The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Milling

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Ghobz's picture

Local Bread Wheat in Quebec

February 21, 2013 - 7:36am -- Ghobz
Forums: 

I went to La Milanaise website to try and understand what the numbers stand for in their durum semolina. I buy my semolina at the grocery in transparent bags and I can see its texture and degree of fineness. But I can't with La Milanaise and I don't want to take the risk and buy a 20 kg bag and end up with one that is too coarse for my Moroccan bread making.

I didn't find an answer to my questions there, but I found this very interesting serie of 2 videos about local wheat in Quebec. I thought I'd share, taking the risk that those maybe were posted here before.

varda's picture
varda

Lately I have been baking with flour home-milled from hard red winter wheat from Upinngil Farm in Gill Massachusetts.     I have also been experimenting with sifting the milled flour to achieve different results, and after reading about bolting - see Andy's post and note below - with bolting as well.   My first attempt at bolting using a knee-high nylon didn't go well.   The less said the better.    Then I realized that cheese cloth has a fine mesh and might possibly be well suited for the task at hand.    So I have been playing around with using cheese cloth to bolt fresh milled flour, without much good baking results.   

Today, I came back to it and made another attempt.    I decided to use my regular white starter, rather than working with a whole wheat starter, which adds another layer of complexity.   And also constrained the process by determining that I would only use the Upinngil whole wheat for the final dough.   

I proceeded as follows:  

1.  Mill 514 g of wheat berries at medium setting

2.  Sift with #24 wire strainer

3.  Mill what is caught in the sieve at fine setting

4.  Sift with #30 wire strainer

This process removed 50g of bran.

5.   Place flour on top of a square of cheese cloth and form a bag by folding up corners and securing with a twist tie

6.  Shake, bounce, bump, etc. into a wooden bowl.    (Note this step takes awhile.)

At the end of this process I had 226g of golden flour with only tiny flecks of bran in it, and left in the cheese cloth was 226g of a coarse flour / semolina mix.  

I decided to make two loaves - one with the more refined flour, and one with the less refined flour.  They both came out quite breadlike.

The one with the refined flour was a bit better behaved than the other.

I would say both tasted good with the second loaf with a much more rustic, coarse crumb.

Here are the formulae:

 

Starter builds

 

 

 

 

 

12/7/2012

 

2:30 PM

9:30 PM

Total

Percent

Seed

29

 

 

 

 

KAAP

16

47

95

158

95%

Whole Rye

1

3

5

9

5%

Water

12

34

67

113

67%

 

 

 

 

280

9.7

12/8/2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final

Starter

Total

Percent

 

KAAP

 

71

71

24%

 

Whole Rye

 

4

4

1%

 

Bolted Upinngil Tier 1

226

 

226

75%

 

Water

149

50

199

66%

 

Salt

5

 

5

1.7%

 

Starter

125

 

 

25%

 

 

 

 

505

 

 

Factor

0.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final

Starter

Total

Percent

 

KAAP

 

71

71

22%

 

WR

 

4

4

1%

 

Bolted Upinngil Tier 2

226

 

226

69%

 

Med Rye

25

 

25

8%

 

Water

182

50

232

71%

 

Salt

7

 

7

2.1%

 

Starter

125

 

 

23%

 

 

 

 

565

 

 

Factor

0.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I mixed the first dough for 10 minutes, and the second for 20.    It was necessary to add a bit of medium rye to the second dough to make it adhere.   I was very worried about over fermenting and proofing these loaves so I erred on the side of under-doing it.    I fermented the first loaf for 2 hours, and the second for 1.5 hours, both with two stretch and folds.   Then proofed each of them for only 45 minutes.   They were baked together at 450F with steam for 20 minutes, and without for 25.  

Note:   Bolting is an old (say 17th century) method of refining flour by passing milled wheat through successively finer and finer cloth mesh tubes.   See for instance http://www.angelfire.com/journal/millbuilder/boulting.html%C2%A0%C2%A0   So technically I have done a hybrid of metal sifting and cloth bolting, as I only have one cloth mesh size.  

[Addendum:  For those of you who think that milling, sifting, and now bolting is too messy, please note that only 13g of flour was missing in action.    I'm sure it will be all cleaned up in the fullness of time. ] 

 

Justkneadit's picture

Advice on milling my own flour

November 2, 2012 - 9:00am -- Justkneadit
Forums: 

When I return from this dismal country I would like to begin milling my own flour to bake my loaves. I have zero knowledge of milling and am humbly requesting the knowledge of my fellow TFLer's to point me in the right direction as far as books to read or videos to watch, or even what brand would be good to start out with.

Apart from growing the wheat myself, a feat I will soon accomplish once I have land, it would be a great accomplishment to nearly make a loaf of bread from scratch.

Thanks everyone!

Lane

varda's picture

How to sift home milled wheat to get high extraction flour

November 1, 2012 - 9:42am -- varda

Hi,   I recently got a home mill and would like to learn how to make a high extraction flour.    I see references to a bwraith blog post on the subject but can't seem to find it.    Does anyone either know where it is or could give me tips on how to go about milling and sifting to get say an 85% extraction flour?    I am starting with hard red winter wheat.   Thanks!   -Varda

dabrownman's picture

Tempe Man Revives Heritage Grains and Milling in Tempe - A wonderful story

July 23, 2012 - 11:32am -- dabrownman
Forums: 

In yesterdays Arizona Republic there was a great story about a Tempe man who has revived growing heritage AZ grain, milling them and selling the the flour to the best Pizza maker in the country, Chris Bianco owner and chef at Bianco's and other local chefs and bread makers whiloe reviving the Haden Flour Mill name that gave Tempe's main drag its name - Mill Avenue.  Who knew?

John K.'s picture

Best Mill for Milling Soft Wheat

June 19, 2012 - 9:18am -- John K.

I am interested in purchasing a home mill for milling wheat, but I am particularly interested in purchasing a mill that will mill not only hard wheat but also soft wheat. From looking around on the internet, it appears that hand-cranked mills, even the Diamant, are not really suited to milling soft wheat, which apparently tends to clog them. I suppose that leaves me with electric mills? If so, will some electric mills mill soft wheat and some won't? Any recommendations?

MNBäcker's picture

Brown rice flour...?

April 19, 2012 - 11:58am -- MNBäcker

Hi again.

So, since it looks like I need some rice flour to rub into and dust over my "couche material", I'm wondering if I can just mill some brown rice I have in the cupboard? Or should I either buy some white rice and mill that, or buy milled rice flour outright? I have a Nutrimill that I'm sure would be up to handling the job.

Thanks in advance,

Stephan

http://www.firebrickbread.com

MNBäcker's picture

Nutrimill dust problem

November 18, 2011 - 10:24am -- MNBäcker

Alright, so I've used my Nutrimill for about a year now. Lately I have noticed that it's been "leaking" flour when milling grains. When I mill my Red Hard Spring Wheat berries, there's just a little that blows out the left front. But, when I mill Rye berries for my sourdough, there's actually a continuous stream of flour dust that gets blown into the air...!

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