The Fresh Loaf

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dabrownman

We decide to use some left overs for this bake from the last bake of hot dog buns.  The left overs were the pickled onion, red pepper, tomato and poblano toppings that we added some kalamata olives too and then caramelized the whole mix to get rid of the moisture, add a roasted flavor and send this bred further down an Italian path.

 

Oddly, the sifted bran, that was fed to the starter to make the levain, started out much darker than the remainder of the sifted flour used to make the autolyse.  But when they finally came together, the levain on the left was much lighter in color than the autolyse.  Very strange!

To this 100% whole multi grain bake we added some barley to the usual whole grain mix of spelt, rye, wheat and farro.  Since we ground all the grains for this bread in the tiny Krup’s Coffee mill, we were able to sift out 22% from the rest of this fine flour and used it to feed the levain for this bake.

 

That way the bran and other bits were in the wet the longest at 36 hours to get them soft and less likely to cut any gluten strands.  Plus, they instantly make the bread 100% whole grain again and we made sure to get the hydration to over 100% this time too after our last 90% hydration bake.

 

We added a large boiled whole barley component, Toadies, ground flax and sesame seeds, red and white malts were added along with just enough VWG to make sure we got some rise out this gluten deficient grain combination.  To top it off we added some shredded parmesan making sure that the Italian base was confirmed.

 

We didn’t know if our fridge maintained, mixed grain, SD starter would like being fed the 22% sifted out portion of the grain so we increased the seed by 5 g to 15g for this bake.   The levain ended up being 15% of the total weight of the dough and it performed as usual.   We refrigerated it for 24 hours after the levain had risen about 25% after the 3rd feeding to increase the sour.

 

You can see the poke test and the cracking on the bottom of the loaf.  Time for the oven.

When we removed the levain from the fridge to finish it’s doubling after the cold, we started the 3 hour autolyse with everything except the levain, salt, seeds, caramelized pickle mix and boiled barley.

 

Once the levain hit the autolyse we mixed it briefly using a spoon for 30 seconds and immediately knew this dough was going to be a problem and way, way over hydrated.  The last dough was great at 90 % and 100% hydration would have been fine but this dough was different

 

It had less wheat flours with the addition of rye and barley.   These changes made the dough very sloppy.  We let the mix sit for 20 minutes after sprinkling the salt on top.  We then did our usual 10 minutes of slap and folds where the dough barely came together.

 

Our rule is, if 10 minutes of slap and folds don’t do the trick then we add more flour.  To keep it in the Italian range our flour of choice was some whole Desert Durum.    We used some to get the sticky dough off our fingers after 10 minutes.  We let the dough rest for 10 minutes and then did 5 more minutes of slap and folds using Desert Durum to get the dough off our fingers once again and allowed the dough to rest for 10 minutes again.   

 

We then did 3 stretch and folds 20 minutes apart to incorporate the boiled berries and seeds on the first one, the caramelized veggies and Parmesan on the 2nd one. It’s like bruschetta on the inside!  By the end of the 3rd one then add ins were thoroughly incorporated.  We then let it ferment for 20 minutes before retarding it for 16 hours in the fridge.

 

Breakfast and lunch on bake day

It rose well in the fridge if you consider 30% volume increase well and we let it rest for 30 minutes on the counter before shaping it into something you might find in Altamura if they do Fendu there.  The bread only had 4 g or durum in it but was still plenty Italian enough.

 

It was so slack it probably should have gone into a pan but we shaped it as a Snails with Tails chacon for the final proof with the fendu fold split in the middle in bottom of the basket between the snails.  The last bake was very weak when it came to snail splitting and we wanted to give it another go.

 

We let proof on the 84 F counter for 2 ½ hours and then we fired up the mini oven to 500F and got (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cup’s half full of water with dish rags inside going in the microwave.

 

We upended the basket using the vented top of the mini’s broiler pan for a peel that was covered in parchment.  The cups went on and that assembly went into the 500 F mini oven for 15 minutes of steam.  We turned the oven down to 475 F after 3 minutes.  We removed Sylvia’s steam at the 15 minute mark and continued to bake at 425 F, convection this time, for another 15 minutes until then middle read 205 F.  We rotated the bread every 5 minutes under convection to make sure it browned evenly.

 

It browned nicely and the crest was very crispy – almost crunchy.  Nothing seems to put a thick, crust on bread without burning like the mini oven with mega steam in place.  Didn’t notice any blisters though.  This one cracked at the Fendu Fold more than at the Snails but crack it did.  It smells powerful..   The crumb came out farly open for such a packed whoe grain bread.  It was moist and nvery soft.  It does taste like bruschetta on the inside instead of on the outside outside but the surprising thing is the spicy chipotle barley grains. What an unexpected pleasure.  Thus bread is healthy, spicy and great to munch on without toasting, butter or anything else required.  Just delicious.

The bread went well with a fine fritatta of homemade sweet Italian sausage, red bells, poblanos peppers, onion, grey Mexicaan squash adn mushrooms with Greek yogurt mixed in with the eggs and brie, Parmesan and smoky gouda for the cheeses.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

4.91%

Whole Farro

2.5

4

5

10.5

3.44%

Whole Rye

2.5

4

4

10.5

3.44%

Whole Barley

5

8

10

23

7.53%

Whole Wheat

2.5

4

5

11.5

3.76%

Whole Spelt

2.5

4

5

10.5

3.44%

Water

15

24

29

66

21.60%

Total

45

48

58

147

48.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Bran and Sifted Bits

74

24.06%

 

 

 

Water

74

24.06%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

14.64%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Barley

76

24.88%

 

 

 

WholeDesert Durum

4

1.31%

 

 

 

Mixed Whole Grains

152

49.75%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

232

75.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

1.96%

 

 

 

Water

268

87.73%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

115.52%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

306

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

341.5

111.78%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

111.78%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds & Boil

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.98%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

25

8.18%

 

 

 

Pickled Olive, Tomato, Onion & Poblano

60

19.64%

 

 

 

Toadies

15

4.91%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.98%

 

 

 

Parmesan Cheese

50

16.37%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

4.91%

 

 

 

Total

171

55.97%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boil

 

%

 

 

 

Barley Berries

180

58.92%

 

 

 

Total Soaker

180

58.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight of barley berries and pickled veg is after cooking.  The barley berries were boiled in spicy Chipotle sauce.  

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Breakfast on bun day

These were very good buns.  We didn’t make a poolish or a YW levain since we didn’t have time on our side.  It was already 11 AM and no time to grind flour or an autolyse it either.  We used 40 g of YW and a pinch of ADY for the leavens.  This was an all AP bake so not very healthy.  But brats, Italian sausage and Boudin aren’t all that healthy either.

 

We just mixed everything together, did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S& Fs on 45 minute intervals and then let the dough rest for 1 hour.  We shaped the buns pulling them taut and let them proof for 3 hours on parchment paper, on the top portion of the mini’s vented broiler pan, on the counter.

 

We fired the mini oven up to 400 F convection and egg washed the buns.  We baked them without steam for 4 minutes and turned the oven down to 375 F convection  and baked the rolls another 4 minutes before spinning the pan 180 degrees and turning the oven down to 350 F convection.

 

The Last of Sylvia's inspired Key Lime Pie

After 8 more minutes the buns were done and we moved them to the cooling rack and brushed then with milk while still oven hot to keep the skins soft. They came out brown and blistered.  So, blisters aren’t from a cold retard or mega steam or a combination of both - since there rolls didn’t have either.  They were soft, moist and open on the inside.

 

We are getting close to a fine enriched bun recipe with this batch.

A magnificent sunset tonight

Formula

Leaven

Build 1

%

Pinch of ADY

0

0.00%

Yeast Water

40

11.94%

Total

40

11.94%

 

 

 

YW % of Total

6.16%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Durum

110

32.84%

AP

225

67.16%

Dough Flour

335

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

5

1.49%

Milk

166

49.55%

Dough Hydration

49.55%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

335

100.00%

Total Water and YW

206

 

T. Dough Hydration

61.49%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

77.18%

 

Total Weight

653

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Butter

24

7.16%

Cream Cheese

20

5.97%

Olive Oil

5

1.49%

Egg

53

15.82%

Sugar

5

1.49%

Total

107

31.94%

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After seeing Phil’s great post this past week using fresh milled flour, sesame seeds, 100% whole grain, 100% hydration sourdough breads of various kinds, we had to give something like it a shot for our weekly Friday bake.  It had to be a sane recipe rather than what Phil would do hydration wise and something Lucy could handle after the beauty parlor.

   

Inspired by Phil, we came up with a near knock off SD using home milled, 100% whole grain, 90% hydration wheat, spelt and farro bread that had a large ground flax and sesame seed add in.    We hate sifting flour but decided to do it getting a 78% extraction.

  

The nasty 22% bit we soaked for 24 hours with the toadies and 30 g of un-sifted flour left over from the levain build at 100% hydration hoping that it would soften the gluten cutting parts to something that was less like a chain saw.

  

The SD levain was built with un-sifted flour over (2) 4 hour builds and (1) 1 hour build with our rye and whole wheat mixed seed before being refrigerated for 24 hours to enhance the sour.  When we took it out of the fridge we allowed the levain to finish doubling on the counter about 3 hours.  The levain ended up being 19% of total and near the 20% Phil used for his bake.

 

We did a 2 hour autolyse for the wonderful handling flour at 100% hydration, no salt or levain but including the home made red and white malts and VWG.  It really sucked up the water.  Once the autolyse and the levain were mixed with 30 seconds of slap and folds, e sprinkled the salt on top and let the dough rest for 20 minutes.

 

Then we did 10 minutes of slap and folds to develop the gluten. We were stunned that the dough never stuck to the marble counter.   It developed beautifully like it was a 72% hydration dough.  We let the dough rest for 15 minutes before gently stretching it out in a rectangle and incorporating the 22% bran mix on the first S&F.

 

On the 2nd set of S&F’s we incorporated the ground flax and sesame seeds.  This mix is quickly becoming our normal add in for bread like Toadies.  They aren’t as flavor enhancing as Toadies but they make a big difference.

 

Breakfast with our take of Aroma bread inspired by Karin and Maria.

 

After the 3rd set of S&F’s the add ins were well incorporated and evenly distributed.  We then did another 30 seconds of slap and folds to get the gluten back in shape and then allowed the dough to rest for 20 minutes.  We could have easily done a 100% hydration dough as this freshly milled  multi-grain flour loved the wet.

 

Surf amd turf - ceviche with smoked ribs, a nice sunset and Sylvia's inspired Key Lime Pie ,ade the 4th special.

We did a quick pre-shape into an oval and let the dough rest for 10 minutes before cutting off 90 g of dough from each end of the oval to make two snails with tails for the chacon design in the bottom of the basket.

 

It wasnlt all food for the 4th.  Lime Majito Jello Shots made as halves and then cut in quarters were a big hit too.

We bought a new basket for this bake which was just the right size and an oval shape.  We rice floured it but, since it is new, the dough will probably stick anyway.   We final shaped the remaining dough into an oval that we shaped and pulled tight before putting it on top for the snails with tails.

 

The basket was placed into a used trash can liner and put in the fridge for a 16 hour cold retard.  The next morning, after 4th of July festivities, we took the dough out the fridge for a 1 hour warm and 1 ½ hour final proof up before putting it into the 500 F mini oven with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups.

 

After 2 minutes off steam we turned the mini oven down to 450 F and continued to steam for another 13 minutes.  We removed the steaming cups and turned the mini down to 425 F, convection this time.  In another 15 minutes, rotating the bread every 5 minutes, it registered 205 F in the middle of the oval and was removed to a cooling rack.

 

It domed a little bit but browned well in the heat.  The snails with tails hardly cracked, not what we had expected.  So, it did look …..a little slow to Lucy who thinks slimy things should be kept far away from bread and cooked separately with a little hot sauce on the side.  Maybe 100% hydration is the right amount.  The crumb came out fairly open for this kind of bread even though it didn't spring much.  It was moist and glossy.....and just plain delicious.   This is a another one of those breads that instantly becomes a classic.   Thanks for the inspiration Phil.  Next time we will do it t 100% too.

Whole wheat top, spelt right and farro left - also small, medium and large grains as well as dark, medium and light color.

 

100% Whole; Spelt, Farro and Wheat Sourdough with Toadies, Flax & Sesame Seeds

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.05%

Whole Farro

6

10

20

36

7.38%

Whole Wheat

6

10

20

36

7.38%

Whole Spelt

6

10

20

36

7.38%

Water

18

30

30

78

15.98%

Total

46

60

90

196

40.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

113

23.16%

 

 

 

Water

83

17.01%

 

 

 

Hydration

73.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

19.10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

85

17.42%

 

 

 

WW

85

0.00%

 

 

 

Spelt

85

17.42%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

255

52.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

2.05%

 

 

 

Water

255

52.25%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

488

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

458

93.85%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds & Soaker

90.16%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,026

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

White Malt

4

0.82%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

50

10.25%

 

 

 

Red Malt

4

0.82%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

12

2.46%

 

 

 

Total

70

14.34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soaker

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Grain Spelt, Farro & WWMix

30

6.15%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

4.10%

 

 

 

Sifted Bran

70

14.34%

 

 

 

Water

120

24.59%

 

 

 

Total Soaker

240

49.18%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After seeing Ian’s post using buttermilk and Greek yogurt I just couldn’t resist taking one of our normal multigrain breads and having a go at it to see what the taste difference would result.  Plus Lucy is always one to try new and interesting things in bread so that she can DaPumperize them later.

 

We had made a huge batch of Greek yogurt earlier in the week and was just going to go with that as an add it but noticed the buttermilk was still unopened even if 3 months out of date.  My reasoning was that since buttermilk is sour already, how much more sour would it be and if baking it to 205 F on the inside what could live through that?  The buttermilk smelled fine but was much thicker than usual. 

 

We used 10 g each of our WW and rye starters to build the levain.  One hour after the 3rd feeding we refrigerated it for 48 hours to bring out the sour.  When we removed the levain from the fridge so it could finish its doubling in volume we started the autolyse of everything else, including the ground flax and sesame seeds, except the sprouts, pumpkin seeds and aromatic bread spices consisting of caraway, fennel, anise and coriander.

  

This week we ran out of everything so had to make a batch of Toadies and some barley and rye sprouts to make red and white malts out of later today after their 5 days of sprouting.  We pinched off 50 g of these wet sprouts for this bread yesterday.  

  

All the whole grains were in the levain and we added some potato flakes, semolina and corn flour to the AP in the dough flours.  The whole grains came in at slightly less than 25 % but when including the Toadies and sprouts this shoots up to over 40%.  Toadies are sifted middlings, wheat bran, oat bran and wheat germ that is toasted until golden brown and then reground.

  

My Greek yogurt is much thicker than the ones in the stores and the buttermilk was very thick so I had to guess at what the hydration was for those items and constructed the formula to have it come out like it felt while doing the slap and folds   It felt like around   75% hydration dough after 12 minutes of slap and folds.

 

We also did 3 sets of S& F’s on 15 minute intervals and incorporated the sprouts and aromatic seeds on the first set and the pumpkin seeds on the 2nd set.  By the 3rd set the add ins were evenly distributed.  We gave the dough a 15 minute rest and then shaped it into an oval and dropped it into an oval basket and immediately refrigerated it for 21 hours.

 

It rose about 70% in the fridge during retard and we let it come to room temperature and final proof fro 2 hours before being scored and baked in the mini oven with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups which were heated to boiling in the microwave. 

 

The mini was heated to 500 F and the bread was un-molded onto parchment on a peel.  The bread was transferred to the mini oven’s broiler pan vented top, the 2 steaming cups added and the whole assembly was loaded into the mini oven.

 

After 3 minutes we turned the temperature down to 475 F since we know the oven reads 25 F higher than actual temperature.   After 12 more minutes of steamed baking we removed the cups and continued to bake lowering the temperature to 425 F - convection this time.  In 20 more minutes of rotating the bread 90 degrees every 5 minutes, the bread was deemed done when it reached 205 F on the inside.

 

It sprang fairly well in the oven and smelled wonderful with those aromatic seeds.  It browned nicely too - but no big blisters that the mini oven is so famous for –just small ones.  he crumb was soft and moist and the crust stayed crunchy shattering when cut.  You can definitely taste the tang of the Greek Yogurt and the buttermilk.  Our bread is usually tangy but this is a whole new and different kind if tang,  You can also taste the aromatic seeds in the background.  It was great toasted with butter and as a lunch sandwich.  I think I like the version using yogurt whey as the liquid better though.  Never really made a bread with Greek yogurt nad buttermilk before,nor have tasted one till now.  Glad I did and thanks Ian for the inspiration.

 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

4.81%

Rye

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Farro

4

4

4

12

2.88%

WW

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Barley

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Spelt

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Water

28

28

28

84

20.19%

Total

68

48

48

164

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

94

22.60%

 

 

 

Water

94

22.60%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

19.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

2.88%

 

 

 

Semolina 50 & Corn Flour 10

60

14.42%

 

 

 

AP

250

60.10%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

322

77.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.68%

 

 

 

Buttermilk

287

68.99%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

62.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

416

100.00%

 

 

 

Buttermilk 287 & Water 94

381

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

74.34%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

24.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain w/ Toadies & Sprouts

40.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.39%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

964

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Greek Yogurt50  12.06%

Aromatic Bread Spices

10

2.40%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

10

2.40%

 

 

 

Pumpkin Seeds

25

6.01%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.40%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.20%

 

 

 

Total

110

26.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

25

6.01%

 

 

 

Barley

25

6.01%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

50

12.02%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprout weight is the wet sprouted weight.

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After our last crack at buns that was a ADY poolish / YW version found here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33585/yw-poolish-hot-dog-buns

we decided to try a YW version only that also included a Tang Zhong portion of flour with the intent of further softening the crumb.

 

We also made some other changes by upping the hydration from 65% to 78% which was probably a little….eeeeerrrr…..a lot too much with the tang zhong and we got rid of the dry add ins; VWG, Toadies, white malt and the honey.  We made them smaller in length this time; 4 at 102 g each and the 2 longer ones were 131 g

 

The result was a bun that spread rather than springing like the last batch.  For some reason it didn’t color up as well even though it was egg washed and baked exactly the same as last time.  I’m guessing they won’t taste as good either since there were no toadies present but we shall see when we eat them for dinner

 

 Don’t forget to brush the buns with milk when they come out of the oven to keep them soft. We have Hot Italian sausage that require a larger bun length, white Brats, Boudin, and smoked sausage on tap for the filling with the usual Chicago pickled red onion, poblano and jalapeno peppers and home made Dijon mustard.

 

The crumb turned out as we expected.  No mustard will fall through it.  It took 20 minutes of slap and folds to get this dough to come together so… high hydration does not mean big holes every time.   We only fermented the dough for 45 minutes on the counter after 3 sets of S& F’s.  It also final proofed for 2 hours which probably wasn’t enough but…. we needed buns for dinner.

 The crumb came out like we thought it would, not so open the mustard would fall through.  Soft and moist and after the meat and the buns were grilled we plastic wrapped the meat in the buns so they could be steamed soft from the hot meat,  Delicious!  The pickled onion, poblano and jalapeno was the perfect topper.  We liked these buns and they turned out better than we thought they would.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Yeast Water

50

50

10

110

31.43%

Semolina

25

25

0

50

14.29%

AP

25

25

30

80

22.86%

Total

100

100

40

240

68.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

37.14%

 

 

 

Water

110

31.43%

 

 

 

Hydration

84.62%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

35.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Semolina

54

15.43%

 

 

 

AP

166

47.43%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

220

62.86%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.29%

 

 

 

Milk

125

35.71%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

56.82%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

350

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

235

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

67.14%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

0.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

78.71%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

683

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grains

0.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Egg

30

8.57%

 

 

 

Butter

30

8.57%

 

 

 

Cream Cheese

30

8.57%

 

 

 

Total

90

25.71%

 

 

 

 

20 g of dough flour was used for the Tang Zhong but 80 g of water was not included in the hydration calculations.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We’ve been working on an everyday white bread that has at least 25% whole grain flour.  This bread would need a soaker, scald or sprouted whole grain berries inside it to give the crumb some chew.  It would need some potato and oat in the mix since we love what they do for the rise. 

 

It would need to include some ground flax, sesame seeds and Toadies to give the crumb some healthy flecks of color and more flavor.  Including the Toadies we would want the bread to be over 40% whole grains

 

This bread is a variation of that theme using yogurt whey water for the majority of the dough liquid to give the already tangy SD even more pucker.  We went all out to get sour out of this bread by using a week old refrigerated 66% hydration, 50-50 mix, totaling 20 g, of our whole grain rye and whole wheat SD starters.

 

The levain was also retarded for 24 hours - 1 hour after the 3rd build feeding to enhance the sour of the levain.  All of the whole grain flours were in the levain to allow them the most time to be wet and get soft.

  

We simmered the scald for 20 minutes before allowing it to sit undisturbed on the counter for 6 hours.  The autolyse was 2 hours in length and included everything except the levain and the scald.   Once the autolyse met the levain it was at 77% hydration.  we did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F’s 20 minutes apart. 

  

We incorporated the large whole berry scald in the first set of S& F’s.  After completion of the last S&F, we allowed the dough to ferment on the counter in an oiled bowl for 30 minutes before going into the fridge for a 16 hour retard.

 

It more than doubled in the fridge.  After 15 minutes of warm up the next morning, we shaped the dough into a boule and put it into a lightly rice floured basket to final proof inside a used trash can liner.  After 1 ½ hours of final proof we fired up Big Old Betsy to 500 F.  This loaf was too big for the mini oven.

 

Once the oven hit 350 F we put (2) of Sylvia’s steaming pans and (1) 12” CI skillet full of lava rocks into the bottom of the oven to supply mega steam.   After Betsy said she was at temperature, we waited 15 more minutes to allow the top and bottom stone to get to temperature.

 

 We un-molded the bread from the basket onto a peel covered in parchment.  We slashed the boule T-Rex style with a pairing knife and slid it onto the bottom stone.  We turned the oven down to 450 F after 3 minutes and continued to steam for another 12 minutes.

 

At that point the steam came out and we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection.  After rotating the bread every 5 minutes 90 degrees on the stone to promote even browning, in 20 more minutes the bread was 203 F on the inside when we turned off the oven.  Baking time was 35 minutes total.  When the bread hit 205 F we cracked open the oven door and let the bread sit on the stone to crisp the crust for another 5 minutes.  The boule eventually hit  207 F after the 5 minute crisp and then we removed it to a cooling rack.

 

It browned up, sprang and bloomed nicely.  It s a quite handsome boule - if there is such a thing.  It sure smelled earthy and deliciously wheaty coming out of the oven and it had that tinge of semolina color on the crust.  No blisters but it wasn’t baked in the min oven either where blisters are common.

 

The crumb turned out as expected; open ,soft and moist with some gloss.  No one will ever ask "is this a sourdough bread?'  They will know it is a SD without question.  This is the kind of pucker we look for and hope it only gets better tomorrow.  Our most distinctly sour breads come from this metho of handling starter, levain and dough retarding  processes and using yogurt whey water for half the dough liquid.  This bread is the one you want for you everyday sourdough sandwich bread.  It is delicious, hearty, healthy and satisfying.

Breakfast  and lunch on bake day.  White DaPumpernickel for breakfast and this everyday bread for lunch.

 

Formula

WW and RyeSD

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.84%

Rye

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Farro

6

6

6

18

3.45%

WW

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Barley

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Spelt

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Water

40

40

0

80

15.36%

Total

90

70

30

190

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

24.95%

 

 

 

Water

90

17.27%

 

 

 

Hydration

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

16

3.07%

 

 

 

AP

325

62.38%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

391

75.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.92%

 

 

 

Whey 200 water 120

320

61.42%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

81.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

521

100.00%

 

 

 

Whey 200 and Water 210

410

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

78.69%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

25.95%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain w/ Toadies & Scald

42.11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.64%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,068

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.38%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

13

2.50%

 

 

 

Toadies

7

1.34%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

0.96%

 

 

 

Total

27

5.18%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

WW Berries

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Barley

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Farro

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Spelt Berrries

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Total Scald

100

19.19%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

And then, latter on, things went to hell in a hand basket in an instant.  It is getting to the point where even my apprentice doesn’t have a clue anymore.  She never had one in the first place, so she has an excuse and has plausible deniability…. unlike some others, like me.  But, some are still blameless because we were nearly almost close enough to call it that….. if you are not paying attention while  reading this ….which could be easy enough on your part.

 

It all started last Saturday, the day before Father’s Day, when we decided to have Sunday Gravy on the wrong day.   We were out of a lot of home made stuff that needed replenishing but decided to blow them off in favor of some fine Sunday Gravy on Saturday thinking  a it a better thing to do ….on the wrong day.

 

The Ezekiel bread was a odd choice.

The gravy went well and turned out tasty even though we only had hot Italian sausage and some pork chops that we flattened out and stuffed with cheeses, herbs and sausage and then rolled up into larger tied sausages that we browned in a pan.  The tomato sauce came out tasty too, just the way we like it, spicy and dark with the crushed red pepper, chicken stock, mushrooms, onions, Cabernet and Swiss chard.

 

So Fathers Day was set to make or finish making all the stuff we out of like kosher dill, bread and butter and Indian eggplant pickles, apricot jam, prickly pear jam and 3 bottles of arancello that had been sitting on skins since January.  The prickly pear and arancello are two main ingredients in a fine margarita we like …..so they so they went first.  Everything turned out just great.

  

Yesterday, I decided to make pizza for dinner, using the left over gravy for sauce,  and wanted to try a new crust recipe that didn’t require any retarding of the dough but used yeast water form the liquid, a pinch each of desem and rye SD starters and a pinch of ADY for a poolish all mixed into one combo levain.

We decided to do a 2 stage build starting at 10 AM hoping it would be ready with pizza hitting the stone at 6.45 PM.   We used 2 hours for both builds since all the starters can double in 3 hours in the summer.  By 2 PM the levain was mixed with the rest of the ingredients that had been autolysed for an hour.

 

We were looking forward to this dough since it was 32% whole multigrain with toadies for the first time.  All the whole grains were packed into the levain.  This dough also had almost 30% semolina in it too making it a little more Italian.

 

We did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F’s 15 minutes apart.  The home made sun dried tomato, garlic and rosemary were incorporated during the first S&F. The dough came together beautifully and was ready to go after 3 hours of proofing on the counter.  It smelled terrific.

 

The 3 hour proof gave us all kinds of time to make the pizza fixings.  Hot Italian sausage was browned first followed by caramelized; onions, mushrooms, poblano, hatch, jalapeno and green chilies that were browned in the same pan in succession.

 

We chopped up some basil, olives red peppers, green and red onion, made the mojo de ajo, grated the cheeses and found the pepperoni in the freezer.  We even had time to make a nice salad - something we never do on a pizza night.

 

Instead of making 2 smaller pizzas I decided to make one larger one and this is where things starter going wrong.  The crust formed perfectly, extensible yet strong but it was too big for the peel.

 

After hand forming I had rolled out the middle with my new, mini, black and green, alligator rolling pin found at Goodwill just for this purpose - it worked beautifully.  I covered it in mojo de ajo, docked it and prepared to par bake the crust for 3 minutes as we always do – but this was a don’t.

 

When I went to slide it onto the stone the front hung upon the peel sticking badly and back slid quite freely making the most beautiful, brown, 3” high ribbon candy that stone had ever seen.  Just perfect if one was making ribbon candy in a 500F oven on a pizza stone,

 

I immediately looked at my apprentice who muttered ‘Was für ein dummer Idiot’ under her growl while wisely running out of the kitchen as fast as she could.  I grabbed the dough off the 500 F stone no longer than 5-7 seconds after it landed - but that was plenty enough time to really change it into a different kind of pizza dough.

 

After reforming it as best we could it didn’t really have a discernable raised edge, was twice as thick as usual and was about 3 “ less in diameter than the original but it did barely fit the stone. We par baked the blob for a minute longer than usual, 4 minutes due to its thickness.  Then we loaded it up, no pepperoni or olives for my wife and no olives for the daughter and baked it for 8 more minutes - 3 minutes longer than normal in the top and bottom stone set up.

 

It wasn’t a complete disaster, and I can prove it.   For those who have grown used to near perfect pizza and having it for so long, this was quite a letdown.  The crust was nicely brown on the top and bottom, crispy and very tasty but …..not at all close to being right either.  No one said this was the best pizza or pizza crust ever but, the proof that it wasn’t a total disaster is that the pizza is gone and no one touched the salad.

 

Can’t wait to make this crust again and see what it is really like when not final shaped into ribbon candy and scorched on a blazing hot pizza stone while loading.  The one thing I learned is that Sunday Gravy made on Saturday for a Monday pizza sauce is the way to go every time.

My wife pinched off a little bit of the salad this morning for her bag lunch sandwich.

Formula

YW, WW & RyeSD Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Rye & WW SD Starter

10

0

10

5.88%

Multigrain Mix

0

23

23

13.53%

Semolina

0

17

17

10.00%

Toadies

0

10

10

5.88%

Whole Wheat

20

0

20

11.76%

AP

25

0

25

14.71%

Yeast Water

45

25

70

41.18%

Water

0

0

0

0.00%

Total

100

75

175

102.94%

 

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

100

58.82%

 

 

Water

75

44.12%

 

 

Starter Hydration

75.00%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

35.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Semolina

50

29.41%

 

 

AP

120

70.59%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

170

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

5

1.85%

 

 

Dough Water

125

73.53%

 

 

Dough Hydration

73.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

VWG & DE. 5 g each

10

5.88%

 

 

Olive oil

15

8.82%

 

 

Total

25

14.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

270

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

74.07%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

71.43%

 

 

 

Total Weight

500

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

32.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One small clove of garlic

 

 

 

 

1 g of dried roemary

 

 

 

 

1/2 sun dried tomato

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We are down to baking bread on Friday’s only now and outside in the mini oven at that until the amount of bread in the freezer disappears and the temperature gets below 90 F - sometime in late September.  We went with a more simple multigrain formula this time with 6 of them in the levain only.

 

We ended up at 40% whole grains if you discount the whole grain sprouts and the effect the toadies would have it they weren’t separated out of whole grains for a separate toast.  Including the toadies and sprouts we would be at 60% whole grains – 50% just with the sprouts.

 

We used 2 dough flours AP and semolina – the left over from Golden Temple Durum Atta where we had previously sifted out the atta (bran) to make toadies.  We went with 5 of the levain whole grains to make the larger amount of sprouts for this smaller sized loaf.

  

We limited the add ins to Toadies, red and white malts and some toasted and ground golden and brown flax seeds and white, brown and black sesame seeds.  Then for some seed chew we added 50 g of sunflower and pumpkin seeds to the dough and reserved 40 g to do some kind of seed art on the outside of the chacon.

  

After seeing Ian’s fine chacon example this week we wanted to get back to an earlier bake where seeds really spiffed up the outside of a chacon.  My apprentice thought with some actual design for a change the bread wouldn’t suffer any.

 

There were two levains for this bake.  A yeast water levain that was two builds of 3 hours each using 50 g of YW and 124 g total.   There is also a SD levain 3 stage one that was built separately.  It totaled 156 g and was initiated with equal parts totaling 12 g of our rye sour and WW starters.  Both the SD and the YW levains were refrigerated for 24 hours at the 6 hour build mark right after the 3rd feeding of the SD.

 

When removed from the fridge at noon the next day, the SD levain was allowed to do its final double while the YW levain just sat on the counter warming up while going for a ride with its SD buddy.

 

We autolysed the dough flours, ground seeds, salt, malts and toadies with the dough water while the 2 levains did their thing in the afternoon…about 2 ½ hours.  Once the autolyse met the levains, we did 10 minutes of Slap and folds until the dough was silky smooth and the gluten well developed. 

 

Breakfast on bake day.  This bread found here  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33480/dark-russian-jewish-deli-rye-porter-onion-sprouts-and-aromatic-seeds

We did 3 sets of S&F’s and incorporated the sprouts on the first set and the pumpkin and sunflower seeds on the 2nd one. By the 3rd set all the seeds and sprouts were well distributed.  After a 25 minute rest we started the chacon artwork. 

 

First, a 100g Franz Joseph roll went into the bottom of the basket and part of the reserved seeds were laid next to it so they should be on the outside of the 150 g (2) rope braid that covered the seeds while surrounding the central roll.   Then we made (10) 1” balls and placed them next to the rope braid climbing the inside of the basket in one layer.  Then the rest of the seeds were placed next to the balls.

 

Then a reverse bialy was made where the edges were much thinner than the middle - in an oval shape so that the dough would match the basket and to make the dough be the same thickness throughout the finished loaf.  After forming, we immediately put the basket in a used trash can liner and placed it in the fridge for a 15 hour retard.

 

It proofed up nicely while in the fridge so when it came out of the fridge all it really had to do is warm up.  When ready we un-molded it onto the parchment covering the vented top of the broiler pan of the mini oven after warming up 2 of Sylvia’s steaming cups in the microwave.

 

We decided to go without the bottom of the broiler pan that would usually have extra water in it.  We tossed 1/2 C of water into the bottom of the oven as we shut the door on the 500 F preheated mini oven.  2 minutes later we turned the oven sown to 450 F and continued to steam for 13 minutes.

 

What a great lunch for a hot Friday.  Sweet potato, tomato, home grown salad greens, hot pepper jack chunks, sliced carrots, cukes, red and  black raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, cantaloupe. red pepper, avocado, home made Southwest hummus on a few lime tortilla chips.  The sammy is a grilled chicken, brie, tomato and lettuce.

At the 15 minute mark the steam came out of the oven and we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.  We turned the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes and it registered 205 F 25 minutes after the steam came out – 40 minutes total baking time.

 

The crust browned up very nicely and the design was unusual with the seeds showing up where they were supposed to poke out.  It stayed crunchy too.  The crumb turned out light, moist and fairly open for a bread with a high amount of whole grains and lots of tasty tuff in it   Best of all it is a terrific toasting bread, so earthy,chew and complex.  Could eat it all day but.... my daughter is taking it to her boyfriend in Tuscon tonight after dinner as he loves my seeded breads like this one.

How did that apple crisp get in there?  Maybe Lucy had something to do with it?  She looks guilty if you ask me.

Breakfast at Brownman's. 1 slice of maple cured bacon, hashbrowns, an egg,  cantaloupe, straw and blue berries, toast with homemade strawberry jam.

Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Rye, Spelt & WW SD Starter

12

0

0

12

4.80%

Buckwheat

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Spelt

11

8

6

25

10.00%

Dark Rye

11

8

6

25

10.00%

Whole Wheat

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Farro

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Barley

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Yeast Water

50

0

0

50

20.00%

Water

12

24

36

72

28.80%

Total

136

72

72

280

112.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

152

60.80%

 

 

 

Water

128

51.20%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

84.21%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

29.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Semolina

50

20.00%

 

 

 

AP

200

80.00%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

250

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.99%

 

 

 

Dough Water

190

76.00%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Farro

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Spelt

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Rye

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Barley

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Total Scald & Soak

100

40.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

1.20%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

1.20%

 

 

 

Toadies

15

6.00%

 

 

 

Sunflower & Pumpkin Seed

90

36.00%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame

15

6.00%

 

 

 

Total

126

50.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

402

 

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

318

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

79.10%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

75.18%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

954

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain-  NI Scald

43.03%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain - with Scald

52.20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50 G of Pumpkin and sunflower seeds are in the dough.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

It was time for hamburger night.  A little early really but Lucy says she might be from there and possibly was feeling a little homesick.  There was no time for SD so we went with a quick biga using a pinch of ADY.  It was ready to go in just 6 hours.

 

We did a 1hour autolyse, mixed everything together and did 10 minutes of slap and folds followed by 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 minute increments.  The dough felt much wetter than the hydration level would warrant.  We used sour cream in place of the cream cheese in the hit dog buns.

 

After proofing for 2 hours, the 4 buns were egg washed and then baked at 350 F convection, in the mini oven for 20 minutes, rotating them every 5 minutes.    They came out splotchy brown which was weird for egg washed buns.  We forgot to wash them with milk while still hot.  They were still fairly soft curst wise.

 

The crumb was soft and moist.   They tasted OK for white bread and when grilled with the hamburgers they went glossy dark brown on the crust and were much more tasty.  The fixings included caramelized; poblano peppers, onions and mushrooms, maple smoked bacon, home grown tomato, lettuce, pepper jack and brie cheeses.  Sides were the usual sweet and regular baked, seasoned steak fries.

  

All in all, it was a nice dinner where the buns stood up well to the piling on with the fixings and stayed together without falling apart while munching on them.

Even better 2 days later for lunch with the bun steamed in the microwave.  Daughter could only eat half of her hamburger the other night so it made a great lunch addition today.

Formula

Biga

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Pinch of yeast

0

0

0

0.00%

AP

50

25

75

26.32%

Water

50

0

50

17.54%

Total

100

25

125

43.86%

 

 

 

 

 

YW & Poolish

 

%

 

 

Flour

75

26.32%

 

 

Water

50

17.54%

 

 

Hydration

66.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

0

21.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

3.51%

 

 

AP

200

70.18%

 

 

Dough Flour

210

73.68%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

2.11%

 

 

Milk

130

45.61%

 

 

Dough Hydration

61.90%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

285

100.00%

 

 

Water

180

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

63.16%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

0.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.46%

 

 

 

Total Weight

575

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Egg

44

15.44%

 

 

Butter

25

8.77%

 

 

Dough Enhancer

5

1.75%

 

 

Sour Cream

10

3.51%

 

 

Olive Oil

5

1.75%

 

 

Honey

10

3.51%

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.75%

 

 

Total

104

36.49%

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We are now officially on the summer baking schedule.  No more large loaves.  Only 1 small one or possibly 2 if baked on the same day.  All bred baking is done in the mini oven outside.   This particular bake came in at over 1,300 g so it will have to be baked as 2 loaves one after the other to fit the mini oven.  Lucy isn’t quick with basic math.

 

My apprentice quickly forgets just about everything and the size of a loaf that fits in the MO is something she never knew to begin with - like every thing else worth knowing.   I have noticed that she is really good at hunting geckos, eating them and then upchucking the gooey mess on your summer bare feet.  Amazing really…. so don’t think you can catch a gecko with your bare teeth like she can.

 

This bread is what I would call our almost everyday bread that we would like to eat if we ever made the same bread more than once and had a favorite one dominating our bake list.  Thankfully, my apprentice forgets what that last bake was much less what her favorite might be other than knowing DaPumperizing any bread is way better than not doing so.

 

.The only thing missing is a dried fruit, I had a variety of them laid out and ready to be included but Lucy forgot all about them.  When I asked, she said that with the molasses and honey already in the mix, the sweetness of the fruits wasn’t needed.  Odd how these recipes come together especially after traversing torturously through such a tiny brain as hers.

 

We were going for multi grain sour so we used 10 g each of our rye and whole wheat starters and used all the whole grains in the 3 stage levain.  The whole grains ended up at 36% if you do not include the wholegrain soaker and the levain was 20% of the total weight.  We like to use a larger levain when making a bread that is jam packed full of add ins.

 

We refrigerated the levain for 24 hours after it had risen 25% after the 3rd stage feeding to increase the sour.  It rose another 25% in the fridge before being warmed up and allowed to finish its 3 stage doubling the next morning.  The whole grains in the levain included, barley, farro, spelt, wheat, and  rye.  Lucy tries to keep the whole grains in the levain so they have a really good chance of softening up as much as possible.

 

We added some corn, oats and potato to the AP dough flour because we like the flavors they bring to the party.  We scalded; whole wheat, rye, barley, farro, and spelt berries before putting them in the fridge overnight to soak and soften up.  They were well drained before being added to the dough.

 

The add ins included home made red and white malt, honey, molasses, ground flax and ground sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and pistachios,. We tossed in some Toadies since they are nearly required to enhance the flavor of every bake and a little VWG to bring up the gluten to an acceptable level .

Bake day breakfast.

The autolyse included everything except the pumpkinseeds, sunflower seeds, pistachio nuts and the whole berry scald.   The autolyse was done while the levain warmed up and finished doubling in the morning - about 3 hours.

 

Once the levain and the autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds to develop the gluten and then let it rest for 15 minutes in an covered and oiled bowl.  We did 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 minute intervals where the scald and remaining seeds and nuts were incorporated on the first one and thoroughly distributed by the third set.  After a 1 hour ferment on the counter, into the fridge it went for its 16 hour bulk retard.

 

After taking the dough out of the fridge we divided it in half and then refrigerated half.  This way we could maintain a time window of 45 minutes between the 2 loaves.  This accounted for one loaf to bake off, the oven come back to temperature with steam in place and be oven be ready just in time for the 2nd loaf.

 

We shaped the dough cold into small ovals and for a little excitement, the first one we proofed seam side down so it would bake seam side up without slashing and the 2nd one we placed seam side up and slashed it.  The bread was ready to into the oven 2 1/2 hours after coming out of the fridge.

 

The mini oven was pre heated to 500 F and (2) of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups, half full of water with a dish rag in each, were heated in the microwave.  We overturned the bread cross wise onto the top of the vented broiler pan covered in parchment paper.  The bottom of the broiler pan was preheated in the mini oven.

 

This bread made a fine balogna and brie sandwich with veggies, fruits and cheese.

A half a cup of water was put in the bottom of the broiler pan right before the broiler top, with the bread and steaming cups was placed on top of it.  The small space where the bread takes up 25% of it and the mega steam applied usually makes the mini put crust on bread like a commercial bakery oven.   Our best breads have always come the mini oven.

 

How did that stir fry from last night's dinner get in there? 

Once the bread went in, we steamed for 2 minutes and then turned the oven down to 450 F for 13 more minutes.  At the 15 minute mark, the bottom of the broiler pan came out with Sylvia’s steaming cups and the bread was left to bake on the top of the broiler pan at 400 F, convection this time.

We turned the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes and flipped itnover on the top for the last 10 minutes of baking to get the bottom as brown as the top 20 minutes after the steam came out the bread tested 205 F on the inside at 35 minutes total baking time. 

Once removed to the cooling rack we noticed that the bread had not cracked mightily along the seam as we thought it would.  It wasn’t a lack of steam, possibly 98% proofed?   It did brown nicely, was crunchy with very small blisters and it smelled great.

The 2nd loaf was slashed before it went in the mini oven and baked the same way. It to did not spring or bloom much and did not bake as dark on the outside.  It too softened a little as it cooled but the crust was still crunchy and very tasty. 

With the crumb not as open as our usual, maybe the bread was under proofed?   The crumb was soft and moist like always.   Maybe there was just so much stuff in this bread it had a hard time getting lift?  Usually we would put YW in these kinds of breads to open the crumb and probably should have this time.  It passed the poke test and it looked like it had nearly doubled though.

The great thing about this bread is that it is a fine tasting bread.  My daughter said this is the only bread I should make.  The flour mix, corn, potato, scald, Toadies, ground flax and sesame seed, pistachios pumpkin and sunflower seeds really make this a tasty treat.

Formula

WW and RyeSD

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.66%

Rye

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Farro

4

8

18

30

5.49%

WW

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Barley

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Spelt

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Water

20

40

40

100

18.32%

Total

60

80

130

270

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

160

29.30%

 

 

 

Water

110

20.15%

 

 

 

Hydration

68.75%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Corn Meal

12

2.20%

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

12

2.20%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

2.20%

 

 

 

AP

350

64.10%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

386

70.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.83%

 

 

 

Water

310

56.78%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

80.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

546

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

420

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.92%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

35.90%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.91%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,319

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.55%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.55%

 

 

 

Honey & Molasses

20

3.66%

 

 

 

Pumpkin 30, Sunflower 30 & Pistachio 50

110

20.15%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

20

3.66%

 

 

 

Hemp & Chia Seeds

40

7.33%

 

 

 

Toadies

12

2.20%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.83%

 

 

 

Total

218

39.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

WW Berries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Barley

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Farro

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Spelt Berrries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Total Scald

125

22.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

 

Dough weighed 1,400 g with wet scald

 

 

 

 

 

Bread weighed 622 g each after baking

 

 

 

 

 

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