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dabrownman

Continuing our experiment with 1% SD seed and long counter top ferment and proofing we tried out several new ideas with this bake.  The average kitchen temperature over the 24 hours was 77 F degrees.

 

First we upped the whole grains to 17.5% to try to improve the flavor and sour further and we changed to prunes and brazil nuts, one of Andy’s favorite combination that we like very much, while keeping the pumpkin and sunflower seeds.  We added a bulgar scald to improve the flavor and texture of the bread and also upped the hydration slightly to compensate for the slightly more whole grains.

 

We combined and mixed everything except the nuts, fruits, seeds and bulgar scald and let it autolyse for 30 minutes.  Then we did 13 minutes of French Slap and folds before adding in the rest of the ingredients and doing another 2minutes if slap and folds to incorporate the add ins.

  

The dough was then left on the counter top for 21 hours to ferment and develop.  We learned from out last bake that 20 hours was better with another 4 hours on the counter after shaping to proof.  But we didn’t get up in time so we have what we have – just like always - no worries.

 

We shaped and panned this bread as a loaf this time with a few seeds on top and let it proof for 4 hours on the counter before going into the 450 F oven with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans to steam for 12 minutes.  At the 12 minute mark the steam was removed and the oven was turned down to 425 F, convection this time.

 

It baked for another 10 minutes after being turned 180 degrees after 5 minutes and removed from the pan.  When it registered 205 F we turned the oven off and let the loaf crisp for 10 minutes before being removed from the oven to the cooling rack. This bread tastes as amazingly sour as the fig and pistachio bread did but it has a deeper flavor thanks to the bulgar scald and the extra whole grains.  The crust was so crunchy and stayed that way even after it cooled - very nice.  The crumb is  not as open as the previous bake but it is just as soft and moist.   We also like the extra seeds with the fruit and nuts too.  Much better bread all the way around.

 

Formula

  

Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

6

1.15%

Total Starter

6

1.15%

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

Hydration

66.67%

 

Levain % of Total

0.55%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole Wheat

20

3.85%

Whole spelt

15

2.88%

Dark Rye

15

2.88%

Whole Wheat

15

2.88%

AP

440

84.62%

Dough Flour

520

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.73%

Water

385

74.04%

Dough Hydration

74.04%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

523.6

 

Total Water

387.4

 

T. Dough Hydration

73.99%

 

Whole Grain %

17.57%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.74%

 

Total Weight

1,095

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Multi-grain Malt

3

0.58%

VW Gluten

3

0.58%

White Multi-grain Malt

3

0.58%

Total

9

1.73%

 

 

 

Add Ins - Nuts Fruits and Seeds

%

Brazil Nuts

50

9.62%

Sunflower 20, Pumpkin 20

40

7.69%

Prunes

50

9.62%

Total

140

26.92%

 

 

 

Scald

 

 

Whole Bulgar

20

3.85%

Total Scald

20

3.85%

 

 

 

SFSD Total Weight

1,095

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We decided to take our 1% SD starter experiment to the dark side by using much more whole grains; mainly rye and add some yeast water into the mix to try to open the crumb.  Our previous YW experiments show that YW can open the crumb dramatically more than what SD seed can do on its own when it comes to high percent whole grain breads.

 

With Thanksgiving less than 2 weeks away we decided to make a small cocktail loaf of rye bread flavored with cocoa, coffee and caraway.  To bolster the flavor and texture of the medium rye bread further we added some scalded rye chops to the 82.5 % hydration mix.

 

Like Phil says - When it cracks it is ready to go in the oven.  In this case the bran flakes worked perfectly. 

We have no experience to go on using low amounts of SD and YW seeds and long counter top fermentation when using higher amounts of home milled grains.  So we made a wild guess at how long the process should take.  We decided to knock 5 hours off the total 24 hour time and to not add the 5 g YW to the mix until 5 hours after the fermentation started.

It was ready to pan up in 16 hours and it proofed, nearly doubling and cracking the bran sprinkled on top in 4 hours  We baked it with 2 of Sylvia's steaming cups in the mini oven at 450 F for 15 minute. The steam was removed and the temperature was turned down to 350 F and baked for another 10 minutes before being de-panned and baked for another 5 minutes after turning the bread 180 degrees on the oven rack. 

It was left in the off oven, door ajar for 10 minutes to continue to crisp the crust and then removed to he cooling rack.  From the outside the loaf has potential.  It smells beautiful and is quite attractive for a brown lump of a bread covered in bran.  We hope that the crumb is as open as the last rye bake that was 100% whole rye.  We await 24 hours to see if the yeast water worked its magic once again.

24 hours later and this bread turned out open, moist 1/4"slicing is no problem and best of all just plain delicious.  You don't taste the coffee and cocoa and even the caraway is subtle.  It is lovely plain, toasted, buttered and a nice coctail bread for the Holidays.

Formula 

Combo Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

3

1.19%

Yeast Water

5

2.00%

Total Starter

8

3.20%

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

Hydration

344.44%

 

Levain % of Total

1.58%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole spelt

25

10.00%

Dark Rye

100

40.00%

Whole Wheat

25

10.00%

AP

100

40.00%

Dough Flour

250

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

5

2.00%

Water

200

80.00%

Dough Hydration

80.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

251.8

 

Total Water

206.2

 

T. Dough Hydration

81.89%

 

Whole Grain %

61.76%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

82.56%

 

Total Weight

505

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Multi-grain Malt

2

0.80%

Barley Malt

10

4.00%

White Multi-grain Malt

2

0.80%

Total

14

5.60%

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

Rye Chops

20

8.00%

 

 

 

1 tsp Caraway Seeds

 

 

1 tsp Instant Coffee

 

 

1 tsp of Cocoa

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

To see the beginning of this bake go to the following link and go down below *********************************

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/30755/sd-starter-experiment-how-long-can-it-ferment-counter-goo-overtakes-it

This is about as fool proof, something we need around here, SD bread imaginable that only takes 7 g of starter and 24 hours of basically doing nothing.  No retard, no levain building, no refrigerator required.

 

Just take7g of starter, mix it with 66 g of whole grains, I used equal amounts of spelt, rye and ww.  Add 2g each of red and white malts made from the same grains, 315 g each of AP and bread flour with 72% hydration (505) g of water.  Once mixed let it sit for 30 minutes to autolyse, add 11 g of salt and do 15 minutes of French slap and folds. Once done let it sit in a plastic covered oiled bowl on the counter for 20 hours until it doubles.

 

The split it in half and shape one into a SFSD boule  to see how tasty and sour this bread is and make the other one into what ever you want.  I put (2) kinds of figs, some pistachio nuts and some sunflower and pumpkin seeds in the mix and shaped it into an oval SD seeded Fig and Pistachio boule.

  

In 4 hours they both went into the 450 F oven with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming loaf pand and baling stone

  

 I had thrown some of the seeds into the bottom of the oval basket before the dough went in so when the seeded bread was un- molded I slashed 2 crescent moon shapes on the top where the seeds stopped, about 1/3 the way down from the top.  I cut a triangle on the top of the none seeded boule

  

They steamed for 12 minutes and then the steam was removed, the oven was turned down to 425 F convection and the breads baked together for another 10 minutes.  Each was rotated 180 degrees on the stone after 5 minutes. 

 

At the 22 total minute mark each bread read 208 F and my apprentice deemed them done with a wag of her tail.   We left them on the stone for another 10 minutes with oven off and the door ajar

 

Both of the boules baled up nicely brown without incident.  Spring was good, the plain SFSD was well blistered and the seeded bred much less so.  The crumb was more open on the plain SFSD as expected but the seeded bread was airy.  Both were glossy on the inside with the plain one more so.   Both were moist but the seeded fig bread even more moist.

  

Both were nicely sour and we expect them to get more pucker going by tomorrow.  If I had to pick my favorite of the two, I would go for the fig bread this time.  It may not be as easy as no-knead but if you are looking for an easy way to make decent SDSF this is it.

 

Formula

 

Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

7

1.00%

Water

0

0.00%

Total Starter

7

1.01%

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

Hydration

66.67%

 

Levain % of Total

0.57%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Bread Flour

315

45.26%

Whole spelt

22

3.16%

Dark Rye

22

3.16%

Whole Wheat

22

3.16%

AP

315

45.26%

Dough Flour

696

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

12

1.72%

Water

505

72.56%

Dough Hydration

72.56%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

700.2

 

Water

507.8

 

T. Dough Hydration

72.52%

 

Whole Grain %

10.50%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.11%

 

Total Weight

1,231

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Rye Malt

2

0.29%

White Rye Malt

2

0.29%

Total

4

0.57%

 

 

 

Add Ins for Half of the Dough

 

 

Pistachios

20

 

Sunflower 10, Pumpkin 10

20

 

Mission and Adriatic Figs

50

 

Total

90

 

 

 

 

SFSD Total Weight

615.5

 

Fig, Nut & Seeded Weight

705.5

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We were out of red and white rye malt when we made out last batch of SD multi-grain bagels with sprouts.  Since our multi-grain bakes that we like the best have been a combination of spelt, rye and whole wheat we decided to make a batch of red and white  multi-grain malt using these 3 grains.

First soak the berries in water for 3 hours and then sprout them for 3-4 days between two layers of damp kitchen towels covered in plastic.  I re-dampen the towels ever 24 hours so they don't dry out.  When they look like this:

Then dry them in the oven on a rimmed cookie sheet.  Start out at 150 F, no higher in order to make diastatic white malt.  Any higher temperature and you will kill the enzymes you just made by malting.  Once dry,  about an hour or so,  take half the berries and grind them into white malt. 

Take the other half of the berries and continue to bake them starting at 200 F and raising the temperature 25 F every 5 minutes until you get to 350 F.  Watch them carefully so they don't burn.  Grind them into red non diastatic malt when they are cool.  Red malt adds flavor and color to any bread.  You should get red and white malts that looks like this:

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We made another batch of our YW / SD bagels trying to work out the kinks with a few minor changes starting with 26% whole grains.  Instead of a 20 hour retard, we retarded the shaped bagels for 15 hours.  The whole grains this time were spelt, rye and whole wheat in stead of just WW.

  

Another change we made was to use the excess sprout soaking water and yogurt whey along with water for the liquid in the dough. 

  

We also added some sprouts, 5%, to these bagels utilizing spelt, rye and whole wheat berries that were soaked for 3 hours and sprouted between damp paper towels under plastic wrap for 2 days. We did not use any white rye malt since we were out.

 

To see the modified Stan Ginsberg Favorite Bagel methods,  go to here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29681/15-whole-wheat-bagels-yw-and-sd-desem-combo-starter

 

This batch did not rise as much in the oven, bake up as brown or have as many blisters as the last batch but the crumb was more open and they tasted better.  Don’t know why since this batch was baked in the mini oven too because of its ability to blister anything to death.

 

We tried one new seed combination this time adding oregano seeds to the basil seeds we like so much.  Oregano seeds need to be treated like coriander – use sparingly.

 

The additional seed types we used were white and black poppy seeds, white and black sesame seeds and on the combo bagel we added nigella seeds and salt with all the rest of the seeds.

 

We have baked lots of bagels and think these taste the best but the 15% whole grain ones looked the best.  As usual, these bagels were best toasted with cream cheese but they were not bad with butter and jam too.

 

A schmear on one side                                                                             Butter on the other ----Just Yummy!

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

20

2.41%

Whole Wheat

30

4.48%

Dark Rye

30

4.48%

Water

60

8.96%

Total Starter

140

22.39%

 

 

 

YW Starter

Build 1

%

Yeast Water

80

11.94%

WW

40

5.97%

Dark Rye

40

5.97%

Total

160

23.88%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Bread Flour

245

36.57%

Whole spelt

20

2.99%

Dark Rye

20

2.99%

Whole Wheat

20

2.99%

Insant Potato Flakes

10

1.49%

AP

350

52.24%

Dough Flour

670

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

13

1.94%

Sp. water 120, whey 50, water 150

320

47.76%

Dough Hydration

47.76%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

830

 

Water

470

 

T. Dough Hydration

56.63%

 

Whole Grain %

26.51%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

57.95%

 

Total Weight

1,369

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Barley Malt

22

3.28%

Total

22

3.28%

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

WW

12

1.79%

Spelt

12

1.79%

Rye

12

1.79%

Total Sprouts

36

5.37%

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Here is week #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

It's already been two weeks since the last Parade of Sandwiches and fall is here.  Yes, it is still in the 80's but it feels wonderful after 5 months of the AZ heat.  Fall flowers are starting to bloom again. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We had two experiments going on at the same time and thought we would kill two birds with one stone by combining them sort of like a YW SD combo starter.

  

 

Our 1 gram SD 36 hour before retard levain build went well and we split it in two to make a white flour one and a whole grain one here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/30755/sd-starter-experiment-how-long-can-it-ferment-counter-goo-overtakes-it

  

 

We also had our 15% whole grain SD project that we wanted to increase up to 40% whole grains too.  So we used the whole grain levain(after a 24 hour retard in the fridge making it a 60 hour build) to make a 40% whole grain SD bread using spelt, rye and WW.  To make things interesting and even more tasty we included a bulgar and flax seed scald to round out the flavor

  

 

With the white flour 60 hour levain we made another 15% whole grain SD but also perked it up some with pumpkin, sunflower, chia and hemp seeds inside and out.

  

 

We decided to bake both in Chacon shapes and also in Dutch Ovens.  The white seeded Chacon was made with one central knotted roll surrounded by a non twist rope and covered with a huge bialy shaped main dough.  Hydration was 75,5%.

   

 

The flours and water were autolysed with the salt for 3 hours for both breads.  Each started out with 10 minutes of French Slap an Folds followed by a 30 minute rest in a plastic covered, oiled bowl.  Then 3 sets of stretch and folds we done every 30 minutes with the add ins being incorporated on the 2nd set.

 

 

Once the S& F’s were completed each dough was allowed to ferment for 1 hour before being shaped into Chacons in the rice floured baskets.  They were immediately placed into sealed trash can liners and placed in the fridge for a 12 hour retard.

 

 

The 40% whole grain Chacon was nearly fully proofed during the retard but the white one was only half way there.  So well pulled the white one out of the fridge, leaving it in the bag to warm up and proof an hour and half at room temp before we took out the 40% whole grain Chacon.

 

Both were baked at 450 F for 15 minutes to steam with the lid on starting the 40% whole grain Chacon 15 minutes before the white one went in.  After the lids were removed they were allowed to continue to bake in the DO for 5 minutes before being removed from the DO and allowed to finish baking on the stone.

 

Both were deemed done at the 25 minute mark when they read 209 F in the middle.  They were removed to the cooling rack immediately and allowed to cool for 1 ½ hours before slicing into quarters and slicing 1 quarter into ½”slices.

The seeded white Chacon browned a little more on the outside and also had a slightly more open crumb – but not much.  Both crusts went soft as they cooled and were chewy. The crumbs were soft, airy and moist with a little gloss.

For once my wife agreed.  The 40% whole grain variant tasted noticeably better to each of us and was our favorite even thought the seeded white Chacon was a fine and dandy SD bread.  Both were noticeably more sour tangy than our standard SD breads made with a normal 6 hour build and a 24 hour retard of the levain.

When ever we have 60 hours to kill and only 1 g of SD starter we now know what to do with it to make some nice SD bread.

40% Whole Grain SD with Scald Formula   

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

1

0

0

1

0.19%

Spelt

0

15

0

15

3.95%

Whole Wheat

0

29

0

29

7.63%

Dark Rye

0

44

0

44

11.58%

AP

50

0

0

50

13.16%

Water

37.5

45

10

92.5

24.34%

Total Starter

88.5

133

10

230.5

60.66%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

67.15%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

23.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

130

34.21%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

40

10.53%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

40

10.53%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

40

10.53%

 

 

 

AP

130

34.21%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

380

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.11%

 

 

 

Water

325

85.53%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

85.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

518.5

 

 

 

 

Total Water

418

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

80.62%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

40.21%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

80.62%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

Flax Seed

20

5.26%

 

 

 

Bulgar

38

10.00%

 

 

 

Total Scald

58

15.26%

 

 

 

 

15% Whole Grain Seeded SD Formula

Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

1

0

0

1

0.26%

AP

50

88

0

138

36.22%

Water

37.5

45

10

92.5

24.28%

Total

88.5

133

10

231.5

60.76%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Starter

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

67.15%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

23.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

150

39.37%

 

 

 

Whole spelt

27

7.09%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

27

7.09%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

27

7.09%

 

 

 

AP

150

39.37%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

381

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.10%

 

 

 

Water

300

78.74%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

78.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

519.5

 

 

 

 

Total Water

393

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.65%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

15.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.65%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Chia  15, Hemp 15

30

7.87%

 

 

 

Pumpkin 25, Sunflower 25

50

13.12%

 

 

 

Total

80

21.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional 30 g of Sunflower and Pumpkin

 

 

 

Seeds Used as Topping Not Included

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Go to the bottom of the post to see the extension after the ************************************************

It sounds like an interesting experiment to do for SD starter. I can use up to 20g of stater making 200 g of 80% hydration levain over 12 hours in the winter time and kitchen temperatures around 60-65 F. That 200 g levain would normally go into 800 g of flour and 600 g of water and then developed over a couple of hours. In the winter time it could possibly ferment and proof 6-8 hours on the counter before needing to go in the oven.  With yeast water we have gone 12 hours.

 I suppose that if one would use 1 g of SD starter and mix it with the entire 900 g of flour and 675 g of water and 2% salt (no levain build) it would take a while for it to be ready to bake, How long we will have to find out - unless someone has already done this test. I'm not sure, perhaps someone here knows this too, but yeast only lives about 6 days or so before croaking.

No collapse after 24 hours,

So my apprentice took 1 g of starter and tried it out on 100 g of flour and 75 g of water, 2 g of salt to see what happens. She started at 9 AM, Oct 26, 68.2 F kitchen temp and level marked with a rubber band. Lets see how long it takes to double and make a couple knotted rolls out of it :-) Here is a pix exactly 24 hours later the levain had nearly tripled but had not collapsed. Amazing for 1 g of starter and 100 g of flour.

 

9 AM - Oct 26                                                                                      9 AM - Oct 27. 

Here is a picture of the top of the levain too. I've decided to eventually make some bagels out of some of this and a lower hydration will slow this train down some too. Also want to get some whole grains in the mix too. So we will divide the dough in half and add another 86 g of flour, 44 g of water to get the hydration down to 60% from 75% and a little less than 2 g of salt to each half.  One half got 86 g of whole grain flours (50%rye, 32% WW and 18% spelt).  The other half got 86 g of AP and 44 g of water and less than 2 g of salt - to keep the control of white flour intact.

10 AM - Oct 27 after the 24 hour mark split into two levains one has some Whole Grains now and one is still AP only.

This should perhaps get us from 24 to 48 hours on the counter. The temperature fell to 70 F this morning from a high yesterday of 81 F in the afternoon fall kitchen.

The whole grain levain on the left doubled again at the 32 hour mark and was put in the fridge for a 24 hour retard and the white flour levain doubled at the 36 hour mark and also went into the fridge for a 24 hour retard.  Looks like 36 hours is as far as we would want to go before refrigerating or using.  Retarding the starter should make the sour really come out.

************************************************************************************************************************

Now that we know it takes 24 hours for our 1g of our Desem /Rye SD starter  tpo double 100g of flour at 75% hydration, we are going to extend the experiment to see if we can do a 36 hour bread on the counter top.

We mixed 7 g of 67% hydro starter with 50 g of water to thin it out and liquefy it.  We then added 22 g each of home ground whole: spelt,  rye and wheat along with 2 g each of white and red malts made from the same flours and mixed it up well.  We then added another  455 g of water and mixed again before adding 315 g each of bread and AP flour and mixing again.  This gave us a 72% hydration dough that has 10% whole grains and 1% SD starter. 

We let the dough autolyse for 30 minutes before adding 11 g of salt and starting 15 minutes of  French Slap and folds.  We expect to let the dough ferment for 24 hours before  letting it rise again for 12 hours before baking.  The gluten was well developed after the slap and folds and the dough ball looked like this:

Michael Wilson has had a positive effect on my dough balls!  Can't wait to try out his panettone !

 

11 AM  11/04/2012                                                                                 7 PM 11/04/2012  +- 10% increase in volume

11 PM  11/04/2012   +-20% increase in volume                               3 AM  11/05/2012  +- 30 %increase in volume

 

7 AM  + 100% increase in volume

It only took 20 hours to double in volume starting with 1% starter to flour ratio.  Time to split it up and and proof a loaf of fig, pistachio, sunflower and pumpkin seed bread and one plain old SFSF - and see how long they take to double.  The round is SFSD.

The reality was that the dough had doubled again in 4 hours and was ready for Big Old Betsy to bake up so we did.  At our hot kitchen temp of nearly 79 F  Doc.Dough spreadsheet said we would ne ready to bake in less time but we might have over proofed it a little too.

Here they are proofed.  24 hours on the counter from mixing the dough to baking it off worked for this starter, flour and hydration combination.

I will do another post to cover the bread itself which baked up very well.

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After watching David Snyder develop his SFSD and baking it several times it tuned out to be as good as his San Joaquin and Pugliesi Capriosso.  All 3 are fine SD breads but each is a little light on whole grains that we love so much around here for taste, as well as, health reasons.  We would like to get to at least 25% whole grains in most of our breads.

 

The problem is that the more whole grains you put in, the more likely the big holes are going to disappear.  But Empress Ying has no problem getting big holes in her famous 36 Hour Baguettes - even with 40% whole grains.  Both David and Ying are amazing bakers - really!

  

So, we feel that with a little luck we should be able to get some decent holes in some SF style SD bread with up to 40% whole grains but, we realize that we won’t get the holes Ying or David manage to coax out their breads - at least not in this lifetime or even on this planet for that matter.

 

We decided to start with 15% whole grains made up of equal amounts of Spelt, WW and Rye and work our way up over time to 40% whole grains and see what happens.  We started out with 72% hydration on the initial bake and will up the percent as the whole grain increases.  We like the flavor that these 3 whole grains bring to SD breads.

  

We used 15 g of our Desem and Rye Sour starter and made one build to 175 G of levain over 6 hours.  The levain ended up being 20% of the total weight of the dough - a percent that we like to build to for a 12 hour 37 F retard.

 

We also did a 3 hour autolyse with the salt, water and flour.  After the levain was hand mixed into the autolyse, we did 10 minutes of French slap and folds and then allowed the dough to rest for 30 minutes in an oiled plastic covered bowl.  We then did 3 sets of S&F’s on half hour intervals.  We stopped each set when the dough started to resist the stretch.

 

The dough was then pre-shaped into a boule and allowed to rest for 10 minutes before final shaping and placing seam side up in a floured basket.  It was immediately placed in a trash can liner, end closed with a rubber band and placed into the fridge for a 12 hour retard. 

 

The next morning the basket and liner were removed from the fridge and allowed to come to room temperature and the finish proofing – about 3 hours total.  I’ve used this basket several times before, with much wetter dough but this time the dough pushed itself out through the lower set of  holes for some reason.

  

It made for a more difficult dough removal and I had to sort of rotate the dough and basket as I jiggled and pried the dough out gently.  It did deflate a little bit but I was surprised that it didn’t really deflate like a higher hydration dough surly would have.  We slashed it in a triangle shape with a non serrated paring knife and will never use a single edge razor blade again.  We tried a different method for each slash.  The first one was 30 degrees and ½” deep trying for an ear, the 2nd was 45 degrees a ¼” deep and the 3rd was 90 degrees and 1/8” deep trying to get bloom.  All 3 worked out great for once as the pictures show.

We chucked it with peel and parchment onto the stone in the 500 F preheated oven (45 minutes) with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans.  We also tossed in 1/2 C of water into the bottom of the oven as we shut the door.  We immediately turned the oven down to 450 F.

At the 12 minute mark we removed the steam, turned the oven down to 425 F convection and baked the bread for another 10 minutes turning it 180 degree on the stone every 5 minutes.  At the 22 minute mark it registered 208 degrees.

We turned the oven off and let the boule crisp on the stone for another 10 minutes with oven door ajar.  It hit 210 F while crisping.  We removed it to a cooling rack and let it sit for 1 ½ hours before slicing. 

This is the best looking inside and out and best testing SFSD bread we have ever manage to bake.  The spring was very good.  The crust went soft as it cooled, was well blistered and was a beautiful shade of reddish brown.  The crumb was open, soft and moist.  The taste was tangy sour but not overly so – just delicious.

Can’t wait to start the next bake upping the whole grains and hydration to see if we like it better but this bread will be hard to beat.  It is nice when a bake comes together so well.  Thanks goes out to David Snyder for his work on his fine SFSD version 4 that this bread was based on.

Formula

 

 

 

 

 

 Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

15

2.99%

Spelt

20

4.83%

Whole Wheat

20

4.83%

Dark Rye

20

4.83%

AP

20

4.83%

Water

80

19.32%

Total Starter

175

42.27%

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

Levain % of Total

20.05%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Bread Flour

191

46.14%

Whole spelt

3

0.72%

Dark Rye

3

0.72%

Whole Wheat

3

0.72%

Insant Potato Flakes

10

2.42%

AP

200

48.31%

Dough Flour

414

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.93%

Water

276

66.67%

Dough Hydration

66.67%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

501.5

 

Water

363.5

 

T. Dough Hydration

72.48%

 

Whole Grain %

15.25%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.48%

 

Total Weight

873

 

 

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