The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Need Advice for Sticky Dough

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redgebendheim's picture
redgebendheim

Need Advice for Sticky Dough

Hi Everyone,

This is my first entry and I hope that I can find some help.  I bake mostly sourdough loafs (75% hydration) with organic Bobs Red Mill flower (90% white, 10%wheat, or sometimes 10% sprouted spelt).  Mostly I am very happy with the texture and taste of the bread, however I have one reoccurring problem…sometimes my bread will stick to my benneton during the final resting period.  Is it a matter of not dusting the bowl with enough flower?  

I have tried letting it rest at room temperature for 4 hours, or overnight in the refrigerator (8 hrs), but I have had it stick both ways.  Any advice?

Thanks,

Redge 

Comments

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

it should help a lot. If you have banettons with linen lining, the linings get seasoned fast and don't stick anymore. I made my own linings with some heavy linen cloth on wire baskets from a secondhand store.

redgebendheim's picture
redgebendheim

Thanks I will for sure try the rice flower. Do you always line the banettons with linens?  I like the circle lines of flower on the crust and would you still achieve that with the linens? Thanks!

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

will be gone. Rice flour should be sufficient not to make the dough stick, though.

isand66's picture
isand66

Use rice flour and you will be good to go.  You can combine it with AP flour if you want.  Sometimes it helps if you put some flour on the shapes dough before putting it in the basket.

baybakin's picture
baybakin

I read about using a 50/50 mix of brown rice flour and ap flour from Tartine Bread by Chad Robertson, and have been using it ever since.  works great, the white rice flour i've found doesn't work as well, but nothing seems to stick to that brown rice flour.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

How much do you use? It is difficult to get the rice to sit in all of the grooves as it seems to fall out and down easily. But it seems you need to get the rice flour in all of the groves, bottom to top (or at least as high as the dough will go).  Even rubbing it in is hard...to me it is like trying to get sand in the grooves but I don't know how much to jam in there.

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

I use brown rice flour. I got my rice flour and VWG mixed up a little while ago..now THAT stuck :)

emkay's picture
emkay

I use rice flour (brown and white) on my unlined brotforms/bannetons. My 77-80% hydration doughs come out fine when they are properly developed and proofed.

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

I don't think you need to really work the rice flour into the grooves. I have a spinkle container I use, but any container with large holes would work. I spin the banneton and give a good 4 or 5 shakes and it's good to go.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

so long.  Try shorter times in the banneton.  One hour, two tops for wet doughs.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Tartine loaves don't proof for only 1-2 hours. Do any soursoughs?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I stick to my devilish statement.  

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

You would bulk ferment in the fridge (turning for the first 3-4 hours like you'd do on the counter?), take it out, let it come to room temperature and then shape it so that it was in the basket for only 2-3 hours?

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Would you overnight bulk ferment in the fridge (turning for the first 3-4 hours like you'd do on the counter?), take it out, let it come to room temperature and then shape it so that it was in the basket for only 1-2 hours?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:) sort of, warm it up with my hands, spread it out and short rest and shape it right away.