liner and placed into the fridge for a 12 hour retard and proof.

We think that this dough should be proofed in a loaf pan but since we planned on baking it in a hot DO we needed a transfer agent and the cloth lined basket was the needed transfer vehicle.  We hoped that the cold would help give the dough some additional structure to make the transfer a success.  We won’t try to slash this dough since it is so wet and figure it will spread in the DO.

The Big Oven was fired up to 500 F with the DO inside.  The dough transfer went as well as expected but it did stick to the cloth liner somewhat – no worries – and it did spread faster than peanut butter sitting in a DO on a hot fire in the hot AZ sun.

We turned the oven down to 450 F after 10 minutes and baked it for 22 minutes with the lid on.  We then turned the oven down to 415 F (convection this time) and baked it for 10 more minutes, turning it 180 degrees after 5, with the lid off before taking the bread out of the DO and testing for temperature. 

The middle was 209 F so we turned off the oven and left the bread on the stone to crisp the skin for 10 minutes with the door ajar.  The bread was then moved to the cooling rack and then onto.  Total baking time was 32 minutes not including the rest on the stone at the end.   The formula brings up the rear as usual.

100 % Hydration, 100% Whole Spelt Sourdough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Spelt  Starter

20

0

20

3.46%

Whole Spelt

40

40

80

13.84%

Water

40

40

80

13.84%

Total

100

80

180

31.14%

 

 

 

 

 

Spelt Starter

 

%

 

 

Whole Spelt

90

15.57%

 

 

Water

90

15.57%

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

 

14.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Whole Spelt

488

84.43%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

488

84.43%

 

 

Salt

9

1.56%

 

 

Water 330, Mush R 120, Soak 62

512

88.58%

 

 

Dough Hydration

104.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.35%

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.35%

 

 

VW Gluten

20

3.46%

 

 

Spelt Sprouts

40

6.92%

 

 

Total

64

11.07%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

578

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

602

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

104.15%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

100.00%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,253

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

There is no question my apprentice likes to retard her pizza dough overnight but, sometimes you just don’t have that much time when the pizza urge hits you.  No worries!  We managed a very nice pizza in 8 hours starting at 10 AM yesterday.

 

We started the combo YW and Desem WW levain build and cut the 3 stage build from 3 to 2.  Two hours for the first stage and 3 hours for the second.  It had doubled in 5 hours.  For the last 3 hours of the levain build we autolysed the flour, dried rosemary, olive oil, Moho de Ajo, (2) malts, sun dried tomato oil, salt and the dough water.

 

We always try to have around 30% whole grains in our formulas if possible and this time it was a mix of whole wheat and soft white wheat that we ground at home.  So Desem WW starter was in order and we wanted the boost that YW gives to speed things along some due to the shot amount of time we had to get this dough ready.

 

5 hours in; 3 PM, we mixed the autolyse and the levains in the KA for 6 min on KA 2 and 2 minutes on KA 3.  Then we let it rest for 10 minutes.  We then did 3 sets of S & F’s, 10 minutes apart on a lightly oiled counter, starting with 20 stretches and ¼ turns and reducing the stretches by 5 each set – a total of 45 stretches.

The dough was ready to go after 2 hours and 15 minutes of resting and fermenting in a plastic covered oiled bowl.  At 5:15 PM we fired Old Betsy; Big GE oven too 500 F no steam.  These 2 pizzas were fully peel size and there was no way these were going to fit in the mini oven without some serious magic or ‘Honey I shrunk the pizza’ going on.

We also had the baking stone in there too since we never take it out of the oven except to move it to the grill for pizza there - like last time. Thankfully, after yesterday’s torrential rain it never got over 92 F so a little more heat in the house was not a big deal if you are used to 115 F for the last who knows how long.

After dividing the dough in half, we hand stretched it out to peel size, brushed a layer of some more Mojo de Ajo on, docked it  and put it in the oven to par bake for 3 minutes.  Then we removed it and then piled on the toppings of our choice, kalamata olives, hatch green chilies, red peppers, caramelized onions, re-hydrated dried shitake mushrooms, home made Italian sausage, pepperoni; parmesan, Colby and mozzarella cheeses  and some fresh basil for a garnish after it came out of the oven.

Then back into the oven for another 7 minutes or so to get nice and brown  - since, as Anne Burrell says “brown food tastes good’ and Brownmen agree with her.

 

Friday night grilled shrimp kabobs with Mexican Green Dirty Rice.  We are thinking beer can chicken for tonight.

The crust came out picture perfect thin and crisp, nicely browned on the bottom and tasted good.  After cutting, the slices were flat out rigid when held up, even with all the toppings and didn’t go limp, like NY Pizza, until the left over slices were being wrapped for freezing.

Sorry the photos are so bad this time but at night with indoor lighting it is the best my apprentice could manage.  They are still better then the ones my phone takes!  Formula follows at the end.

Soft White Wheat, WWSD YW Combo Pizza Dough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Desem  Starter

10

0

10

2.75%

Yeast Water

10

0

10

2.75%

Soft White

0

25

25

6.89%

WW

25

0

25

6.89%

AP

0

50

50

13.77%

Water

20

50

70

19.28%

Total

65

125

190

52.34%

 

 

 

 

 

Combo YW SD Starter

 

%

 

 

Flour

105

28.93%

 

 

Water

85

23.42%

 

 

Starter Hydration

80.95%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

 

29.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Soft White Wheat

58

15.98%

 

 

WW

0

0.00%

 

 

Bread Flour

100

27.55%

 

 

AP

100

27.55%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

258

71.07%

 

 

Salt

7

1.93%

 

 

Water

170

46.83%

 

 

Dough Hydration

65.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Dried Rosemary

1

0.28%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.55%

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.55%

 

 

EVOO 10, SD Tom. 10, MdA 5

25

6.89%

 

 

Total

30

8.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

363

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

255

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

70.25%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

69.29%

 

 

 

Total Weight

655

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

30.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

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