The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Viennese Potato (and Raisins) Bread

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

Viennese Potato (and Raisins) Bread

I was really excited after being able to buy  Barbara van Melle's book "Der Duft von frischem Brot" ("The Aroma of Fresh Bread") last week in Vienna.  It's a wonderful collection of recipes from the supposed best master bakers of Austria.  So I was really itching to try out a recipe this weekend and it did not disappoint!

I decided on something easy: Wiener Kartoffelbrot (Viennese Potato Bread, although I prefer adding Raisins to the title since it makes much more sense) from Josef Schrott.  Even though it has potatoes in the bread, you really can't taste that they are there.  The raisins, candied oranges, and other flavors of the bread really make you think it is something entirely different.  Although, I found it slightly too sweet; so I think I'll have to add slightly less sugar next time.  But regardless! it is incredibly delicious and very light (contrary to it being a potato bread).  It reminds me of a brioche with flavoring added to the dough and less fat content.  It makes for a really great dessert bread or perhaps something sweet with breakfast.

Flour (APF)                        100%
Eggs                                    28%
Potatoes (peeled, cooked)  20%
Milk (80°F)                          20%
Raisins                                20%
Butter (softened)                 10%
Sugar                                  10%
Yeast (fresh)                         8%
Candied Orange Pieces       3%
Vanilla Sugar*                       2%
Salt                                    1.5%
Lemon Juice                         1%
Distastic Malt Powder          1%
-------------------------------------------
Total                               224.5%    (1122.5g for a large round loaf or can be divided into two med. sized loafs)

*Can be substituted with 1.5 tsp sugar + 1tsp vanilla extract.

Dissolve yeast in milk.  Mix all ingredients except raisins.
Speed 1 - 4 mins
Speed 2 - 8 mins

Add raisins
Speed 1 - 2 mins

Bulk Rise - 45 mins

Divide, shape, proof - 45 mins

Brush with (1 egg yolk + 1 Tbsp milk), dry - 5 mins

Bake 350°F - 30 mins

Remove and cool

Guten Appetit!

isand66's picture
isand66

This looks great.  Thanks for sharing. Do they have an English version of this book or is it only in German?

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

Thank you!  Unfortunately, I think it's only in German.  But that gives me an idea to write to the author or perhaps publisher to suggest they print an English version.  New market and such.  I'll update the main post with percentages and times so others on here can try it out. =) 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

multiply % by 5 grams for metric total of 1122.5g of dough.    ;)

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

Sorry, perhaps I wasn't clear with it.  I use the total percentage to calculate how much flour to use.  So I take the total dough weight then divide by the total percentage to get the weight of the flour.  Then I calculate the weight of the rest of the ingredients from the weight of flour.

Ingrid G's picture
Ingrid G

and here are the measurements in metric:

1000g Flour (APF)                       100%
280g Eggs                                    28%
200g floury potatoes (peeled, cooked)  20%
200g Milk lukewarm                      20%
200g Raisins                                20%
100g Butter (softened)                 10%
100g Sugar                                  10%
80g Yeast (fresh)                         8%
30g Candied Orange Pieces       3%
20g Vanilla Sugar*                       2%
15g Salt                                       1.5%
10g Lemon Juice                         1%
10g Distastic Malt Powder          1%
-------------------------------------------
Total                               224.5%    (1,122.5g for a large round loaf or can be divided into two med. sized loafs)

*Can be substituted with 1.5 tsp sugar + 1tsp vanilla extract.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think I will stick to the smaller loaf (500g flour) so I can fit it into my mini oven.  Can't go much larger than 1200g dough.  I too have a slightly simpler recipe with 2 eggs about the same size, same glaze etc.  I add vanilla and lemon zest instead of juice and see candied orange as optional.  I use 11g instant yeast per 500g flour.  This is a "watch the clock" in the beginning stages.  This can also be braided like a brioche.

Mini

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

The original says the loaf is 1122.5g but I decided to divide that into two smaller loafs and thought they were still fairly good sized.  

I would recommend keeping the orange flavoring (can substitute with zest or something else).  The orange flavor and raisins really what make this one stand out, in my opinion.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I have some orange peel frozen, guess I better get to candying it or chopping it up into fine little pieces.  :)   

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Mini, does your method differ from mine?  I use an Oxo serrated peeler (that has peeled skin on occasion) and is so sharp is gets only peel, no pith.  I peel wide strips, place in a stack, then wrap and freeze.  Unless otherwise labeled, I know that 1 stack is peel of 1 fruit (orange, lemon or lime).  Use as is, or while frozen slice into zest or finely mince; the citrus oil is retained.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Sharp little teethy peeler (different brand but same description.) I wash the fruit and pat it dry.  Then start at the top and just go around and around, then drop the clean peel into a small plastic bag. press out the air and tie a knot.  Grand finale is tossing into a container in the freezer with other little bags of goodies so they don't wander all over the place!  

chouette22's picture
chouette22

...don't you? :) I just looked up your other recipes and am intrigued by the Fladenbrot you had posted some time ago. I also follow Lutz Geißler's blog (have for a very long time) - do you bake from his book a lot? I have been thinking of buying it whenever I am in Europe; on the other hand my bread recipe file overflows anyway and I certainly don't need another bread baking book, haha. 

Your bread looks fantastic!

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

Haha, it would seem so.  Actually it's just a coincidence so far.  I haven't posted all my breads that I've baked to here.  

But to answer your question about Lutz's book is definitely yes!  It's one of the better bread books I own.  I say this for his Brot Back Buch Nr. 1.  I looked at the Nr. 2 book and didn't really like the format: caters more to everyday baking as opposed to the first book which is targeted to more artisinal bakers.  You can find it on Amazon in the States, which is how I got mine, if you don't feel like waiting until you go to Europe.

Many thanks for the compliment!  I promise I'll post other things without potatoes in it haha ;-)

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

You probably know about this blog as well, but brotdoc.com is also another great German bread blog in case you didn't know and were interested.

chouette22's picture
chouette22

I do know it and follow it as well - thank you though!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Would you mind if I featured this on the homepage for a bit? I bet other folks would enjoy this too.

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

As cliche as it sounds, I'd be honored, especially amongst so many excellent bakers.
I hope a lot of others enjoy this loaf.  Easy one to make with great results.  =)

Ingrid G's picture
Ingrid G

I'm used to that kind of 'bread' (I'm originally from Austria). We often use potatoes in sweet bread. It keeps it moist as well.

Best eaten with salted butter!

I have the same recipe book. Franz Brandl is still famous for his hand-shaped Semmeln. Luckily I used to live in Linz and had access to his wonderful De Jour Gebäck (mini versions of Semmeln/Salzstangerl etc). His Pinzen are also famous.

Cheers from Australia!

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

Danke sehr!  Es war ganz lecker! ;-)

Ich möchte diese Bäckereien irgendwann besuchen.  Alle sehen toll aus.  Und auch die Pinzen und Handsemmeln sind auf meiner Liste zu backen.

Liebe Grüße aus Deutschland!

Ingrid G's picture
Ingrid G

I use a simple Milchzopf recipe I use often. Keeps fresh for a long time and can be easily frozen.

 

AnotherLoaf's picture
AnotherLoaf

Thanks for the post, and keep up the good work! marybeth

bäckerdave's picture
bäckerdave

I was (and so we're my friends) quite pleased with the results. :-)

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Can't wait to try this, it sounds yummy.  Can't go wrong with citrus and raisins.  Thanks for sharing!  Hope there's an English version of the book soon; my high school German is long forgotten. 

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

definitely one for the oven thanks backerdave

rizzo47's picture
rizzo47

Are you sure there's not an error with the yeast %.  8% does not seem correct. 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the yeast does seem high.  It is fresh yeast.  The dough is full of "weigh me downs"  but one would think 4% would be enough.  However.... I found the printed recipe in "Kurier.at" date 21.09.2015

Wiener Erdäpfelbrot von Josef Schrott  

 Teig: 200 g Rosinen, 200 g mehlige Erdäpfel (gekocht, geschält), 80 g Germ, 200 g Milch (25 Grad), 1000 g Weizenmehl (Type 700, gesiebt), 280 g Ei verquirlt, 100 g weiche Butter, 100 g Zucker, 30 g Aranzini15 g Salz, 20 g Vanillezucker, 10 g Zitronensaft, 10 g flüssiges Backmalz; Zum Bestreichen: 1 Eigelb und 1 EL Milch gut verquirlen...

As you can see for 1000g flour  (100%) indeed 8% fresh yeast is used.  Divide by 3 for Instant Yeast amount.  or 2.7%