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Rich Cinnamon Toast Bread Suggestions

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ehanner's picture
ehanner

Rich Cinnamon Toast Bread Suggestions

My daughter asked me to bring some rich cinnamon bread to substitute for French Toast next week at the Easter brunch she is hosting. She likes the idea of using the toaster instead of the mess and time to fry soaked bread for 18 people.


I'm hoping someone will have a favorite enriched cinnamon bread they will suggest. It has to be able to go in the toaster, so not a rolled up cinnamon bun. Thank you in advance. I don't usually make sweets like this so I'm not experienced in the recipe selection.


Eric

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Eric.


The cinnamon bread i usually make is the one from BBA. It is a cinnamon-raisin-walnut bread, and it's delicious. However, it is not a super-enriched bread. 


If I wanted a richer cinnamon bread, I think I would use the "middle class brioche" recipe from BBA (or the equivalent from another book) - In other words, a brioche with about 50% butter, at most. If you want something a little less rich, look at recipes for challah.


Just watch out when toasting. The high fat content will burn more easily in the toaster than a lean dough.


Yesterday, I made a couple loaves of Maggie Glazer's sourdough challah from "A Blessing of Bread." One of these days, I'm going to remember to try this dough in a cinnamon bread.


David

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Eric


I've seen a comment on here questioning yeast levels in relation to cinnamon.


I'm not sure Reinhart adjusts the quantity accordingly.   His recipe ideas are of course fabulous, but I'm sure you wouldn't fall victim to under-yeasting a dough enriched with high acidic spice content.   Hamelman's recipe on pp237??


What about the Hot Cross Bun posting on my blog?   You don't have to make buns with this, you could do a sort of teabread, then slice it for toast?   See: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/15382/ananda039s-2nd-blog-hot-cross-buns


Best wishes


Andy

plevee's picture
plevee

Toasted HCB's are a great suggestion; I just had too many for breakfast, they were so delicious.


Hamelman also has a recipe for an oat bread with cinnamon & raisins mixed in, rather than as a swirl which makes scrumptious toast.


I am of the opinion that all bread is just raw toast. ;>}  Patsy

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I'll take a look at that.


Eric

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Andy,


Thank you for your suggestion. Actually that might make a nice loaf. But, as I was reading your method, I found myself wondering what a Scotch Cutter is? Used to add the fruits and such with out damaging the dough. You got me on this one.


Eric

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Hi Eric 


I made Andy's HCB, they were delicious and very tender. While Andy suggests the dough may be difficult to manage by hand, I had no problem with it. When I saw your request for suggestions, it was this formula that came to mind. It was very easy, you could do a quick test run and see what you think. You've also had success with Dan Lepard's breads, I'm not at home so can't check his book, anything in there?


The Scotch Cutter is what I see called a bench scraper on TFL. I did try using mine to incorporate the dried fruit following the instructions & photo on Andy's blog, but I wasn't quite sure how to do it. In playing with various HCB formula of late, incorporating the dried fruit in the course of an 'on the bench S&F' has been easier for me to manage.


I've chosen to go with Foolish Poolish's sourdough HCB, adjusting for a more familiar spice blend (cinnamon, mixed spice, nutmeg, clove) as I prefer a more 'toothy' texture.


Regards, Robyn

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I'm not really understanding how a bench scraper would help dried fruits into the dough to be honest. The S&F would be my method I think.


I see there is some difference in the crossing paste used in various recipes. Andy's uses no sugar while many US versions make an icing that is put on after baking. What's your method of choice? I suspect the flour and oil is the traditional mix.


Eric

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Eric,


our crossing paste is plain and we pipe it on: have a look at the video.


I'm of the opinion that fondant icing is one of the more disgusting substances known to man.


Remember, I used to make these things by the thousand; hence piping = speed!


But that's how I like these buns, sugar paste just rots the teeth!


BTW, you're right my recipe is the traditional way; they're an English product by tradition, no? [Hamelmann, pp.266]


Yes adding the fruit within the stretch and fold will work fine.   This is something I teach in class, and we use a machine to mix the dough.   Short bulk proof while I get a coffee break!!! then we cut the fruit into the dough.


You'll probably get the idea now?


Best wishes


Andy

kutzeh's picture
kutzeh

tried and true and yummy too


CINNAMON BREAD                           
From: From:  Darlene Data Gricks, (Tom), New Castle, PA; 1975
1 Package Dry Yeast
¼ C Water
2 C Scalded Milk
½ C Sugar
½ C Shortening
2 tsp. Salt
2 Eggs Beaten
7 ½ - 8 C
Blend yeast and water. Add to scalded and cooled milk.  Add sugar shortening,  salt and eggs.  Mix in 3 C flour then a little at a time, then rest dough.  
Raise 1 ½ hours; punch, divide in 2-3 parts (one part for each loaf you will make).  Cover and rest 10 minutes.  Roll each and sprinkle with filling (divide filling into equal parts for each loaf you make).  Raise 1 hr.   Bake: 375°x 35 min.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Eric, I now use the following piping mix which is more than enough for 16 HCB (I make up about 1kg of dough and divide to half, quarter, eight, 16 and adjust the inevitable too big, too small  'odd men out' to about 65g, beats weighing them all):


60g flour, 1/4 tsp baking powder, 1 Tablespoon Oil, and about 60mls water. Mix to thick, pipeable batter. 


I say 'now' because until I made Yozza's HCB I had always used butter, which I rubbed into the flour first, (the way my father did it) but tried the oil and it was both easy and tasty. Without baking powder I find them a bit shellac like.


Cheers, Robyn

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Thanks Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

French toast for a crowd!  Eric, just in case your daughter decides to serve french toast to a crowd..Paula Deen has some wonderful 5 star recipes for baked french toast that would easily feed a crowd at the foodnetwork recipes.


Sylvia