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dmsnyder

 I first posted a formula for a naturally leavened  pugliese bread 11 years ago. I fiddled with the formula and procedure a bit over several years, but I haven’t made this bread in about 6 years. Today’s version is different from some of the ones I have made before in a couple respects: First, I use an all-white flour biga rather than a mixed grain liquid levain. And, second, I hand mixed rather than using a stand mixer. 

 The dough had excellent gluten development. It was silky smooth yet quite loose and extensible. It spread a bit when transferred to the baking stone but had very good oven spring.

 

Total Dough

Wt. (g)

Baker’s %

All Purpose Flour

442

78

Fine Durum Flour

125

22

Water

433

76

Salt

10

1.8

Total

1010

177.8

 

Biga Naturalle

Wt. (g)

Baker’s %

All Purpose Flour

48

100

Water

24

50

Ripe stiff levain (50% hydration)

29

60

Total

101

210

1. Dissolve the levain in the water.

2. Mix in the flour to hydrate well.

3. Cover and ferment at 78ºF until double in volume.

4. Refrigerate overnight

 

 

Final Dough

Wt. (g)

All Purpose Flour

375

Fine Durum Flour

125

Water

400

Salt

10

Biga

100

Total

1010

 

Procedure

  1. Take the biga out of the refrigerator and warm to room temperature.
  2. Mix the water and flours to a shaggy mass, cover and autolyse for 60 minutes. (Note that Durum flour absorbs water more slowly than AP flour.)
  3. Sprinkle the salt over the dough, then add the biga in chunks. Mix the salt and biga into the dough using the pinch and fold method.
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled container large enough to accommodate a doubling in volume. Cover the container.
  5. Ferment at 80ºF until the dough is almost doubled with stretch and folds at 30 and 60 minutes. (about 4-5 hours)
  6. Transfer the dough to a floured board and pre-shape as a ball. Cover and let rest for 10-20 minutes.
  7. Shape as a boule and transfer to a floured banneton, seam side down. Place in a food safe plastic bag and proof. (About 2 hours.)
  8. 45-60 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone or steel on a middle rack and your steaming apparatus ready to use.
  9. Turn the oven temperature down to 460ºF. Transfer the loaf to the stone (seam side up) and steam the oven.
  10. After 15 minutes, remove the steam source. Bake for another 20-30 minutes or until the loaf is fully baked. The crust should be nicely colored. The internal temperature should be at least 205ºF. The loaf should sound hollow when thumped on the bottom.
  11. Optionally, leave the loaf on the baking stone with oven turned off and the door ajar to dry the crust further.
  12. Transfer the loaf to a cooling rack. Cool completely before slicing. 

 

The crust was chewy. The crumb was cool, moist and soft-chewy. The flavor was not sour in the least but just a good white bread. I did not detect any distinct flavor contribution of the durum flour. Nice bread, but I do prefer one with 30-40% whole grain flour these days. YMMV. 

 Happy baking!

 David

 

 

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dmsnyder

Today I baked a couple loaves of Hamelman's Oatmeal Bread with Cinnamon and Raisins. It was my third bake of this recipe. The only modification I made was, while I had used AP flour before, this time I used King Arthur Baking "Bread Flour." The higher-gluten flour was naturally a bit thirstier, and it ended up with a more open crumb. It was a bit chewier, but the flavor was unchanged.

One glitch was that the loaves were about 3/4 proofed when I had to leave for a dental appointment, so I stuck them in the fridge. When I got home about to hours later, I thought the loaves were borderline over-proofed, but after baking, cooling, slicing and tasting, I find no fault with them.

This is a very nice toast bread. We'll have it for breakfast spread with home-made almond butter. Yum!

Here's the formula and process:

Oatmeal Bread with Cinnamon and Raisins

from Jeffrey Hamelman’s “Bread,” 3rd Edition

 

 

Ingredients

Baker’s %

Wt for 1 large loaf

Wt for 2 large loaves

Bread Flour

75

208

416

Whole Wheat Flour

25

69.3

138.6

Rolled Oats

16.5

45.76

91.52

Water

62.5

173.3* 

346.6**

Milk

11

30.5

61

Honey

7.5

20.8

41.6

Vegetable Oil

7.5

20.8

41.6

Salt

2.2

6.1

12.2

Instant Yeast

3.5

9.7

19.4

Cinnamon

1.5

4.16

8.32

Raisins (soaked and drained)

33

91.5

183

Total

245.2

679.92

1360

 

Note: For 8x4 “ pans, scale loaves to 510g. For 9x5” pans, scale to 580g.

 

Procedures

  1. The night before baking, soak the oats in an equal weight of water (from the total water). Rinse and drain the raisins.
  2. Add all the ingredients except the raisins to the mixer bowl. Mix for 3 minutes on Speed 1, then for 3-8 minutes at Speed 2 to moderate gluten development.  The dough should be moderately loose and slightly tacky. Note: Don’t forget to subtract the water used to soak the oats from the water added when mixing.
  3. Add the raisins and mix at Speed 1 to incorporate them.
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board and knead briefly, then form a ball.
  5. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and cover. 
  6. Bulk ferment until dough is doubled (90 to 120 min.) Fold dough once after 1 hour. Note: Alternatively, the dough can be cold retarded after mixing.
  7. Divide the dough and pre-shape into rounds. Note: Can be divided and shaped for hearth baking or as rolls. Rest pieces for 10-15 minutes.
  8. Shape as pan loaves (or otherwise, as desired) and place smooth side up in oiled bread pans. Place pans in plastic bakery bags and seal or cover them with a cloth. Optionally, dampen the loaves’ and sprinkle with rolled oats.
  9. Proof at 76ºF until loaves peek above the pan rims (30-90 min.)
  10. Bake with steam at 450ºF. After 15 minutes, remove the steaming apparatus and lower the oven temperature to 430ºF (If the loaves are browning too fast, lower the oven temperature another 10-F. Note: 510g loves will bake in 30-35 minutes, total. 680g loaves will take up to 40 minutes total.

 

* 45.8g water to soak the oats. 127.5g water for the final mix.

** 91.5g water to soak the oats. 255.g water for the final mix.

Enjoy!

David

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dmsnyder

Today's bake is loosely based on Ken Forkish's "Overnight Country Brown." I increased the levain and did the "overnight" in the fridge after dividing and shaping rather than in bulk at room temperature. Well, the hydration is higher too - 85.5 versus 78%. The result is a moderately sour, crusty loaf with a fairly open, deliciously moist and tender crumb. The flavor is more straight ahead wheaty than my favorite multigrain sourdough, but this is also a spectacularly delicious bread. I had some almost cooled with a light smear of butter, along with a bowl of split pea soup for lunch.

Here is the formula and method and some photos:

Sourdough Bread with 31% Home-Milled Whole Wheat Flour

David M. Snyder

January, 2022

Total Dough 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bakers' %

Bread Flour

675

67.5

Whole Wheat flour

314

31.4

Water

855

85.5

Salt

21

2.1

Total

1865

186.5

Note: The whole grain wheat,is milled in a Mockmill 100 mill set at its finest setting. The flour is milled immediately before mixing.

Levain

 

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bakers' %

Bread flour (hi protein)

144

75

Whole Wheat flour

36

25

Water

144

75

Active starter

36

25

Total

360

200

  1. Dissolve the starter in the water. Add the flours and mix thoroughly.

  2. Transfer to a clean container, cover and ferment until ripe. If you don't use it immediately, it can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

 

Final Dough

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bread flour (AP)

524

Whole Wheat flour

276

Water (85-95ºF)

684

Salt

21

Active levain

360

Total

1865

 

Procedures

  1. Mix the flours with the water to a shaggy mass.

  2. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 20-60 minutes. (Autolyse)

  3. Sprinkle the salt over the dough surface and add the levain in 4 to 6 portions.

  4. Mix thoroughly. (I start by folding in the salt and levain with a silicon spatula. Then, I use the method Forkish specifies – squeezing the dough between my fingers alternating with stretch and folds in the bowl. I wear a food service grade glove and dip my working hand frequently in water.)

  5. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled, clean bowl large enough to accommodate doubling in volume. Cover well.

  6. Ferment at 80ºF for 3 – 3.5 hours with stretch and folds in the bowl at 30 and 60 minutes, then a stretch and fold on the board at 1:45-2:00 hours. The dough should have nearly doubled in volume and be quite puffy.

  7. Transfer the dough to a well-floured board. 

  8. Divide the dough as desired and pre-shape in rounds. Cover with a cloth and let rest for 20-30 minutes.

  9. Shape as boules or bâtards and place in floured bannetons. Place these in food-grade plastic bags sealed with ties and let proof for 30-60 minutes at room temperature. Refrigerate 8 hours or up to 36 hours at 40ºF.

  10. The next day, pre-heat oven. Let the loaves sit at room temperature while the oven pre-heats. You can bake on a baking stone with steam for the first part of the bake, or in Dutch ovens, as you prefer. The oven temperature and length of the bake will depend on which of these methods you choose and on the weight and shape of your loaves, as well as on how dark you prefer your crust. When done, the loaves should sound hollow when thumped on their bottoms. The internal temperature should be at least 205ºF.

  11. Let the loves cool completely on a rack for 1-2 hours before slicing.

I baked in Cast Iron Dutch ovens at 475ºF for 30 minutes covered, then 20 minutes un-covered at 460ºF.

 

Happy baking!

David

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dmsnyder

I haven't posted here for a while. I bake most weeks once or twice, usually my favorite multigrain sourdough or a Buttermilk-Spelt Sourdough. I always have some San Joaquin Sourdough baguettes available in the freezer, of course.

This week, I baked a batch of sandwich rolls made with Medium Vienna Dough from "Inside the Jewish Bakery." The plan was to have rolls for turkey sandwiches, but we use these for hamburgers, sausages and tuna salad sandwiches most often.

Today, I baked loaves of Hamelman's Five Grain Levain. I hadn't joined the "Community Bake" of this bread. It's been a few years since I've baked it, but I recently restocked fresh ingredients with the plan to revisit this old favorite.

In anticipation of a feast tomorrow, we had a light dinner tonight - a few slices of 5 grain levain with Cotswold cheese and a cucumber salad. This bread is so good!

Here's a photo of the crumb:

I hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

David

 

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dmsnyder

Some foods are great made with a variety of breads - different but all good. Some foods really call for a specific type of bread. Cracked Dungeness crab just is wrong IMO without San Francisco Sourdough. You probably have your own biases. Well, another of mine is that Cabbage Borscht is "right" only with a dark rye bread.

David

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dmsnyder

Number 2 son and his family are visiting. This is the first face-to-face family contact we have had in a year and a half. It's so nice. It's also an excuse to bake. Here's a sampling of what I've offered ...

Jewish sour rye and Berliner Landbrot

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes and Epis

Sourdough Pizzas (This is one of four)

Multi-grain Sourdough's (AP, and home-milled Whole Wheat, Rye and Spelt)

I didn't get a photo of the peach crumble my son and dil made while I was working on the pizza. It was pretty yummy with vanilla frozen yoghurt.

You should know that we don't have any sons who didn't grow into amazing cooks and bakers. 

Hope everyone had a patriotic and delicious and safe and sane 4th of July!

David

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dmsnyder

I haven't made a miche in a very long time. Last week, I got a bag of high extraction ("Type 80") flour from Central Milling and remembered that I had previously (like 11 years ago!) used this kind of flour for a miche based on the San Francisco Baking Institute formula that I liked a lot. We had made this bread for the Artisan II (Sourdough) workshop. Although we used white flour, our instructor told us that, ideally, it would be made with a high-extraction flour. My experience indicates this formula makes delicious bead either way. The main difference, besides flavor, is that using a high extraction flour results in significantly faster fermentation.

Miche from SFBI Artisan II 

David Snyder

 

 

Total Dough

Bakers %

Weight (g)

High extraction Flour

96.67

1087

WW Flour

3.33

38

Water

73.33

824

Salt

2

23

Wheat germ toasted

2.5

28

Total

177.83

2000

 

Pre-ferment

Bakers %

Weight (g)

High extraction Flour

75

112

WW Flour

25

38

Water

100

150

Salt

0

0

Liquid starter

50

75

Total

250

375

 1. Dissolve the starter in the water and mix in the flour. Desired Dough Temperature: 78ºF.

 2.  Ferment for 8-12 hours.

 

Final Dough

Weight (g)

High extraction flour

975

Water

675

Salt

23

Wheat germ toasted

28

Levain

299

Total

2000

 

Procedure

  1. Dissolve the levain in the water. Add the other ingredients and mix thoroughly by hand. DDT: 75-78ºF.
  2. Transfer the dough to a clean, lightly oiled bowl.
  3. Ferment for 3-4 hours with 4 folds at 50 minute intervals. (I did this by the “stretch and fold in the bowl” technique.)
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board. Pre-shape as a tight boule.
  5. Cover and let rest for 20-30 minutes to relax the gluten.
  6. Shape as a tight boule and place, seam side up, in a floured banneton.
  7. Cover and retard overnight in refrigerator.
  8. Remove the boule from the refrigerator and allow to warm and complete proofing for 1-3 hours. (Watch the dough, not the clock!)
  9. 45-60 minutes before baking, pre-heat the over to 500ºF with baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.
  10. When the loaf is proofed, transfer the boule to a peel. Slash the boule as desired, and transfer it to the baking stone. Steam the oven and reduce the temperature to 450ºF.
  11. Bake for 20 minutes, then remove your steaming apparatus.
  12. Turn the oven down to 425ºF.
  13. Continue baking for another 40-50 minutes. 
  14. Remove the boule to a cooling rack, and cool thoroughly before slicing.

This bake (in my relatively new oven) was less bold than expected. I will finish the bake at a higher temperature next time. 

The crust was mostly chewy. The crumb was moist and tender. The flavor was mildly sweet and wheaty. My recollection is that the flavor of these large loaves improves significantly over the first 2 days.

I enjoyed a couple still-warm slices with a little sweet butter with dinner.

 

Enjoy!

David

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dmsnyder

Maggie Glezer's book, "A Blessing of Bread," is a wonderful collection of Jewish baking from around the world along with a sort of ethnography of baking in the Jewish communities of the Diaspora. This book has, by my count, about 40 recipes for challah, the bread particularly associated with the Jewish sabbath. But the author also identifies the challah recipe she makes for her own family. As with most of her recipes, she provides both a commercially yeasted and a sourdough version (without saying which her family prefers).

I have made the sourdough version several times over the years. I like it quite a bit but my wife. doesn't. Today I finally got around to baking the non-sourdough version. You know what? It is the best challah I have ever tasted, and my wife loved it too. I should not be (and am not) surprised, if the author of the book with 40 challah recipes has chosen this one as her favorite, one might expect it to be something special.

This is clearly an enriched bread with quite a lot of vegetable oil, egg and honey, but it is not rich like brioche nor even as sweet as a traditional Vienna dough. It is perfectly "balanced." I had some for dinner without any accompaniment other than a bowl of chicken soup. I could have eaten both loaves right then (but didn't). Tomorrow, it's going to be French Toast for breakfast!

Addendum: DanAyo found that Maggie Glezer had shared this recipe on Epicurious in 2004. Here is the link: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/my-challah-235867

Note: Glezer hand kneads this bread. I mixed in a stand mixer, once the flour was added to the wet ingredients. I mixed about 3 minutes on Speed 1 and 4 minutes on Speed 2.

Addendum: It did make delicious French Toast.

David

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dmsnyder

My San Joaquin Sourdough originated in Anis Bouabsa's baguettes which had won the prize for the best baguette in Paris in 2008. Bouabsa's baguettes departed from convention in utilizing a 21 hour retardation after bulk fermentation and before dividing and shaping. Jennifer Stewart (Janedo on TFL) and I initially modified Bouabsa's formula by adding a bit of rye flour and some sourdough starter for flavor. I then omitted the commercial yeast altogether and began using the modified formula to shape as bâtards. Over time, I have tweaked the formula and method in various ways, but have settled on the current one as providing the best product. 

I have used this dough and method for many breads - baguettes, demi-baguettes, ficelles, pain rustique, boules and even for pizza crust. It is quite versatile and always has a delicious flavor. Of course, the baking times and temperatures require appropriate adjustment for each size and shape of loaf.

I have been gratified by the popularity of my San Joaquin Sourdough bread. It has been baked and enjoyed on every continent except Antarctica, at least as far as I know. Based on TFL posts, it seems that the SJSD has been most enjoyed as baguettes. Over the years, I have baked it in many forms, but the original shape was a bâtard of about 490gms. 

I baked a couple San Joaquin Sourdough bâtards today. One went to an appreciative (and appreciated) neighbor.

 

Total ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

479

89

WW Flour

33

6

Medium rye Flour

29

5

Water

392

72

Salt

10

1.8

Liquid starter

17

3

Total

960

176.8

9.2% of the flour is pre-fermented

 

Liquid Levain ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

29

70

WW Flour

8

20

Medium rye Flour

4

10

Water

42

100

Liquid starter

17

40

Total

100

240 

Final dough ingredients

Wt (g)

AP Flour

450

WW Flour

25

Medium rye Flour

25

Water

350

Salt

10

Liquid levain

100

Total

960

Method

  1. Mix the levain by dissolving the liquid starter in the water, then add the flours and mix well. Ferment at room temperature, covered tightly, until the surface is bubbly and wrinkled. (8-12 hours)
  2. Dissolve the levain in the water, add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.
  3. Add the salt and mix to incorporate.
  4. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly.
  5. Bulk ferment for 3-4 hours with stretch and folds in the bowl every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours, then a stretch and fold on the board after 2.5 hours. The dough should have expanded by about 50% and be full of small bubbles.
  6. Refrigerate the dough for 18-24 hours.
  7. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and transfer it to a lightly floured board.
  8. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces for demi-baguettes or into two equal pieces fro bâtards, and pre-shape as logs or round.
  9. Cover the pieces and allow them to rest for 60 minutes.
  10. Shape as baguettes or bâtards and proof for 45 minutes, covered.
  11. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.
  12. Transfer the loaves to your peel. 
  13. For baguesttes, turn down the oven to 480ºF. For bâtards, turn down the oven toe 460ºF. Score the loaves and load them onto your baking stone.
  14. Bake with steam for 10 minutes, then remove your steaming apparatus and continue to bake for another 10-12 minutes for baguettes or 20 minutes for bâtards.
  15. Remove the loaves to a cooling rack, and cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Enjoy!

David

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dmsnyder

Buttermilk-Spelt Bread with Rye Sour

David Snyder

December, 2020

 

I had a quart of buttermilk in the fridge. I only needed a cup for pancakes. I hated to waste any. And I had some really nice rye sour left over from the rye breads I baked last week. And there was a newly-arrived bag of spelt berries in the pantry. So, I made Cecilia Agni Hadiyanto’s Buttermilk-Spelt Sourdough Bread using a rye sour for leavening.

Total Dough

 

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bakers' %

Medium rye flour

55

10

Whole spelt flour

200

36

All Purpose flour

300

54

Buttermilk

425

77

Water

55

10

Salt

10

1.8

Total

1045

188.8

 

Levain

 

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bakers' %

Medium rye flour

55

100

Water

55

100

Ripe rye sour

22

22

Total

132

222

  1. Dissolve the rye sour in the water. 

  2. Add the flours and mix thoroughly.

  3. Place in a clean container with a tight lid and ferment at room temperature until ripe.

  4. If not ready to mix the final dough, you can refrigerate the rye sour for up to 3 days.

 

Final Dough

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Whole spelt flour

200

All Purpose flour

300

Ripe rye sour

110

Buttermilk

425

Salt

10

Total

1045

Procedure

  1. Mix all of the ingredients except the salt to a shaggy mass in a medium bowl and cover.

  2. Autolyse for 30-120 minutes.

  3. Sprinkle the salt over the dough and incorporate completely. (I use the pinch and fold method described by Forkish in “Flour Water Salt Yeast.”)

  4. Transfer the dough to a clean, lightly oiled bowl with a cover.

  5. Bulk ferment at 76-80ºF until double in volume (about 4-8 hours, depending on temperature) with Stretch & Fold in the bowl at 30 and 60 minutes and a stretch and fold on the board at 120 minutes).

  6. Pre-shape round and cover. Let rest for 20 minutes or so.

  7. Shape as boule or bâtard and place in a floured banneton. Cover with a towel or place in a food grade plastic bag.

  8. Proof for 1-2 hours at room temperature, then cold retard for 12-18 hours.

  9. Bake in a Dutch oven at 460ºF covered for 20 minutes. Uncover. Continue baking at 420ºF for 30 minutes. (The falling temperature approach is because this bread tends to darken very quickly due to the buttermilk. So keep an eye on it and adjust your oven temperature accordingly.) Alternatively, bake at 460ºF on a pre-heated baking stone for 15 minutes with steam then for 30 minutes at 44ºF for 25-30 minutes.

  10. Cool on a rack thoroughly before slicing. 

I baked this loaf on a baking stone, and failed to heed my own advice, finishing the bake at 450ºF rather than 440ºF. It was  dark even for my taste. However, the flavor did not suffer. In fact, the crust was delightfully crunchy and very tasty. The crumb was moderately chewy and moderately sour. The taste was quite complex with some sweetness and nuttiness. There was nothing that suggested rye's contribution to the taste, but I have found from other breads that the effect of 10% rye is subtle but definitely a positive contribution to flavor.

This is a delicious bread I expect to make again.

David

 

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