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dabrownman

And then, latter on, things went to hell in a hand basket in an instant.  It is getting to the point where even my apprentice doesn’t have a clue anymore.  She never had one in the first place, so she has an excuse and has plausible deniability…. unlike some others, like me.  But, some are still blameless because we were nearly almost close enough to call it that….. if you are not paying attention while  reading this ….which could be easy enough on your part.

 

It all started last Saturday, the day before Father’s Day, when we decided to have Sunday Gravy on the wrong day.   We were out of a lot of home made stuff that needed replenishing but decided to blow them off in favor of some fine Sunday Gravy on Saturday thinking  a it a better thing to do ….on the wrong day.

 

The Ezekiel bread was a odd choice.

The gravy went well and turned out tasty even though we only had hot Italian sausage and some pork chops that we flattened out and stuffed with cheeses, herbs and sausage and then rolled up into larger tied sausages that we browned in a pan.  The tomato sauce came out tasty too, just the way we like it, spicy and dark with the crushed red pepper, chicken stock, mushrooms, onions, Cabernet and Swiss chard.

 

So Fathers Day was set to make or finish making all the stuff we out of like kosher dill, bread and butter and Indian eggplant pickles, apricot jam, prickly pear jam and 3 bottles of arancello that had been sitting on skins since January.  The prickly pear and arancello are two main ingredients in a fine margarita we like …..so they so they went first.  Everything turned out just great.

  

Yesterday, I decided to make pizza for dinner, using the left over gravy for sauce,  and wanted to try a new crust recipe that didn’t require any retarding of the dough but used yeast water form the liquid, a pinch each of desem and rye SD starters and a pinch of ADY for a poolish all mixed into one combo levain.

We decided to do a 2 stage build starting at 10 AM hoping it would be ready with pizza hitting the stone at 6.45 PM.   We used 2 hours for both builds since all the starters can double in 3 hours in the summer.  By 2 PM the levain was mixed with the rest of the ingredients that had been autolysed for an hour.

 

We were looking forward to this dough since it was 32% whole multigrain with toadies for the first time.  All the whole grains were packed into the levain.  This dough also had almost 30% semolina in it too making it a little more Italian.

 

We did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F’s 15 minutes apart.  The home made sun dried tomato, garlic and rosemary were incorporated during the first S&F. The dough came together beautifully and was ready to go after 3 hours of proofing on the counter.  It smelled terrific.

 

The 3 hour proof gave us all kinds of time to make the pizza fixings.  Hot Italian sausage was browned first followed by caramelized; onions, mushrooms, poblano, hatch, jalapeno and green chilies that were browned in the same pan in succession.

 

We chopped up some basil, olives red peppers, green and red onion, made the mojo de ajo, grated the cheeses and found the pepperoni in the freezer.  We even had time to make a nice salad - something we never do on a pizza night.

 

Instead of making 2 smaller pizzas I decided to make one larger one and this is where things starter going wrong.  The crust formed perfectly, extensible yet strong but it was too big for the peel.

 

After hand forming I had rolled out the middle with my new, mini, black and green, alligator rolling pin found at Goodwill just for this purpose - it worked beautifully.  I covered it in mojo de ajo, docked it and prepared to par bake the crust for 3 minutes as we always do – but this was a don’t.

 

When I went to slide it onto the stone the front hung upon the peel sticking badly and back slid quite freely making the most beautiful, brown, 3” high ribbon candy that stone had ever seen.  Just perfect if one was making ribbon candy in a 500F oven on a pizza stone,

 

I immediately looked at my apprentice who muttered ‘Was für ein dummer Idiot’ under her growl while wisely running out of the kitchen as fast as she could.  I grabbed the dough off the 500 F stone no longer than 5-7 seconds after it landed - but that was plenty enough time to really change it into a different kind of pizza dough.

 

After reforming it as best we could it didn’t really have a discernable raised edge, was twice as thick as usual and was about 3 “ less in diameter than the original but it did barely fit the stone. We par baked the blob for a minute longer than usual, 4 minutes due to its thickness.  Then we loaded it up, no pepperoni or olives for my wife and no olives for the daughter and baked it for 8 more minutes - 3 minutes longer than normal in the top and bottom stone set up.

 

It wasn’t a complete disaster, and I can prove it.   For those who have grown used to near perfect pizza and having it for so long, this was quite a letdown.  The crust was nicely brown on the top and bottom, crispy and very tasty but …..not at all close to being right either.  No one said this was the best pizza or pizza crust ever but, the proof that it wasn’t a total disaster is that the pizza is gone and no one touched the salad.

 

Can’t wait to make this crust again and see what it is really like when not final shaped into ribbon candy and scorched on a blazing hot pizza stone while loading.  The one thing I learned is that Sunday Gravy made on Saturday for a Monday pizza sauce is the way to go every time.

My wife pinched off a little bit of the salad this morning for her bag lunch sandwich.

Formula

YW, WW & RyeSD Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Rye & WW SD Starter

10

0

10

5.88%

Multigrain Mix

0

23

23

13.53%

Semolina

0

17

17

10.00%

Toadies

0

10

10

5.88%

Whole Wheat

20

0

20

11.76%

AP

25

0

25

14.71%

Yeast Water

45

25

70

41.18%

Water

0

0

0

0.00%

Total

100

75

175

102.94%

 

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

100

58.82%

 

 

Water

75

44.12%

 

 

Starter Hydration

75.00%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

35.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Semolina

50

29.41%

 

 

AP

120

70.59%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

170

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

5

1.85%

 

 

Dough Water

125

73.53%

 

 

Dough Hydration

73.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

VWG & DE. 5 g each

10

5.88%

 

 

Olive oil

15

8.82%

 

 

Total

25

14.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

270

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

74.07%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

71.43%

 

 

 

Total Weight

500

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

32.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One small clove of garlic

 

 

 

 

1 g of dried roemary

 

 

 

 

1/2 sun dried tomato

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We are down to baking bread on Friday’s only now and outside in the mini oven at that until the amount of bread in the freezer disappears and the temperature gets below 90 F - sometime in late September.  We went with a more simple multigrain formula this time with 6 of them in the levain only.

 

We ended up at 40% whole grains if you discount the whole grain sprouts and the effect the toadies would have it they weren’t separated out of whole grains for a separate toast.  Including the toadies and sprouts we would be at 60% whole grains – 50% just with the sprouts.

 

We used 2 dough flours AP and semolina – the left over from Golden Temple Durum Atta where we had previously sifted out the atta (bran) to make toadies.  We went with 5 of the levain whole grains to make the larger amount of sprouts for this smaller sized loaf.

  

We limited the add ins to Toadies, red and white malts and some toasted and ground golden and brown flax seeds and white, brown and black sesame seeds.  Then for some seed chew we added 50 g of sunflower and pumpkin seeds to the dough and reserved 40 g to do some kind of seed art on the outside of the chacon.

  

After seeing Ian’s fine chacon example this week we wanted to get back to an earlier bake where seeds really spiffed up the outside of a chacon.  My apprentice thought with some actual design for a change the bread wouldn’t suffer any.

 

There were two levains for this bake.  A yeast water levain that was two builds of 3 hours each using 50 g of YW and 124 g total.   There is also a SD levain 3 stage one that was built separately.  It totaled 156 g and was initiated with equal parts totaling 12 g of our rye sour and WW starters.  Both the SD and the YW levains were refrigerated for 24 hours at the 6 hour build mark right after the 3rd feeding of the SD.

 

When removed from the fridge at noon the next day, the SD levain was allowed to do its final double while the YW levain just sat on the counter warming up while going for a ride with its SD buddy.

 

We autolysed the dough flours, ground seeds, salt, malts and toadies with the dough water while the 2 levains did their thing in the afternoon…about 2 ½ hours.  Once the autolyse met the levains, we did 10 minutes of Slap and folds until the dough was silky smooth and the gluten well developed. 

 

Breakfast on bake day.  This bread found here  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33480/dark-russian-jewish-deli-rye-porter-onion-sprouts-and-aromatic-seeds

We did 3 sets of S&F’s and incorporated the sprouts on the first set and the pumpkin and sunflower seeds on the 2nd one. By the 3rd set all the seeds and sprouts were well distributed.  After a 25 minute rest we started the chacon artwork. 

 

First, a 100g Franz Joseph roll went into the bottom of the basket and part of the reserved seeds were laid next to it so they should be on the outside of the 150 g (2) rope braid that covered the seeds while surrounding the central roll.   Then we made (10) 1” balls and placed them next to the rope braid climbing the inside of the basket in one layer.  Then the rest of the seeds were placed next to the balls.

 

Then a reverse bialy was made where the edges were much thinner than the middle - in an oval shape so that the dough would match the basket and to make the dough be the same thickness throughout the finished loaf.  After forming, we immediately put the basket in a used trash can liner and placed it in the fridge for a 15 hour retard.

 

It proofed up nicely while in the fridge so when it came out of the fridge all it really had to do is warm up.  When ready we un-molded it onto the parchment covering the vented top of the broiler pan of the mini oven after warming up 2 of Sylvia’s steaming cups in the microwave.

 

We decided to go without the bottom of the broiler pan that would usually have extra water in it.  We tossed 1/2 C of water into the bottom of the oven as we shut the door on the 500 F preheated mini oven.  2 minutes later we turned the oven sown to 450 F and continued to steam for 13 minutes.

 

What a great lunch for a hot Friday.  Sweet potato, tomato, home grown salad greens, hot pepper jack chunks, sliced carrots, cukes, red and  black raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, cantaloupe. red pepper, avocado, home made Southwest hummus on a few lime tortilla chips.  The sammy is a grilled chicken, brie, tomato and lettuce.

At the 15 minute mark the steam came out of the oven and we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.  We turned the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes and it registered 205 F 25 minutes after the steam came out – 40 minutes total baking time.

 

The crust browned up very nicely and the design was unusual with the seeds showing up where they were supposed to poke out.  It stayed crunchy too.  The crumb turned out light, moist and fairly open for a bread with a high amount of whole grains and lots of tasty tuff in it   Best of all it is a terrific toasting bread, so earthy,chew and complex.  Could eat it all day but.... my daughter is taking it to her boyfriend in Tuscon tonight after dinner as he loves my seeded breads like this one.

How did that apple crisp get in there?  Maybe Lucy had something to do with it?  She looks guilty if you ask me.

Breakfast at Brownman's. 1 slice of maple cured bacon, hashbrowns, an egg,  cantaloupe, straw and blue berries, toast with homemade strawberry jam.

Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Rye, Spelt & WW SD Starter

12

0

0

12

4.80%

Buckwheat

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Spelt

11

8

6

25

10.00%

Dark Rye

11

8

6

25

10.00%

Whole Wheat

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Farro

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Barley

10

8

6

24

9.60%

Yeast Water

50

0

0

50

20.00%

Water

12

24

36

72

28.80%

Total

136

72

72

280

112.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

152

60.80%

 

 

 

Water

128

51.20%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

84.21%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

29.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Semolina

50

20.00%

 

 

 

AP

200

80.00%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

250

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.99%

 

 

 

Dough Water

190

76.00%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Farro

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Spelt

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Rye

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Barley

20

8.00%

 

 

 

Total Scald & Soak

100

40.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

1.20%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

1.20%

 

 

 

Toadies

15

6.00%

 

 

 

Sunflower & Pumpkin Seed

90

36.00%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame

15

6.00%

 

 

 

Total

126

50.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

402

 

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

318

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

79.10%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

75.18%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

954

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain-  NI Scald

43.03%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain - with Scald

52.20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50 G of Pumpkin and sunflower seeds are in the dough.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

It was time for hamburger night.  A little early really but Lucy says she might be from there and possibly was feeling a little homesick.  There was no time for SD so we went with a quick biga using a pinch of ADY.  It was ready to go in just 6 hours.

 

We did a 1hour autolyse, mixed everything together and did 10 minutes of slap and folds followed by 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 minute increments.  The dough felt much wetter than the hydration level would warrant.  We used sour cream in place of the cream cheese in the hit dog buns.

 

After proofing for 2 hours, the 4 buns were egg washed and then baked at 350 F convection, in the mini oven for 20 minutes, rotating them every 5 minutes.    They came out splotchy brown which was weird for egg washed buns.  We forgot to wash them with milk while still hot.  They were still fairly soft curst wise.

 

The crumb was soft and moist.   They tasted OK for white bread and when grilled with the hamburgers they went glossy dark brown on the crust and were much more tasty.  The fixings included caramelized; poblano peppers, onions and mushrooms, maple smoked bacon, home grown tomato, lettuce, pepper jack and brie cheeses.  Sides were the usual sweet and regular baked, seasoned steak fries.

  

All in all, it was a nice dinner where the buns stood up well to the piling on with the fixings and stayed together without falling apart while munching on them.

Even better 2 days later for lunch with the bun steamed in the microwave.  Daughter could only eat half of her hamburger the other night so it made a great lunch addition today.

Formula

Biga

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Pinch of yeast

0

0

0

0.00%

AP

50

25

75

26.32%

Water

50

0

50

17.54%

Total

100

25

125

43.86%

 

 

 

 

 

YW & Poolish

 

%

 

 

Flour

75

26.32%

 

 

Water

50

17.54%

 

 

Hydration

66.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

0

21.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

3.51%

 

 

AP

200

70.18%

 

 

Dough Flour

210

73.68%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

2.11%

 

 

Milk

130

45.61%

 

 

Dough Hydration

61.90%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

285

100.00%

 

 

Water

180

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

63.16%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

0.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.46%

 

 

 

Total Weight

575

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Egg

44

15.44%

 

 

Butter

25

8.77%

 

 

Dough Enhancer

5

1.75%

 

 

Sour Cream

10

3.51%

 

 

Olive Oil

5

1.75%

 

 

Honey

10

3.51%

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.75%

 

 

Total

104

36.49%

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We are now officially on the summer baking schedule.  No more large loaves.  Only 1 small one or possibly 2 if baked on the same day.  All bred baking is done in the mini oven outside.   This particular bake came in at over 1,300 g so it will have to be baked as 2 loaves one after the other to fit the mini oven.  Lucy isn’t quick with basic math.

 

My apprentice quickly forgets just about everything and the size of a loaf that fits in the MO is something she never knew to begin with - like every thing else worth knowing.   I have noticed that she is really good at hunting geckos, eating them and then upchucking the gooey mess on your summer bare feet.  Amazing really…. so don’t think you can catch a gecko with your bare teeth like she can.

 

This bread is what I would call our almost everyday bread that we would like to eat if we ever made the same bread more than once and had a favorite one dominating our bake list.  Thankfully, my apprentice forgets what that last bake was much less what her favorite might be other than knowing DaPumperizing any bread is way better than not doing so.

 

.The only thing missing is a dried fruit, I had a variety of them laid out and ready to be included but Lucy forgot all about them.  When I asked, she said that with the molasses and honey already in the mix, the sweetness of the fruits wasn’t needed.  Odd how these recipes come together especially after traversing torturously through such a tiny brain as hers.

 

We were going for multi grain sour so we used 10 g each of our rye and whole wheat starters and used all the whole grains in the 3 stage levain.  The whole grains ended up at 36% if you do not include the wholegrain soaker and the levain was 20% of the total weight.  We like to use a larger levain when making a bread that is jam packed full of add ins.

 

We refrigerated the levain for 24 hours after it had risen 25% after the 3rd stage feeding to increase the sour.  It rose another 25% in the fridge before being warmed up and allowed to finish its 3 stage doubling the next morning.  The whole grains in the levain included, barley, farro, spelt, wheat, and  rye.  Lucy tries to keep the whole grains in the levain so they have a really good chance of softening up as much as possible.

 

We added some corn, oats and potato to the AP dough flour because we like the flavors they bring to the party.  We scalded; whole wheat, rye, barley, farro, and spelt berries before putting them in the fridge overnight to soak and soften up.  They were well drained before being added to the dough.

 

The add ins included home made red and white malt, honey, molasses, ground flax and ground sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and pistachios,. We tossed in some Toadies since they are nearly required to enhance the flavor of every bake and a little VWG to bring up the gluten to an acceptable level .

Bake day breakfast.

The autolyse included everything except the pumpkinseeds, sunflower seeds, pistachio nuts and the whole berry scald.   The autolyse was done while the levain warmed up and finished doubling in the morning - about 3 hours.

 

Once the levain and the autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds to develop the gluten and then let it rest for 15 minutes in an covered and oiled bowl.  We did 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 minute intervals where the scald and remaining seeds and nuts were incorporated on the first one and thoroughly distributed by the third set.  After a 1 hour ferment on the counter, into the fridge it went for its 16 hour bulk retard.

 

After taking the dough out of the fridge we divided it in half and then refrigerated half.  This way we could maintain a time window of 45 minutes between the 2 loaves.  This accounted for one loaf to bake off, the oven come back to temperature with steam in place and be oven be ready just in time for the 2nd loaf.

 

We shaped the dough cold into small ovals and for a little excitement, the first one we proofed seam side down so it would bake seam side up without slashing and the 2nd one we placed seam side up and slashed it.  The bread was ready to into the oven 2 1/2 hours after coming out of the fridge.

 

The mini oven was pre heated to 500 F and (2) of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups, half full of water with a dish rag in each, were heated in the microwave.  We overturned the bread cross wise onto the top of the vented broiler pan covered in parchment paper.  The bottom of the broiler pan was preheated in the mini oven.

 

This bread made a fine balogna and brie sandwich with veggies, fruits and cheese.

A half a cup of water was put in the bottom of the broiler pan right before the broiler top, with the bread and steaming cups was placed on top of it.  The small space where the bread takes up 25% of it and the mega steam applied usually makes the mini put crust on bread like a commercial bakery oven.   Our best breads have always come the mini oven.

 

How did that stir fry from last night's dinner get in there? 

Once the bread went in, we steamed for 2 minutes and then turned the oven down to 450 F for 13 more minutes.  At the 15 minute mark, the bottom of the broiler pan came out with Sylvia’s steaming cups and the bread was left to bake on the top of the broiler pan at 400 F, convection this time.

We turned the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes and flipped itnover on the top for the last 10 minutes of baking to get the bottom as brown as the top 20 minutes after the steam came out the bread tested 205 F on the inside at 35 minutes total baking time. 

Once removed to the cooling rack we noticed that the bread had not cracked mightily along the seam as we thought it would.  It wasn’t a lack of steam, possibly 98% proofed?   It did brown nicely, was crunchy with very small blisters and it smelled great.

The 2nd loaf was slashed before it went in the mini oven and baked the same way. It to did not spring or bloom much and did not bake as dark on the outside.  It too softened a little as it cooled but the crust was still crunchy and very tasty. 

With the crumb not as open as our usual, maybe the bread was under proofed?   The crumb was soft and moist like always.   Maybe there was just so much stuff in this bread it had a hard time getting lift?  Usually we would put YW in these kinds of breads to open the crumb and probably should have this time.  It passed the poke test and it looked like it had nearly doubled though.

The great thing about this bread is that it is a fine tasting bread.  My daughter said this is the only bread I should make.  The flour mix, corn, potato, scald, Toadies, ground flax and sesame seed, pistachios pumpkin and sunflower seeds really make this a tasty treat.

Formula

WW and RyeSD

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.66%

Rye

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Farro

4

8

18

30

5.49%

WW

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Barley

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Spelt

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Water

20

40

40

100

18.32%

Total

60

80

130

270

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

160

29.30%

 

 

 

Water

110

20.15%

 

 

 

Hydration

68.75%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Corn Meal

12

2.20%

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

12

2.20%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

2.20%

 

 

 

AP

350

64.10%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

386

70.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.83%

 

 

 

Water

310

56.78%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

80.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

546

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

420

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.92%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

35.90%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.91%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,319

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.55%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.55%

 

 

 

Honey & Molasses

20

3.66%

 

 

 

Pumpkin 30, Sunflower 30 & Pistachio 50

110

20.15%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

20

3.66%

 

 

 

Hemp & Chia Seeds

40

7.33%

 

 

 

Toadies

12

2.20%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.83%

 

 

 

Total

218

39.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

WW Berries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Barley

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Farro

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Spelt Berrries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Total Scald

125

22.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

 

Dough weighed 1,400 g with wet scald

 

 

 

 

 

Bread weighed 622 g each after baking

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Having never made Ezekiel Bread before, this was a real treat for Lucy.  Us older ex-Hippie types haven’t made it for decades.   One reason is the 2 day sprouting for the beans and rice in one large pile and then sprouting whole grains in another.

 

Then you mix half of each pile, add the dough liquid to it and then chop them up in a mini Cuisinart chopper.  Chop them into the smallest pieces you can for adding to the dough as a horrible looking gruel .....that doesn’t smell too good either.  My apprentice appreciated me thinking of her by having this mix smell especially horrid.

 

There were 3 leavens for this recipe; SD, YW and a poolish.  Ezekiel is famous for rising from the dead and making the bread named after him into bricks.  He nmght do this just for fun or possibly spite since he was forced to eat an unleavened version of this bread for two years while wandering in a harsh desert.  I’d really be mad about that but maybe gladder at being alive at the end of the ordeal…. I guess.

 

The leavens were not made from sprouted grains but were made in (3) 4 hour builds.   The SD portion was then refrigerated overnight.   The poolish took 12 hours to double after the last feeding as did the YW levain.  Why they were so slow is unknown, but mysterious none the less as are most things coming out of this kitchen now a days.

 

As for using non sprouted grains in the leavens, Lucy said she is crazy as any other baking apprentice but she isn’t as stupid as some of them.  This is debatable and isn’t saying all that much anyway when you think about it a second longer than she does.

 

We were going to make this a 100% whole grain affair in keeping with the door stops that Ezekiel actually ate but thought better of it.   We could always do another bake at 100% whole grain if this one doesn't end up breaking rock in a quarry.

 

The leavens ended up being such a huge portion of this bread, we decided not to retard it and risk a possible IED in the fridge.  We are old enough to want to live forever so, tempting fate is not one of our strong suits - even though it seems we we do it all the time with much more dangerous things. 

 

We did our usual 10 minutes of slap and folds even though this dough, if you could call it that, was a sticky, goopy mess that wouldn’t begin to get tame until 5 minutes of being slapped around had passed.  Eventually it came together enough to let rest 15 minutes before 3 sets of S&F’s were done on 20 minute intervals. The left over half of the beans and rice sprouts, as well as, the grain sprouts were incorporated on the first set. 

 

The dough was allowed to ferment for 30 minutes before it being formed into one large chacon using a knotted roll in the middle, surrounded by 8 balls and then one twisted twin sister rope.  The design was then covered by the remaining dough that was shaped in the air into a huge bialy - a near unmanageable thing and I was glad my apprentice had 4 paws to make it into the basket in some decent shape,

 

The basketed dough was placed into a used trash can liner to final proof on the counter for 1 ½ hours before Old Betsy was cranked up to 500 F with top and bottom stones  .  Once the temperature hit 450 F we slipped in the CI skillet full of lava rocks, half full of water, on the bottom rack to create steam and set the timer for 20 minutes to allow the temperature lagging stone to get at least 450 F.

 

When 20 minutes was up, steam was aplenty and we un-molded the chacon onto a peel covered in parchment and slipped the bread into Betsy’s steaming hot maw.  After 2 minutes we turned the temperature down to 450 F.   13 minutes later we removed the steam and turned the temperature down to 400 F, convection this time.

 

We rotated the bread every 5 minutes on the stone for 25 minutes until the bread hit 203 F in the middle.   Then we turned off the heat and let the bread come up to 205 F when it was removed to a cooling rack.

 

The bread took on a handsome, if unusually deep, mahogany color that we have never seen before but like very much.  The crust was very crisp which we also like and it stayed that way as it cooled.   It wasn’t as aromatic as a bread containing aromatic seeds.  Even so, it smelled very earthy.

 

We can’t wait to taste it and see what this unusual ingredient list with beans, rice sprouts and grain sprouts will taste like.   The crust cracked beautifully right where we expected.   The taste wait is over and we have never had a bread that tastes like this.  Deep and rich like a pumpernickel... and with all the beans - Satan's Farts may be closer than you think.  It has its own taste but the taste isn't beans or grain.  My daughter liked it with butter out of the microwave.  I loved it toasted - a whole meal in one bread.  The process was long but the rewards were great.  One of those great meals in a bread.  Perfect as a salad foil.  The crumb was soft and moist but not as open as we thought it would be - not dense and heavy but not as open as we will get it next time.

Next time...... and there will be one, we will omit the YW levain - no need, do an overnight retard, make it 100% whole grain by subbing WW for the AP and get some crunch in there with whole hemp and millet seeds....possibly some dried edamame.  Haven't decided on the dried fruit but apricots come to mind.   It's a lot work for a baker and his apprentice compared to normal bread bakes - but worth it.

There is a  toasted and buttered slice of multi grain Dapumpernickel in the middle of this fine breakfast in order to compare it to the Ezekiel Chacon.  We like the Ezekiel even better and we love the pumpernickel.  Testament to a fine bread and breakfast.

Lunch wasn;lt bad either with a smoked pork, brie and hot pepper jack grilled cheese sandwich, watermelon, strawberry, pickled Thai eggplant, grilled summer squash and eggplant, salad and all the fixin's with home grown tomato, steamed broccoli and yellow squash, half a banana, BBQ baked beans, celery, red pepper and carrot sticks and a half an avocado.  Just yummy!  We like thsi bread very much and the sour has really started to come out on day 2.

Formula

YW, SD & Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Yeast Water

50

30

0

80

12.07%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.02%

Amaranth

10

5

5

20

4.52%

Rye

20

12

12

44

6.64%

Oat

10

12

12

34

5.13%

Kamut

20

12

12

44

9.95%

Farro

20

10

10

40

6.03%

WW

20

18

18

56

8.45%

Buckwheat

20

12

12

44

6.64%

Barley

20

12

12

44

6.64%

Spelt

20

12

12

44

6.64%

Quinoa

10

5

5

20

3.02%

Millet

10

5

5

20

3.02%

Water

100

60

90

250

37.71%

Total

350

205

205

760

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW, SD & Poolish

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

340

51.28%

 

 

 

Water

340

51.28%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

46.88%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

250

37.71%

 

 

 

Mixed Whole Levain Flour

43

6.68%

 

 

 

 Dough Flour

 

44.39% 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.66%

 

 

 

Water

102

15.38%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

34.81%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

663

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

442

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

66.67%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

62.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

69.99%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,621

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

5

0.75%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

5

0.75%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

1.51%

 

 

 

Honey & Molasses

100

15.08%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

20

3.02%

 

 

 

Total

140

21.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

WW

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Buckwheat

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Oat

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Spelt

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Farro

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Rye

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Barley

25

3.77%

 

 

 

White Rice

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Black Rice

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Brown Rice

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Moth Beans

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Mung Beans

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Pigeon Peas

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Black Eyed Peas

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Red Beans

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Black Beans

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Orange Lintels

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Green Lintels

15

2.26%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

365

55.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dry weight for the sprouts.  Wet weight was 500 G

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

With Memorial Day neigh, we needed some hot dog buns for some sausages and brats we will start the weekend off with tonight for dinner.   Who better to come up with a recipe for them than none other than our resident Hot Dog and my German baking Apprentice - Lucy!

 

She got in the mood doing slap and folds for the Japanese Black Rice bread earlier today while singing her favorite Japanese cowboy song -  ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  Yes, it is even truer that she got into this song more doggedly while doing the slap and folds for these buns.  She is incorrigible.

 

 In any event, we made a poolish and YW levain over 12 hours.   After a short 1 hour autolyse, we mixed it all together, did the singing, slapping and folding over 10 minutes and then let the dough rest for 15 minutes before doing the first of 3 sets of S& F’s in the bowl.

 

After a 30 minute rest we shaped the dough into 5 tight little logs a spiral bun and a Franz Joseph roll just in case a hamburger happened onto the gill with the Hot Dogs over the weekend.   After proofing for an hour and a half on parchment paper laid out over a plastic cutting board substituting for a peel, we thought they looked fairly proofed.

 

The oven was already hot from the Japanese Black Rice bread so all we had to do was reconstitute the lava rock and CI skillet steam and get to baking.  The rolls, after egg washing, went in at 400 F for 2 minutes and then 6 minutes at 375 F before removing the steam.  We then turned the oven down to 350 F convection this time and baked the rolls for an additional 12 minutes while rotating them on the stone every 5 minutes,

 

After a total of 20 minutes, the rolls looked nice and brown so out they came to a cooling rack.  We brushed some milk on them to make sure that they crust would be soft as possible.   They puffed up beautifully in the oven and the Toadies really come through in the smell department.  Lucy can’t wait to eat these buns with a nice variety of sausages for dinner.  Will post a crumb shot then.

 

The nuns were very good and they worked out well even if a little on the large side - just more room for pickled, onions, cucumber and Hatch chilis.

Happy Memorial Weekend!

Love the left over toasted buns much better when steamed for lunch the next day!

Formula

YW & Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Yeast Water

85

0

0

85

17.00%

Pinch of yeast

0

0

0

0

0.00%

AP

130

50

50

230

46.00%

Water

50

50

0

100

20.00%

Total

265

100

50

415

83.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW & Poolish

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

230

46.00%

 

 

 

Water

185

37.00%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

0

42.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

270

54.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

270

54.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

 

 

 

Water

81

16.20%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

30.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

266

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

53.20%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

2.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

65.57%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

982

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Egg

47

9.40%

 

 

 

Butter

42

8.40%

 

 

 

Non Fat Dry Milk Powder

25

5.00%

 

 

 

Cream Cheese

50

10.00%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.00%

 

 

 

Honey

20

4.00%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.00%

 

 

 

Total

207

41.40%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After Evon’s post of her bread with Japanese Black Rice in it, we knew it had to get to the top pf the bake list like Hanseata’s Wild Rice bread did when it appeared.  We had run across some of this rice a couple of months ago at Sprouts and had cooked it for dinner.  We knew it would end up in bread eventually and Evon’s post was the impetus.

 

The question was what kind of bread to put it in?  My apprentice went back and looked at our take of the Karin’s wonderful Wild Rice Bread and quickly knew that we would do something similar to it, perhaps not as dark or complicated.

 

Since I started medicating my apprentice with Sylvia’s Dog Bones, she isn’t as determined or anal as usual - even though she has taken to licking the glow in the dark, black light intensified picture we have of Elvis performing in Las Vagas.   Here was that bake:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28806/hanseata%E2%80%99s-wild-rice-sd-w-yeast-water-multi-seeds-prunes-beer-and-sprouts

Here is Karin’s original post :

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24092/wild-rice-sourdough-bread-ended-cold-war

Here is Evon’s inspirational bake, if a little dark, : Sprouted Organic Wild Black Rice SD Bread

 

It isn’t often we have a new bread ingredient like Japanese Wild Rice but Evon’s bread also had edamame in it – a second ingredient we have never seen used in bread before.  And as luck would have it, we had 3 kinds of edamame in the pantry and freezer.  We had fresh shelled edamame in the freezer. Wasabi dried edamame (my favorite after a few beers) and regular dried edamame.

 

You can tell we eat it a lot around here since it is my daughter’s favorite veggie.  We decided to be our normal conservative self when it comes to baking, as opposed to my apprentice’s solution for cleaning tile grout or magnesium rims on fine, if old, motorcycles.  So, we went with the non Wasabi dried edamame even though the black rice is Japanese.  You just can’t make apprentice’s think after leading them to water.

 

We sprouted the black rice and thought we had killed it when we forgot it was soaking and let it go for 8 hours before draining and putting them between damp paper towels.   But the rice loved it and after 2 days had sprouted well.  My apprentice was especially thrilled since this was her first time sprouting any kind of rice.

 

We did the standard (3) 4 hour levain build by putting all of the whole multi-grains in the levain.  Since it was white flour in the dough, we autolysed it for 1 hour only with the VWG, Toadies, red and white malts.  Once the levain and autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds.

My apprentice sang one of her favorite tunes while doing the S& F’s - an Oriental cowboy song called - ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  I reminded her that we wouldn’t be making hot dog buns till later in the day but she was in the groove and just wouldn’t be stopped with her being a hot dog and Japanese rice in the mix.  I’m guessing it won’t be the last time I hear this odd tune today.

 

After a 15 minute rest we did 3 sets of S& F’s on 15 minute intervals and added the edamame, black rice sprouts, ground non aromatic and aromatic seed variety and prunes on the first set.  By the 3rd set they were well distributed.  After another 15 minute rest, we divided the dough in half, shaped each and placed them into rice floured baskets and then into used plastic trash can liners.

 

After a 30 minute rest on the counter the baskets were placed into the fridge for an 18 hour retard.  By the next morning they had risen well in the fridge.  They came out of the cold for one hours to warm up before we fired up Big Old Betsy with Sylvia’s and David’s Patented Steaming Combo.

 

It took 45 minutes for the oven to get to 500 F including the 20 minutes for the top and bottom stones to get to that temperature lagging 20 minute behind.  We really cut back on the rice flour this time and worried that the dough would stick to the baskets but they came out no worries after a rap on the parchment covered peel.  A quick slash and into the oven they went.

 

After 2 minutes of steam at 500 F we turned the oven down to 465 F for a further 10 minutes of steam.  After removing the steam, we turned the oven down to 450 F, convection this time and let the bread finish baking to 205 F on the inside while rotating the bread ever 5 minute on the stone.  Total baking time was 27 minutes with 15 of it without steam.

 

It browned up, bloomed out had a few blisters and an ear where we tried to get one.  I like the color of this bread and the pattern that the baskets put on them.  They smell like they will be tasty if not delicious.  Have to wait for the crumb shot till after lunch .

The crumb is soft, light, open and moist.  The taste is totally unique and unlike Hanseata's Wild Rice bread.   We really like this bread.  the dried edamame will be a routine bread ingrediant from now on - we love the mouth feel and taste of them in thsi bread very much.   We love rhe contrasting ncolors and textures of teh crumb - very appealing!  It is another fine bread of late and a shout out goes to Evon for her inspiration and fine post of her bread.  One more crumb picture for Lucy!

Formula

Whole Wheat and Rye Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW and Rye Sour Starter

20

0

0

20

3.17%

Whole Wheat

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Spelt

0

15

15

30

4.76%

Rye

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Water

30

45

20

95

15.08%

Total

80

90

65

235

37.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

20.63%

 

 

 

Water

105

16.67%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

500

79.37%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

79.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.75%

 

 

 

Water

382

60.63%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

630.0

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

487

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.30%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

25.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.90%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

3.17%

 

 

 

Prunes

72

11.43%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

Dried Edamame

35

5.56%

 

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax Seeds

12

1.90%

 

 

 

Poppy Seeds

3

0.48%

 

 

 

Anise, Coriander, Caraway & Fennel

12

1.90%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Total

172

27.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Japanese Back Rice

100

15.87%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

100

15.87%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight for Japanese Black Rice is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I found a WW levain lurking in the back of the fridge.  It had been there for at least a week and maybe two.  It was a 100% hydration one since the hooch had separated out and was lying on top.  We poured off the liquid and fed it twice with multigrain flour and water on 4 hour intervals and it doubled in 2 hours after the last feeding.  So what to do with it?

  

WW Sourdough                                                                       White Yeast Water - love those toadie specks

We had our monthly hamburger night coming up and were without the required buns again.  After doing our normal whole grains in the SD levain we used AP flour for the rest of the mix.  After a 2 hour autolyse using milk, we mixed the levain with the wet flours.  To enriched the dough we added butter, egg and honey.

  

Since we have no idea what the pedigree is for the 10% protein, AP flour in the Winco bins, we added some VWG to ensure decent gluten structure.  The hydration came in at 81% which was pretty high for a 35% whole grain bread.  After 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F on 20 minute intervals the dough went into the fridge for an overnight retard.

 

When putting the SD in the fridge I noticed that the YW had gone unused for a while and probably needed refreshment but would wait on that till the morning.  First thing in the morning I got out the YW and mixed up an enriched white dough similar to the SD but added ricotta cheese and the only whole grains were the Toadies.

 

No levain build, no autolyse and no retard required.  It felt much wetter than the 74% hydration it calculates to.  Still, this too is very wet for something that is supposed to be a shaped, rope roll of some kind.   So if you want more coil definition, use less liquid for both of these dough preparations.

 

We just tossed everything together, did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 minute intervals and then left the dough on the counter to ferment for 2 hours,  At the end of 2 hours we retrieved the SD out of the fridge to let it warm up for and hour.   This is when Lucy sort of went berserko with her wild, hair brained ideas that she is known for executing poorly if at all.

 

She thought it would be cool to make Franz Joseph rolls by making ropes out of the 2 varieties of dough and then twist 1 of each kind together to make a 145 g  twisted rope.  This twisted, half step sister rope could then be shaped  into Franz Joseph rolls, which are the same as Kaiser rolls but named properly from a historical point of view.

 

We didn’t need or want 12 buns, so we took half of each  dough and used that to make a 6 strand round challah since these mixes sure looked and smelled like challah to me… only way more wet.

 

It was a bad choice since the dough was too wet and should have been in a loaf pan instead.  Always listen to Mini Oven when she says, (paraphrased) something like, ‘if its not ciabatta and over 80% hydration, it belongs in a tin! 

I couldn’t remember what temperature to bake enriched dough at so looked at the beet infused buns and saw 350 F.  Since I know my oven is 25 F low, I baked at 375 F with steaming lava rocks in a CI skillet. I put the egg washed challah on the top stone 4 minute before the egg washed and sesame seeded rolls went on the bottom stone.  After 8 more minutes out came the steam and on went the convection at 350 F this time.

We rotated the bread and rolls every 5 minutes on the stones and at the 25 total  minute mark the rolls looked done and out they came to cooling racks without testing for temperature.  8 minutes later the challah hit 202 F.  We turned off the oven and then when the challah hit 205 F we removed it from the off oven.

  

Everything browned nicely, no blisters were expected since you can’t get them at 375 F no matter how much steam you have.  We sliced open the challah and found that the SD portion was more open than the YW one and it looked like the YW portion was way under proofed compared to our normal crumb but the bread.

We should havelet the YW ferment for at least 2 hours more on the counter, 4 total or more hours before getting out the SD from its retard.  The cool part was the slightly darker SD portion that has tang.  Gives a unique looke to the bread. Not as dramatic a contrast as the Chaccon for Eric by far, but it is s subtle thing you can’t help but notice and taste.

Would expect the same thing for the rolls but won’t know till dinner time.  The rolls were much like the Challah on the inside adn made the perfect vehicle for the high rise hamburger where my architectural training was needed!  These burgers were 6 oz with soy sauce, garlic and onion powder, salt and pepper seasoning.  The toppings were BBQ sauce and ketchup,  grilled and caramelized onions, mushrooms, red yellow, green and Hatch peppers, apple wood smoked bacon, smoked Gouda and brie cheeses, home grown; tomato and lettuces. The sides were sweet and white rose baked potato wedges and a nice salad. When you only have ham,burgers once a month you have to go all out.  The buns held up exceptionally well structurally and their grilling really made them tasty. 

Multigrain SD Hamburger Buns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Wheat Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

4.12%

Rye

0

0

25

25

5.15%

WW

50

60

0

110

22.68%

Spelt

0

0

25

25

5.15%

Water

50

45

40

135

27.84%

Total

50

45

65

315

64.95%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

170

35.05%

 

 

 

Water

145

29.90%

 

 

 

Hydration

85.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

32.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

315

64.95%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

315

64.95%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.65%

 

 

 

Milk

203

41.86%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

64.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

485

100.00%

 

 

 

Milk and Water

348

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

71.75%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

35.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

81.70%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Egg

50

10.31%

 

 

 

Butter

57

11.75%

 

 

 

Honey

15

3.09%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.06%

 

 

 

Total

132

27.22%

 

 

 

 

YW White Hamburger Buns

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water

100

27.40%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

AP

365

100.00%

Dough Flour

365

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.92%

Water

115

31.51%

Dough Hydration

31.51%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

365

100.00%

Water

215

 

T. Dough Hydration

58.90%

 

Whole Grain %

4.11%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.10%

 

Total Weight

769

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Egg

45

12.33%

Butter

45

12.33%

Ricotta Cheese

60

16.44%

White Rye Malt

3

0.82%

Toadies

12

3.29%

Honey

10

2.74%

VW Gluten

7

1.92%

Total

182

49.86%

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

With our daughter coming home tonight we thought home made pizza was in order since she loves it more than taking final exams at college.  We had built a YW levain for it on Monday and stuck it in the fridge to chill till this morning. To give it a boost we also made a 120 g, 100% hydration poolish this morning.  Both were ready to go to work in 4 hours of warm up and ferment

 

This was an all white flour affair which we have not done in years. No autolyse, 10 minutes of slap and folds, 3 sets of SF’s 20 minutes apart where the minced; fresh rosemary, clove of garlic and sun dried tomato were incorporated on the first fold.

There was the 30 minutes of counter ferment and then into the fridge for 3 hours to develop.  We took the dough out 2 hours before we formed it into 3 pizzas and one batch of Parmesan and Pecorino cheese, herb and Mojo de Ajo twisted bread sticks.

 

Docked and brushed with Mojo de Ajo before par baking

Pizza topping included hot Italian sausage, pepperoni, 3 fresh peppers; jalapeno, Hatch Green and  red bell, 3 cheeses; Mozzarella, Pecorino and Parmesan, caramelized, mushrooms and onions with a garnish of green onion and fresh basil flowers.

 

We par baked the crust for 3 minutes at 500 F between 2 stones top and bottom and loaded the crust up and finished them off in another 5 minutes.  The crust wa super thin and crisp – just the way we like it.

 

Very thin and crsip crust - no bending allowed even when piled high with toppings.

The bread sticks happened when we ran out of pizza toppings besides the cheeses.  My daughter sliced the last already rolled out pizza crust into strips with the pizza cutter.   She then brushed on the garlic infused olive oil, put the grated Parmesan and Pecorino cheese on and then the fresh basil flowers.

 

Pizza #2

She folded the strips in half to enclose the goodies and then twisted them to make them prettier than normal.  Baked these at 400 F right on the stone and then dipped them I pizza sauce to really top them off – delicious.

 

Pizza #3 and some bread sticks.

My daughter said the crust was good but only middle of the road in all of our crust efforts over the years - likely due to not being retarded overnight.  It was easily pliable yet strong enough to work with, easy to roll out very thin without tearing even one hole.   All in all, a good treat on a Friday night.

 

And a salad.

Formula

Yeast Water and Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Pinch of ADY

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Yeast Water

50

0

0

50

8.20%

AP

110

50

50

210

0

Water

60

50

30

140

0

Total

170

100

80

400

19.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

235

38.52%

 

 

 

Water

190

31.15%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.85%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

36.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

375

61.48%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

375

61.48%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.64%

 

 

 

Water

250

40.98%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

66.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

610

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

440

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

72.13%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.18%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Olive Oil

15

2.46%

 

 

 

Honey

15

2.46%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.64%

 

 

 

Total

40

6.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I T of chopped fresh rosemary, 1 clove of minced garlic and 2 T of

 

 

sun dried tomato was the fold in at the first S&F.

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We were out of white bread again and with Lucy in the middle of her rye bread experiments, it didn’t look like we would get a chance to make one either.  But we built the rye levain for her and at the same time a whole wheat one for this bread and a YW one for some possible pizza - possibly tomorrow or Sunday.  Saturday is out since we are off to Tucson to finish moving my daughter back home.

 

This levain build was 3 stages, 4 hours each, levain build like the last one with the exception that, instead of an overnight 12 hour retard of the levain after the 3rd feeding, this one had a 36 hour retard after the 3rd feeding.  It was allowed to come to room temperature for 2 hours when it more than doubled.

 

That same 2 hours was used for the autolyse of the dry ingredients with the exception of the seeds and sprouts.  The liquid was the reserved soaking water from the sprouts for this bake and the soaking water from last one with some honey.

 

The dry included toadies, WW, Spelt, oats, corn, red and white malts, a small; amount of VWG, and some medium ground white and black sesame seeds with some golden and  brown flax seeds.

 

Once the autolyse was mixed with the small amount of levain, we did 10 minutes of slap and folds where the gluten developed very well.  We then did 3 sets of S&F’s where the remaining hemp, black, white and brown poppy seeds and the WW sprouts were incorporated on the first stretch and fold.

 

Once the S&F’s were completed we let the dough rest for 30 minutes before shaping it and placing it in a rice floured basket and then immediately retarding it for 15 hours.  The dough had doubled during the retard so when we pulled it out of the fridge in the morning we then fired up old Betsy to 500 F to bake the bread as soon as possible.

 

We used our usual Sylvia’s steaming pyrex pan with two towels and David’s, lava rock filled, CI 12” skillet both half full of water for the mega steam which was placed on the bottom rack when the temperature hot 425 F.  When Betsy beeped she was at 500F we set the timer for 15 minutes to allow the top and bottom stones to get to the 500 F and get the steam billowing.

 

We un-molded the bread from the basket, gently since it was an inch over the rim, and over turned it onto parchment paper on a peel.  We quickly scored it and placed it on the bottom stone and steamed it at 470 F for 15 minutes before removing the steam and turning the oven down to 435 F, convection this time.

 

The bread was rotated 90 degrees on the stone every 5 minutes to ensure even browning.   20 minutes after the steaming scheme came out of the oven, the bread was at 200 F.  We turned the oven off and left the bread on the stone with the door closed.  When the bread hit 205 F 5 minutes later, we opened the door and allowed the crust to further crisp on the stone till it hit 207 F.

 

Total baking time to 205 F was 40 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for the bread to crisp on the stone from 205 F to 207 F.  The crust was blistered with small hole, boldly baked to a mahogany color and quite crisp.  The crust went soft as it cooled.  We will have to wait for the crumb shots when we slice this bread for lunch.

 

The crumb is soft, moist and flavorful with a very nice nutty background and seedy crunch of the hemp and poppy seeds  This is another bread we like very much.  It may not look as delicious as it really is but that is because it is subtle and not to be taste bud trusted.  It grows on you .... and we will let it do so :-)   It is a welcomed treat to have so many good bakes of late and then have the baker at Sprouts give me a decent SFSD too!  Don't say anything but my apprentices breads are way better than Sprouts  but I am glad Sprouts is selling something decent for very little hard earned cash.  I saw a very small selection of  bread at Whole Foods that is baked in a small bakery in Coolidge . AZ.  I'm going to take a bike ride there and see what that bakery is all about.  Their bread looked very good on the outside and baked in a WFO!

Formula

Whole Wheat Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW  SD Starter

15

0

0

15

2.39%

Whole Wheat

30

30

30

90

14.34%

Water

30

30

0

60

9.56%

Total

75

60

30

165

26.33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

98

15.54%

 

 

 

Water

67.5

10.76%

 

 

 

Hydration

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

12.62%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Spelt

60

9.56%

 

 

 

Whole Oat

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Coarse Yellow Corn Grits

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

60

9.56%

 

 

 

AP

380

60.56%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

530

84.46%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

415

66.14%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

78.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

627.5

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water and Water

482.5

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.89%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

40.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.41%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,309

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.32%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.32%

 

 

 

Honey

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Medium Ground Sesame & Flax Seeds

30

4.78%

 

 

 

White, Brown & Black Poppy Seeds

15

2.39%

 

 

 

Hemp Seeds

15

2.39%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

0.80%

 

 

 

Total

89

14.18%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat Berries

100

15.94%

 

 

 

Total Flour Soaker

100

15.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight for whole wheat sprouted berries is the dry weight.

 

 

 

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