The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

pizza stone

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pizzameister's picture

Win a Super Peel Contest

February 21, 2012 - 10:08am -- pizzameister

Hi all,

Just wanted to let the group know that we just launched a giveaway contest.  We are giving away two Super Peels to celebrate Pie  (pi) Day. 

All that is needed to enter is to  post a picture of your best (or worst) Pizza Wreck to the Super Peel Facebook Fan Page by March 12, and we will select the winners on March 14th, which is coincident with the Pizza Expo in Las Vegas!  This is just for fun and we are hoping to see a lot of pizza carnage!

PM

Gary

Ryan Sandler's picture

How big of a pizza can you bake in a home oven?

December 18, 2010 - 7:49pm -- Ryan Sandler

It is once again Christmas time, and once again I'm volunteering to bake pizzas on Christmas eve for my parents and in-laws.  Last year I baked a series of 7 personal-size pizzas on three stones in two ovens, with generally successful results.  This year my mother-in-law has requested/suggested making somewhat larger pizzas.

spinge's picture

Using/Sourcing Baking Stone Alternatives or Substitutes

September 17, 2010 - 4:33pm -- spinge

I have read http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/507 regarding baking stones, and some people cannot understand why for the love of god people are discussing quarry tiles and substitutes, when FDA approved baking stones are readily available.

I have no option but to choose a substitute to baking stone, and I'd be glad if you could help me find one. To put it bluntly,

To use a baking stone, a baker need to satisfy 3 conditions:

1) Live in a location where baking stones are available

wetodit's picture
wetodit

After reading this site (and many others) for some time, I have read and learned many tricks and tips from fantastic bakers on how to make a better loaf.  My goal is to just keep improving and making my loaves a little better each time.  I don't really make them for anyone in particular.  My wife will have a piece once in a while but I usually make bread for myself.  I think I've achieved a pretty consistent recipe that yields a fairly consistent loaf, and I would like to use this blog spot to discuss the different cooking vessels for baking the bread.  Although the cooking vessel won't necessarily improve the flavor of the loaf, it's interesting to see what kind of difference these things make while baking. 


In the next few post, I plan share with you all the results of my baking so that we can all see what an average (or sub-average) baker with readily available (and relatively inexpensive) tools and equipment can make in his home kitchen.  In particular, I will use my standard recipe as a control and will bake the loaves in: a sheet pan, on a pizza stone, in a dutch oven, on some newly-acquired fire brick, and maybe even on my grill with some of the aforementioned vessels so that we can all actually see what we get when we cook bread using these different techniques.


I hope to start in the next few days and will use the following "Plain as Jane" white bread recipe for all future loaves in this series:


4 cups AP flour (unbleached, of course)
1 1/4 cups water
1 tbs sugar
1 tbs salt
1 packet of yeast


This has produced a somewhat bland but soft and tasty loaf for m and I will use it as a control in my upcoming "experiments".


After this series is over, I will explore different recipes in order to expand the flavor of the loaves but, as Alton Brown says, that's another show.

Doc Tracy's picture

Help with loading bread off peel onto stone!

January 28, 2010 - 9:02am -- Doc Tracy
Forums: 

Help! I'm just learning to use my new peel and stone. Trying to break away from putting all my breads on or in a pan. So, today I had a beautiful loaf of Multi-flour miche ready to load into the oven. Thought I did everything right. I put cornmeal on the peel. Had the stone blazing hot. Went to load it and the darn thing stuck to the peel. I used my pastry cutter to push it off the peel and it ends up as a squished up mound at the front of the stone, stuck to the stone and the door of the oven.

natsea's picture

Pizza stone on woodstove

January 20, 2010 - 10:53am -- natsea

I would like to try baking a pizza on a pizza stone on my woodstove. Is that possible and if so, what is the best technique? I have a temperature guage on top of the woodstove and depending on how hot my fire is, it usually reads between 450 and 550 degrees. If I put the pizza stone on a hot woodstove, will it break? Would I need to place the pizza stone on the woodstove before I start the fire (or soon after)? What about using a pizza stone on a propane grill? Thank you!

nosabe332's picture
nosabe332

I decided after a few sensible, somewhat alarmist, posts here on TFL that i would not buy unglazed flooring tiles (terracotta, saltillo, etc) for use in my oven. There are too many health concerns involved with the manufacturing and raw material differences between flooring tiles and bakeware. Any cause for concern should not be ignored. It's likely that flooring tiles could be perfectly fine to bake with. On the other hand, maybe not.


It helps that I'm getting a good amount of money back after taxes, which I decided to spend on a baking stone and other baking equipment. And to keep track of what I could get, I'm putting together this list:


Sur La Table, (Best Manufacturers) $42, 14x16x5/8


Old Stone, (via Amazon) firebrick, $29.95, 14x16x?


Breadtopia, Fibrament, $51, 13x17.5x3/4, $69, 15x20x3/4


Ace Mart, American Metalcraft, Corderite, $44, 14x16x1/2


Central Restaurant, Fibrament, $58.49, 15x20x3/4


 


i never thought i'd see the day that sur la table looked like an economic option!

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