The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

anyone here use the heirloom cookie sheet?

pcake's picture
pcake

anyone here use the heirloom cookie sheet?

has anyone here baked with the heirloom cookie sheet?  
http://www.heirloomcookiesheets.com/cmshome.php?Meet-the-Sheet-28

i had been interested in the all-clad cookie sheet until i saw one in person.  it wasn't that heavy for the price, and this heirloom seems comparable for half the price after shipping, but they don't sell the heirloom anywhere in person.  

i was interested in the anolon cookie sheet, which i saw in person and the smaller one is heavy and stiff, but the coating is the chemical teflon is made of, and my husband's doctor says to avoid that if i bake at higher temps.

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

Stainless steel is a poor conductor of heat, so it's a poor choice for any cooking application. Teflon-coated is perfectly safe at cookie-baking temps.

This is the best cookie sheet made:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GX8B34/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I have four of them.

HansB's picture
HansB

Poor for any cooking application? Ever hear of All-Clad? Every restaurant uses a SS griddle. Baking Steel is perfect for pizza...

https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/04/baking-steel-mini-griddle-burgers-pizza-deal.html

 

https://slice.seriouseats.com/2012/09/the-pizza-lab-the-baking-steel-delivers.html

pcake's picture
pcake

i saw the large and small all-clad cookie sheets at williams sonoma two weekends ago.  they were very nice!  i'm tempted...

baking steel makes some nice looking products, but i'm hoping to avoid seasoning.

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

Did you know that the "Clad" in All-Clad means that the stainless steel is just a wrapper for a core of aluminum, which is a good heat conductor?

Baking Steel is NOT stainless steel, but carbon steel. And every griddle that I've seen in restaurants looks to be carbon steel.

HansB's picture
HansB

FYI, here are about 50 Stainless Steel griddles...

 

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/search/griddle.html

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

I believe that most or all of these have stainless steel frames, but just steel plates. I just pulled up one at random, and viewed the specs from the manufacturer. The specs said "3/4” thick polished steel cooking surface", which is not stainless. One restaurant supply website says this:

Quote:
Steel is the most commonly used material for griddle plates: it conducts heat relatively well, it’s easy to clean and it has a non-stick surface. Mild steel is the preferred type and accounts for the majority of griddles available, due to its durability compared to stainless steel. However mild steel will rust without regular oiling and treatment.

Other websites say the same thing. I won't say you can't find one with a solid stainless surface, but it's clearly uncommon.

Seriously, dude, I'm really not interested in debating this any further. It's well known that stainless is a bad cooking surface unless it's bonded to something with higher conductivity. If you don't wish to accept that, that's OK with me.

 

 

pcake's picture
pcake

i don't use cookie sheets for cookies - i bake bread on them at up to 500 f or a hair more.  

i use lots of steel.  it does what works for me.  i would just use cast iron but i'm not a fan of maintenance.  

btw, i use some granite ware, which is very thin steel, and it gets the bottoms of my breads nice and crisp.

 

 

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

No one says you shouldn't use steel, but you shouldn't use *stainless* steel.

edit: I guess I need to point out that stainless steel that covers a better cooking material is fine...This is typically aluminum, but I've also seen copper.

I will also note that seasoning carbon steel or cast iron for baking on doesn't need the same effort that a skillet would, assuming you use parchment.

 

Dsr303's picture
Dsr303

i use Dough Makers. Made by a husband for his wife. Have had mine for years,use them for breads,cookies or anything. They do not have sides,I usually start my pizzas on them until they are set,then slide them onto stone then use it as peel to get pizza out. They are not thick but they are great

BobBoule's picture
BobBoule

the Williams-Sonoma GoldTouch baking sheets for years now and they really work very well, don't rust, don't stick and don't warp. They are expensive but there is an alternative by ChefMade that comes with a guarantee that has a similar construction (aluminized steel with a non-stick coating). https://amzn.to/2kxTMrM

pcake's picture
pcake

i didn't mean to start a debate :(

i started out asking about a particular cookie sheet i was interested in, but i guess no one here has tried it.  the company, for what it's worth, has been very responsive, and have replied to all my emails.  but i admit that while the all-clad cookie sheet is more expensive, it has a terrific warranty and all-clad, too, has been very responsive.

i just did my first bake with a granite ware pizza pan - enamel over thin carbon steel.  the bottom of the loaf was a lot darker than the top, but honestly it was pretty tasty all the way through.  had the pizza pan been a little thicker, it might have been better, but it's quite stiff and easy to handle.