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ananda


This is very much my take on Eric's formula.   I don't like dried onions, but I love fried onions.   I used my liquid rye sourdough, and it ended up as 30% pre-fermented flour.   There is no added baker's yeast, and the hydration is 70%.   I used an Organic white bread flour in the final dough.   Here is the formula:

Eric’s Favourite Rye

 

Rye Sour Refreshment

Day/date

Time

Sour [g]

Flour [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

Temp °C

Thurs 22 November

08:00

40

150

250

440

28°C

Thurs 22 November

13:00

440

1350

2250

4040

28°C

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye

30

1500

Water

50

2500

TOTAL

80

4000

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [above]

80

4000

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

70

3500

Caraway Seeds

0.6

30

Salt

1.8

90

Fried Onions

7

350

Water

20

1000

TOTAL

179.4

8970

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

70

-

% wholegrain flour

30

-

Factor

-

50

 

Method:

  • Build the sour according to the schedule.
  • Chop and fry the onions in olive oil and allow to cool
  • Combine all the materials for mixing, and use a hook attachment, mixing on first speed for 3 minutes.   Scrape down the bowl and mix a further 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 28°C
  • Ferment in bulk for 2½ hours, with 3 S&F, every half hour.
  • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest covered for 15 minutes.
  • Final shape and proof 1½ hours.   Use couche or bannetons
  • Score tops and bake in wood-fired ovens
  • Brush with Corn Starch Glaze.   Cool on wires

I've also been making lots of mince pies, and a rather nice Banana Bread flavoured with vanilla, fruit and nuts too.

Some photos:

For an all-round great guy

Best wishes

Andy

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ananda

White Levain; Moscow Rye; Stollen Slice

The long-awaited delivery of logs arrived on Sunday, so I re-fired the oven on Monday to get some heat into the brickwork, then fired again yesterday and set-to early on a full day of production.   My new delivery of flour only arrived late on yesterday, so I had to make Gilchesters’ White breads, as opposed to my more favoured Farmhouse loaves.   By close of play I had 14 white loaves [2 @ 1200g, 4 @ 800g and 8 @ 600g finished weight], plus 8 Moscow Rye @ 800g and 2 slices of Stollen yielding 36 finger pieces in total.

Here are the formulae:

  1. 1.    Gilchesters’ White Levain

Wheat Levain Refreshment:

Day/Date

Time

Levain

Bread Flour

Water

Total

Temp °C

Monday 19 November

06:00

40

300

180

520

20

Monday 19 November

11:00

520

500

300

1320

20

Monday 19 November

16:00

1320

500

300

2120

18

Monday 19 November

20:00

2120

1275

765

4160

18

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

35

2520

Water

21

1512

TOTAL

56

4032

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1 above]

56

4032

Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

65

4680

Salt

1.6

116

Water

47

3384

TOTAL

169.6

12212

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

35

-

% overall  hydration

68

-

FACTOR

-

72

 

Method:

  • Build leaven as described.   Ferment the leaven for 1 hour ambient after the last refreshment, then leave overnight in the chiller.
  • In the morning take the leaven out of the fridge first thing.   Make an autolyse with the flour and water for the final dough with DDT 28°C, and leave covered for one hour.
  • To mix the final dough, divide the leaven and the autolyse into 2 and mix 2 separate mixes in a 20 quart machine with the dough hook.   Use the delayed salt method, adding the salt after 7 minutes of mixing on first speed.   Scrape down, add the salt, then mix a further 8 minutes on first speed.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours.   Stretch and fold after 1½ hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare bannetons.   Re-mould and put into bannetons.
  • Final proof 2 hours.   Tip each loaf out onto the peel and score the top.   Bake in a wood-fired brick oven.
  • Cool on wires.

There is a sequence of photographs below which cover most of the process.

 

Autolyse, above

Ripened levain, above

White dough off the mixer, above

White dough after 2 hours bulk fermentation, above

Same dough after Stretch and fold, above

14 dough pieces, pre-shaped, upside down and resting, above

Final Shape, above

Scored and ready to load to the oven, above

Baked Miche, above

A basketful!

2.    Moscow Rye

I have posted the formula for this on my blog many times.   I made 7600g of Paste.

 3.    Stollen Slice

This is baked as a tray-baked slice with a layer of marzipan through the middle, then cut into fingers, as opposed to baking as individual loaves.   I used a “ferment and dough” method; the end-product was really special.   This is the formula and recipe to make 2 slabs:

 

 

 

Method: FERMENT AND DOUGH

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Ferment

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

30

240

Water @ 38°C

46

368

Yeast

7

56

Sugar

5

40

TOTAL

88

704

2.Final Dough

 

 

Ferment

88

704

Strong White Bread Flour

70

560

Milk Powder

5

40

Salt

1

8

Sugar

5

40

Butter

20

160

Eggs

10

80

Spice: Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Cardemom

2

16

Sub-total

201

1608

Sultanas

37.5

300

Raisins

5.6

45

Glacé Cherries

25

200

Mixed Peel [90% fruit on flour]

21.9

175

TOTAL

291

2328

 

 

 

Raw Almond Paste

 

 

Ground Almonds

32

256

Golden Caster Sugar

32

256

Egg

6

48

TOTAL

70

560

 

Oven profile: bake in a convection oven at 160°C for 40 minutes, or in the wood-fired oven as it begins to drop from baking lots of bread.

 Method:
  • Whisk all the ingredients for the ferment together in a steel bowl.
  • Cover with cling film and set in a warm place for half an hour.
  • Mix all the ingredients, except the fruit and the marzipan, together with the ferment in an upright machine with a hook; 2 minutes on first speed and 6 minutes on 3rd speed.   DDT 28°C.
  • Rest for 15 minutes, then cut the fruit into the dough with a scotch cutter.
  • Bulk proof 20 – 30 minutes.
  • Scale and divide into 4 x 580g pieces; mould round and rest 15 minutes.
  • Line 2 small baking sheets with silicone paper.   Pin out each dough pieces to a rectangle the size of the baking sheet.   Place one dough piece on the base of each baking sheet.   Top this with a thin layer of raw almond paste, then place the second dough piece on top of this to make a sandwich.   Brush each top with egg, and scatter 100g of flaked almonds on each slab as a topping.
  • Final proof 50 – 60 minutes.
  • Bake as oven profile.
  • Baste with a layer of melted butter, then dust with icing sugar.   Allow to cool and repeat.   Allow to cool completely on wires, then dust once more with icing sugar.
  • Cut each slab into 18 fingers for serving.

 

A couple of photographs to complete the post

 

I am offering some of these items for sale in our local village hall on Saturday morning.   I will now be adding Eric’s Favourite Rye to the offering.   So, I’ll be baking again on Friday, and would like to encourage others on TFL to join with Floyd and myself over the weekend; bake for Eric.

 

Very best wishes

Andy

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ananda

New Breads from Old Favourite Flours

Our next-door neighbours recently took a daytrip to my old stomping ground across the North Pennines in Cumbria.   They very kindly sent a text message to me wondering if I might want any flour, as they ended up at the Watermill at Little Salkeld: http://organicmill.co.uk/http://organicmill.co.uk/

In the late 1980s and early 1990s when I baked at the Red Herring Workers’ Co-operative, we used flour from the Watermill, exclusively; organically grown wheat, usually biodynamic Demeter standard, grown in the North of England, and stone-milled using water power…unique!

My choices of flour?

The Miller’s Magic is a flour which was introduced shortly after the mill began to produce Unbleached White Flour using a traditional bolting method.   The last and finest of the sieves produces what are known as the “Middlings”, extracted from the outer portion of the endosperm of the wheat grain.   Maslin flour is a blend of rye flour with “middlings”, which produces flour which is a little grey, reasonably finely ground, and somewhat stronger than might be expected.   And this is a by-product, remember!

My Hexham venture with Nigel; http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27794/development-day-work-nigel-13th-march-2012  includes a loaf made with Golden Linseed and Light Rye Flour.   I decided to use the Miller’s Magic flour to produce a similar type of loaf, using a wheat levain and a cold soaker with the flaxseed blond.

A few customers ask for Spelt Bread.   I like to use Spelt, and made a lot of it at the Village Bakery in the late 1990s; it was marketed as “Hadrian Bread”, named after the Roman Emperor in charge at the time the Romans occupied Britain, when Spelt was the most common wheat crop.   Even more appropriately, Hadrian’s Wall lies only a few miles from this North Pennine bakery.   My main problem with spelt is that it costs a lot of money.   This is because it is difficult to mill, as the outer husk is attached to the grain, and, because yield is very poor when compared to more modern wheat varieties.   This did not put me off asking for Biodynamic Spelt Flour.   And I made a variation of the Hadrian Bread too.   It uses my regular wheat leaven, plus a “Raisin Must”.   Honey seems to be a ubiquitous “sweetener” found in Spelt breads.   This alternative is a hot soaker of raisins which is blitzed to a fine purée to add to the final dough.

Both formulae are given below, along with a few photographs.

I am now looking forward to offering tastings of these loaves to local people as part of the next stage of the business development plan.

I made a couple of old favourites to justify firing up the brick oven
The Millers’ Magic: Maslin Flour and a Golden Linseed Soaker

Wheat Levain build

Day/Date

Time

Stock

Flour

Water

TOTAL

Temp °C

Tuesday 13 November

10:00

40

200

120

360

21

Tuesday 13 November

17:00

360

500

300

1160

21

Tuesday 13 November

22:00

1160

1100

660

2920

18

 

Final Paste

Material/Stage

Formula

[% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. White Leaven-refreshed

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

630

Water

18

378

TOTAL

48

1008

 

 

 

1b. Cold Soaker

 

 

Organic Golden Linseeds

10

210

Water

30

630

TOTAL

40

840

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven from 1a

48

1008

Soaker from 1b

40

840

Watermill Organic Maslin Flour

70

1470

Salt

2

42

Water

25 - 30

525 - 630

TOTAL

185 – 190

3885 - 3990

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

 

% hydration

73 - 78

 

FACTOR

-

21

 

Method:

    • Build the leaven as schedule and prepare soaker the night before.
    • Combine all the ingredients in the mixer using a hook attachment.   Mix 10 - 15 minutes on first speed, scraping down the bowl as required.   DDT 26°C.
    • Bulk ferment 2½ - 3 hours
    • Scale, divide and pre-shape.   Rest covered 15 minutes; prepare bannetons.
    • Final shape; final proof 1½ - 2 hours.
    • Score top and bake in wood-fired oven
    • Cool on wires

Dinkel Bread with Levain

Material/Stage

Formula

[% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. White Leaven-refreshed

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

630

Water

18

378

TOTAL

48

1008

 

 

 

1b. “Raisin Must”

 

 

Californian Raisins

8

168

Hot Water

8

168

TOTAL

16

336

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven from 1a

48

1008

“Raisin Must” from 1b

16

336

Watermill Organic Wholemeal Spelt

70

1470

Salt

1.8

38

Water

40

840

TOTAL

175.8

3692

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

 

% hydration

66

 

FACTOR

-

21

 

Method:

    • Prepare the leaven as schedule.   Soak the raisins in the hot water overnight.
    • Blitz the raisins and water to a must.   Combine all the ingredients with the leaven and must in a mixing bowl with a hook attachment.   Mix on first speed for 15 minutes, scraping down the bowl as required.   DDT 27°C.

    • Bulk proof 2 hours
    • Scale, divide and mould
    • Final proof 1 - 2 hours
    • Score the tops and bake in wood-fired ovens
    • Cool on wires

 Campagne with Rye Sourdough and Wheat Levain

 

Material/Stage

Formula

[% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a Wheat Levain

60% hydration

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

400

Water

15

240

TOTAL

40

640

 

 

 

1b Rye Sourdough

167% hydration

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

3

48

Water

5

80

TOTAL

8

128

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

40

640

Rye Sourdough [from 1b]

8

128

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

50

800

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

22

352

Salt

1.5

24

Water

49

784

TOTAL

170.5

2728

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

28

-

% overall hydration

69

-

% wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

-

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Method:

    • Prepare the levains as schedule.   Make an “autolyse” with final dough flour and water plus the rye sourdough
    • Combine wheat levain and autolyse in the mixer on first speed for 5 minutes.   Add the salt, mix 2 minutes on first and 3 minutes on second speed.
    • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
    • Scale and divide; mould round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare large bannetons.   Re-mould and set for final proof in bannetons.
    • Final proof 1½ hours.   Pre-heat oven.
    • Tip onto peel, Bake in wood-fired oven
    • Cool on wires.

Moscow Rye Bread

 

Rye Sour Refreshment

Day/date

Time

Sour [g]

Flour [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

Temp °C

Monday 12 November

19:00

40

300

500

840

30

Tuesday 13 November

13:00

840

720

1200

2660

29

 

Final Paste

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

930

Water

50

1550

TOTAL

80

2480

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

13

403

Red Rye Malt

7

217

Blackstrap Molasses

1

31

Caraway Seeds

0.1

3

Boiling Water

35

1085

TOTAL

56.1

1739

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2480

“Scald” [from 1b]

56.1

1739

TOTAL

136.1

4219

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

136.1

4219

Shipton Mill Organic Light Rye Flour

50

1550

Salt

1.2

37

TOTAL

187.3

5806

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 + 50[997]

-

FACTOR

-

31

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   combine the caraway and the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 28°C.
  • Scale and divide, shape and place in bread pans prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off the top and attach lids.
  • Final proof for 1 hour at 28°C, then bake.
  • Bake in the dead wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

Ok, I’m off to make a croissant dough to retard overnight, plus rolling out the butter, and, an overnight biga for some bread rolls.   I need another delivery of wood…very soon!

Happy Baking everyone!

Andy

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ananda

Alnwick Food Festival

22nd and 23rd September 2012

I spent much of last week baking and preparing myself for the challenges and opportunities opening up from this local food festival, now in its 8th year; http://www.alnwickfoodfestival.co.uk

All this began back in January when I first saw a tweet asking if anyone was interested in demonstrating/talking at the food festival.   I made immediate contact, and Karen, who co-ordinates the event came to see me later that week.   I contacted my colleague, Ann, from “Dough Works”; http://www.doughworks.co.uk  and she agreed to work with me in partnership for the event.   We prepared a presentation where I would talk and she would demonstrate, and we also agreed to share a stall to sell our bread and other baked lovelies over the weekend.   The stall was given to us free resulting from us agreeing to present; an excellent deal to me!

Last week I began baking in the sunshine at home and made some lovely Sourdough Seed Breads and Five Grain Levains, which looked like this:

After that I had a successful baking day with my friend Nigel, using his large wood-fired oven at his home in Ryton, near Newcastle.   On Friday, Nigel spent a second day baking, and I trundled into Alnwick to the Farmers’ Market.   The day began with lots of heavy showers, and ended up being a wash-out.   However, the sun came out later, and the weather became very settled, just in time for the big event at the weekend.

My parents had come to visit, and my Dad had put up some great shelves in the kitchen, greatly improving storage for my bakery ingredients.   However, it meant a few difficulties coping with loading up the car from the kitchen; it all came good in the end.

Over the two day event I sold all but 4 of the 200 loaves baked for the event by Nigel, and/or me; we also sold nearly all of the breads and other lovely treats which Ann made as well.   The sun shone, and there was some great food offered throughout the market square for the many visitors to enjoy.   When Alison and my parents arrived in town there was no parking to be found in the town centre; they had to park some way off and walk in; so it brought a lot of business into the town; much needed, of course!

Here are a couple of pictures of the stall, including one with Jean-Christophe Novelli, a Michelin-starred Chef in the UK, and the chief attraction of the event.   He did long demonstrations on both Saturday and Sunday, as well as preparing and serving a buffet in Alnwick Castle on the Saturday evening.

Our Saturday talk and demonstration went off very well; the firm which provided camera and pa systems were first class, and it was a pleasure to take to the stage and talk, aware that the audience of at least 200 people could easily hear everything I said, and were able to see clearly what Ann and I were upto on stage, and see the PowerPoint presentation summarising the aim of the session, and the key points I was pulling out.   Here are a few photos of the talk as it progressed.   There are more photographs on flickr, here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/24731237@N03/sets/72157631611934276/

There has been lots of favourable publicity from the event; loads of tweets going out, and good press coverage too.   Everyone has worked so hard; a particularly big thank you to Karen, but also to everyone else involved in any way, as the whole event was so well-organised.

I’m going to be absent from TFL throughout October.   Work on the Dissertation has not progressed how I had hoped, and so I need to “go to ground” if I am going to get it finished in time.   I’ll be back in November, and hoping to break into lots of new territory to drive my business forward…and hopefully spend my time baking lovely bread.

Meantime, all good wishes

Andy

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ananda

Hello All,

I began writing this account travelling back to the UK, as follows:

Monday 21st August 2012; 14:32, UK time.

 

As I start to write up this blog entry, Alison and I are sitting inside a somewhat cold steel tube, high up in the sky, somewhere over France, on our return to the UK.   We have just spent 2 weeks on the lovely Greek island of Paxos, enjoying a wonderful holiday together and basking in temperatures into the high 30s, with permanent daytime sunshine.   We believe we will be returning to the ubiquitous showers which we left behind, and which have constantly afflicted most of the UK all Summer-long, thus far.

 

At this time, I fear there could be some delay to my being able to post this entry for you all to read on the Fresh Loaf.   Our Broadband Router had failed on the day of Codruta’s departure and the day before we left for Greece.   I expect I will have to wait a few days for BT to send out a replacement device, so we can once again re-connect with the internet.   Certainly our time on Paxos has kept me away from the worldwide web.   I have just about managed to keep an eye on incoming e-mail, but not been able to reply to any.   The dongle provided for me by Vodafone is a complete waste of time; I had more success with my very ordinary mobile phone accessing the internet, most of the time.   Ho hum!

 

Side note, added later: Now back home in Ananda, and the Broadband is working fine; excellent!

 

Still, this post is meant to be positive, indeed celebratory, so enough of the negativity.   Alison and I greatly enjoyed the company of Codruta for a week of relatively intense baking…and she even brought sunny weather for us to enjoy for the first time properly since March!   Here is my account of our baking activities and other matters during Codruta’s visit back at the very beginning of August.

 

I met Codruta at the airport late on the Monday evening, having completed all the final plans for our baking activities leading to the Powburn Show, over that weekend, then fired my oven in preparation on the Monday, as well as building leavens, sourdoughs and other pre-ferments.

 

I rose early on Tuesday to fire the oven once again, with Codruta joining me soon after so we could begin to mix the 3 doughs for that day’s production, and enjoy fruit and coffee for breakfast before my bakery kitchen became too overwhelmed by dough matters!   The first day we made Five Grain Levains, which is a Hamelman formula, moreorless but without the addition of bakers’ yeast; some Wholemeal Bloomers and some brown tinned loaves, both of which utilise a biga.   Recipes and formulae for these products are included below, although I have not included detail of the levain and sour builds:

 

  1. Five Grain Levain.

Yield: 8 loaves scaled @ 700g and 3 loaves scaled @ 960g

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

900

Water

15

540

TOTAL

40

1440

 

 

 

1b. Hot Soaker

 

 

Organic Flaked Rye

10

360

Flaxseed Blond

10

360

Organic Sunflower Seeds

7.5

270

Pinhead Oatmeal

7.5

270

Salt

0.67

24

Boiling Water

41

1476

TOTAL

76.67

2760

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Levain [from 1a]

40

1440

Hot Soaker [from 1b]

76.67

2760

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

50

1800

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

900

Salt

1.5

54

Water

44

1584

TOTAL

237.17

8538

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

98 [on flour]

72.6 [on flour + grain]

% wholegrain

25 [on flour]

40.74 [on flour + grain]

FACTOR

-

36

 

 

2. Wholemeal Bloomers

Yield: 8 loaves scaled @ 1030g.

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Overnight Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

1200

Water

15

720

Fresh Yeast

0.2

9

TOTAL

40.2

1929

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Overnight Sponge [from 1]

40.2

1929

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

75

3600

Fresh Yeast

1.52

73

Salt

1.52

73

Water

56

2688

TOTAL

174.24

8363

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

71

-

% wholegrain flour

75

-

FACTOR

-

48

 

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the night before and leave covered to ferment.
  • Calculate water temperature needed for DDT of 28°C.   Combine Water and Wholemeal in the mixer, then autolyse for one hour.
  • Add the Salt, Fresh Yeast and Sponge and mix in an upright mixer with the hook attachment for 3 minutes on first speed and 6 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down as necessary during mixing.
  • Bulk proof, maintaining the dough temperature @ 25°C for 2 - 3 hours with S&F after 1 hour, and 2 if needed.
  • Scale and divide. Mould, pre-shape and final shape.
  • Final proof @ 25°C for 1 hour
  • Bake in the wood-fired oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

3. Tinned Brown Bread

Yield: 7 loaves scaled @ 600g; 1 Pullman Pan @ 1100g and 1 small loaf with the remainder

Biga

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

50

1650

Fresh Yeast

0.18

6

Water

30

990

TOTAL

80.18

2646

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Biga [as above]

80.18

2646

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

50

1650

Salt

1.8

60

Shortening

1.8

60

Yeast

1.8

60

Water @ 23°C

38

1254

TOTAL

173.6

5730

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

50

-

% overall hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

50 [85% extraction]

-

FACTOR

-

33

 

Method:

 

  • Mix biga with all other materials to form a strong dough: 3 minutes first speed, 5 – 6 minutes on second speed.
  • Bulk proof 1½ hours.
  • Scale and divide.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and place in ready-greased loaf tins.
  • Final Proof for 1 – 1½ hours.
  • Bake in wood-fired ovens.
  • Cool on wires

 

These are the photographs from our first two days of production.   All of the photographs have been taken on Codruta’s very fine camera, by someone with far greater photography skills than I possess.   I am very grateful to Codruta for giving me full access to the photographs she has taken.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDzTyngIFH0

As we worked away through our first days of production, I realised how much time Codruta devotes to social networking, sharing her baking activities and keeping up with so many other fine fellow-practitioners.   Alison quickly realised that maybe, I am not quite such an obsessive as she had previously believed!   Codruta posted photographs of the oven and of the breads as they emerged baked, straight on to her Facebook account.   I was amazed as she told me just how many people were following our activities and contributing either by making comments on the photos, or listing them as “favourites”.   The numbers kept on rising throughout the 4 days of baking too.

 

We managed to finish baking in good time on the first day; 27 loaves from 3 different doughs.   Since 2 of these used bakers’ yeast, and the oven had benefitted from firing the day before, Alison encouraged us to get out into the sunshine and enjoy the lovely Northumberland countryside on our doorstep.   We took a short drive, around 5km, to the head of the Ingram Valley to enjoy a lovely walk to Linhope Spout waterfall.   The following 2 slideshows give great account of our walk.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9RfzZ7Znw8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGuger-A4Ys

The following 3 days were taken up entirely with baking.   Whilst Wednesday’s production was similar in some ways to the previous day, we had 2 large batches of sour-dough based breads to make, and we had to prepare large amounts of levain, rye sourdough, biga, etc. to take to Leeds the next day.  We made 29 loaves altogether, 3 different doughs, as shown below:

 

4. Roasted Brazil Nut and Prune Bread

Yields 8 loaves scaled @ 490g

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

400

Water

12

240

Fresh Yeast

0.2

4

TOTAL

32.2

644

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Biga [from 1]

32.2

644

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

55

1100

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

500

Butter

5

100

Salt

1.6

32

Fresh Yeast

1.3

26

Water

56

1120

Soft Prunes

12.5

250

Brazil Nuts - toasted and chopped

12.5

250

TOTAL

201.1

4022

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

-

20

 

Method:

  • Prepare the Biga the night before.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the mixer except the fruit and nuts.   Mix on first speed until clear, scraping down as needed.   Mix for 6 minutes on second speed with the hook attachment.   Rest the dough for 20 minutes then add the fruit and nuts and mix to clear using a Scotch cutter.   DDT 28°C.
  • Bulk Ferment 1½ hours.
  • Scale and divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes then shape as bloomers.   Glaze with beaten egg.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.
  • Score the tops of the loaves with 3 diagonal cuts and bake in a pre-heated deck oven at 180°C with steam for 45 - 50 minutes.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

5. Sourdough Seed Bread

 

Yield: 8 loaves @ 700g and 3 loaves @ 1000g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

840

Water

12

504

TOTAL

32

1344

 

 

 

1b. Soaker

 

 

Organic Flax Seed Blond

7

294

Cold Water

21

882

TOTAL

28

1176

 

 

 

1c. Tamari-Roasted Seeds

 

 

Organic Sunflower Seeds

6

252

Organic Pumpkin Seeds

6

252

Organic Sesame Seeds

6

252

Organic Tamari Soy Sauce

-

-

TOTAL

18

756

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

32

1344

Soaker [from 1b]

28

1176

Tamari Roasted Seeds [from 1c]

18

756

     

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

1260

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

50

2100

Water

45

1890

Salt

1.79

75

TOTAL

204.79

8601

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

78 on flour

63seeds + flour

% wholegrain flour

50

-

FACTOR

-

42

 

Method:

  • Build the levain from stock.   Prepare the soaker the night before.   Roast the seeds ahead of time to allow them to cool before adding to the dough.
  • In the mixer, combine the flour with the water and soaker and mix 3 minutes on first speed, scraping down to clear.   Autolyse for 1 hour.
  • Add the salt and levain and mix 3 minutes on first speed and 5 minutes on second speed, scraping down as needed.   Add the roasted seeds and mix on first speed to clear.   DDT 28°C.
  • Prove in bulk for 2½ hours; stretch and fold after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare bannetons.   Re-mould.
  • Final proof 2 hours
  • Bake in the wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

6. Caraway Rye with Blackstrap Molasses

 

Yield: 2 Miche @ 1350g, 4 loaves @ 960g, 4 loaves @ 700g; all scaling weights

Materials/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

25

1325

Water

41

2173

TOTAL

66

3498

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

66

3498

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

75

3975

Salt

1.8

95

Caraway Seeds

1.2

64

Black Strap Molasses

8

424

Water @ 40°C

26

1378

TOTAL

178

9434

 

 

 

% Pre-fermented flour

25

-

% Overall hydration

64.8

-

% Wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

 

53

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as above.
  • Dissolve the molasses into the warm water.   Add the sourdough, seeds and salt, and then add the flour.   Use an upright mixer with hook attachment, and mix for 12 – 15 minutes on first speed only.   Scrape down the bowl as needed.   DDT 25°C.
  • Bulk ferment 2 hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould and rest 15 minutes, covered.   Re-mould dough pieces and place in prepared bannetons.
  • Final proof 2½ hours.
  • Tip out onto a dusted peel and score a diamond pattern on the top of the loaf.   Bake in a wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

We made a very early start the next morning, and managed to park up at the loading bay at Leeds City College, Thomas Danby Campus at exactly 08:00, as planned, after a rapid journey over 130 miles/210km in not much over 2 hours.   Codruta slept some of this time, but we also planned what we needed to do immediately on arrival to set up the secondary fermentation process for all 3 rye breads we wanted to make, by mixing scalds and sponges.   After that it was a quick breakfast and into full production.

 

Our time at Leeds was agreed and arranged with my long-time friend and colleague, Joe Cavalier, who manages all the Bakery provision at the College.   We set the 2 days up so that some of his key teaching staff were able to work alongside Codruta and I, and thus gain important CPD [professional development], with specialist dough work aplenty on offer.   Over the next 2 days, we made 3 types of Rye Bread [100% rye], 3 leavened breads in bannetons [2 with Gilchesters’ flours and one with a Type 80 Farine Biologique which Codruta’s Sister-in-Law had very kindly posted to me from Paris]; AND, we made Chollah, Spicy Buns, Laminated Pastries, plus Ciabattas and Focaccias.

Day One went by like a dream, and we drove east to visit my parents, near Bridlington, for an all-too-brief, but very enjoyable and comfortable overnight stop.   Day Two proved to be more challenging for a number of reasons; however, this is all part of working life within the bakery, and I wanted Codruta to experience as much as possible during her time in the UK.   Codruta has a great temperament; she is relaxed, yet totally hard working and dedicated.   I know her bakery will be a great success when she finds a venue and begins production; it was a joy to have her to visit us, and I truly hope she learned all she hoped to when she first asked to come over.

 

Here is the detail on what we produced at Leeds; and a massive thanks to Joe and his teaching colleagues for making this happen, and for all the enthusiasm and expertise given during our time at the College; very much appreciated.

 

 

7. Gilchesters’ Farmhouse/Miche

30kg dough scaled off as loaves of 1350g, 950g and 700g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

4375

Water

15

2625

TOTAL

40

7000

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

40

7000

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

13125

Salt

1.6

280

Water

58

10150

TOTAL

174.6

30555

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

73

-

% wholegrain flour [approx 85% extraction]

75

-

FACTOR

 

175

 

Method:

  • Build leaven as schedule.
  • Using a Spiral Mixer, combine the Farmhouse flour and water for 3 minutes on first speed, then autolyse for 1 hour.   Add leaven to Autolyse and mix for 5 minutes on first speed.   Add the salt and mix a further 4 – 7 minutes on first speed.   Scrape down the bowl as necessary.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk proof 2½ hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes, covered, and prepare the bannetons.   Re-mould dough pieces and place upside down in bannetons.
  • Final proof 2 – 3 hours.
  • Score top with an “A” and bake on the sole of a deck oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

8. Gilchesters’ White Levain

 

17kg dough scaled off as loaves of 1350g, 950g and 700g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

35

3500

Water

21

2100

TOTAL

56

5600

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1 above]

56

5600

Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

65

6500

Salt

1.6

160

Water

47

4700

TOTAL

169.6

16960

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

35

-

% overall  hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

-

-

FACTOR

-

100

 

Method:

  • Build leaven as described.
  • Combine all the final dough materials in a spiral mixer on first speed for 3 minutes, scraping down the bowl and rotating as necessary.   Mix a further 5 minutes on second speed to develop the dough.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare bannetons.   Re-mould and put into bannetons.   Retard overnight.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.
  • Tip each loaf out onto the peel and score the top.   Bake on the sole of a deck oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

9. Pain de Campagne with Wheat Levain and Rye Sourdough

 

14kg dough scaled off as loaves of 1350g, 950g and 700g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a Wheat Levain

60% hydration

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

28

2333

Water

16.8

1400

TOTAL

44.8

3733

 

 

 

1b Rye Sourdough

167% hydration

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

2

167

Water

3.3

275

TOTAL

5.3

442

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

44.8

3733

Rye Sourdough [from 1b]

5.3

442

T80 Biologique

60

5000

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse

10

833

Salt

1.5

125

Water

50

4165

TOTAL

171.6

14298

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

69

-

% wholegrain flour

11.6

-

FACTOR

-

83.3

 

Method:

  • Prepare the levains as schedule.   Make an “autolyse” with final dough flour and water plus the rye sourdough
  • Combine wheat levain and autolyse in the mixer on first speed for 5 minutes.   Add the salt, mix 2 minutes on first and 3 minutes on second speed.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale and divide; mould round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare large bannetons.   Re-mould and set for final proof in bannetons.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.   Pre-heat oven.
  • Tip onto peel, Bake in deck oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

10. Moscow Rye Bread

6 panned loaves

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

960

Water

50

1600

TOTAL

80

2560

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

13

416

Red Rye Malt

7

224

Blackstrap Molasses

1

32

Caraway Seeds

0.1

3

Boiling Water

35

1120

TOTAL

56.1

1795

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2560

“Scald” [from 1b]

56.1

1795

TOTAL

136.1

4355

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

136.1

4355

Shipton Mill Organic Light Rye Flour

50

1600

Salt

1.25

40

TOTAL

187.35

5995

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 + 50[997]

-

FACTOR

-

32

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   combine the caraway and the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 28°C.
  • Scale and divide, shape and place in bread pans prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off the top and attach lids.
  • Final proof for just 1 hour at 28°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pans, apply steam, and leave for 10 minutes.   Then turn the oven down to 100°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 6 to 16 hours.   Or bake in the dead wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

11. Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

 

6 panned loaves

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

900

Water

50

1500

TOTAL

80

2400

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

450

Red Rye Malt

5

150

Blackstrap Molasses

6

180

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

30

Boiling Water

35

1050

TOTAL

62

1860

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2400

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

1860

TOTAL

142

4260

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

4260

Shipton Organic Light Rye Flour [997]

50

1500

Salt

1.2

36

TOTAL

193.2

5796

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 [+ 50 type997]

-

FACTOR

-

30

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours @ 35°C.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours with DDT at 28°C.
  • Scale and divide into 6.   Shape and drop into Sandwich Pans, prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds, then apply lids.
  • Final proof for 2 hours at 28°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pans; apply steam, after 10 minutes turn the oven down to 110°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for 6 hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

12. Black Pumpernickel Bread

6 panned loaves

Material

Formula [% of “flour”]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Rye Sour Dough

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

30

900

Water

50

1500

TOTAL

80

2400

 

 

 

1b. “Altus”

 

 

Old Rye Bread

11

330

Hot Water

15

450

Blackstrap Molasses

4

120

TOTAL

30

900

 

 

 

1c. Soaked, Cooked Rye Berries

 

 

Whole Rye Berries

20

600

Water

20

600

TOTAL

40

1200

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2400

“Altus” [from 1b]

30

900

Soaked, Cooked Rye Berries

40

1200

TOTAL

150

4500

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Sponge [from 2]

150

4500

Salt

1.6

48

Rye Flakes

25

750

Light Rye

25

750

TOTAL

201.6

6048

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain

75 [+ 25]

[Light Rye 997]

FACTOR

-        

30

 

Method:

  • Build the sour according to the schedule.   For the “Altus”, dissolve the molasses in the hot water, then soak the bread in the liquor overnight.   Soak the whole rye grain overnight in cold water.   Wash the grain through, and then simmer for 45 minutes.   The cooked grain should have no residual liquid, and it should double in weight from original weighing.
  • To make the “sponge”, combine sourdough, Altus and cooked grains and store, covered, for 4 hours at 35°C.
  • To make the final paste, add salt, light rye flour and chopped rye grains to the sponge.
  • Bulk ferment at 32 - 35°C for 1 hour.
  • Scale and divide into large Pullman Pans and attach lids.
  • Final proof for 1 hour at 35°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 110°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 4½ - 6 hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

In the end it was not possible to bake the loaves overnight.   So we baked them through before going on to East Yorkshire.   I am afraid I rather over baked these loaves as a result!

 

13. Ciabatta/Focaccia

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

1380

Water

18

828

Fresh Yeast

0.2

9

TOTAL

48.2

2217

 

 

 

1b. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

3

138

Water

5

230

TOTAL

8

368

 

 

 

2a. Final Dough – “Bassinage”

 

 

Biga – from 1a above]

48.2

2217

Rye Sourdough – from 1b above]

8

368

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

920

Gilchesters’ Organic Ciabatta Flour

40

1840

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

4

184

Gilchesters’ Organic Coarse Semolina

3

138

Salt

1.78

82

Fresh Yeast

2.72

125

Water

43

1978

TOTAL

170.7

7852

 

 

 

2b Final Dough – super-hydration

 

 

Final Dough – “Bassinage”

170.78

7852

Water

19

874

TOTAL

189.78

8726

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

33

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% “wholegrain”

9

-

FACTOR

-

46

 To make: 12 “Ciabatta” loaves and 2 full sheets of “Rosemary and “Rock Salt Focaccia”

 

14. Spicy Buns

 

48 buns @ 70g each

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe[grams]

1. FERMENT

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

20

240

Caster Sugar

5

60

Fresh Yeast

8

96

Water @ 38°C

45

540

TOTAL

78

936

2. FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Ferment [from above]

78

936

Strong White Bread Flour

80

960

Salt

1

12

Milk Powder

8

96

Butter

15

180

Egg

15

180

Caster Sugar

15

180

Cinnamon

1

12

Nutmeg

1

12

Sultanas

33

396

Raisins

17

204

Mixed Peel

17

204

TOTAL

281

3372

3. STOCK SYRUP

 

 

Caster Sugar

-

150

Water

-

150

 

 

 

FACTOR

-

12

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge [flying ferment]: Weigh out the water, making sure temperature is correct.   Dissolve the yeast into the water.   Add the flour and sugar, and whisk to a smooth batter.   Cover and leave in a warm place for 45 minutes
  • Weigh the other ingredients: blend the flour with the other dry ingredients.   Cut the butter into small pieces and rub roughly through the dry ingredients.   Weigh the egg separately.   Weigh the dried fruit separately.
  • Add the egg and dry ingredients to the risen sponge, and combine to form a soft and strong dough.   Mix for 3 minutes on first speed and 8 minutes on second speed to develop, scraping down the bowl as necessary.
  • Rest the dough for 20 minutes, and then use a metal cutter to cut through the dough and add the fruit.
  • Rest the dough for 40 minutes.   Scale and divide into 70g pieces
  • Mould each dough piece round, and rest covered for 15 minutes.   Prepare 3 baking sheets for the oven.   Pre-heat the oven [180°C, or, 160°C for a fan oven]
  • Re-mould dough pieces and tray-up on baking sheets lined with silicone paper [baking parchment].   Brush the tops of the dough pieces with beaten egg and cover.
  • Final proof in a warm environment for 1½ to 2 hours.
  • Bake for 15 – 20 minutes
  • Glaze with sugar syrup immediately after baking.
  • Cool on wires.

 

15. Chollah; 6 and 8 Strand Plaits

 

4 of each

 

MATERIAL

% OF FLOUR

GRAMS

1. FERMENT

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

20

800

Water @ 38°C

32

1280

Fresh Yeast

8

320

Sugar

5

200

TOTAL

65

2600

2.FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Ferment

65

2600

Strong White Bread Flour

80

3200

Milk Powder

5

200

Salt

1

40

Sugar

5

200

Butter

10

400

Eggs

28

1120

TOTAL

194

7760

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oven profile: bake in the deck oven at 175°C, top heat 6, bottom heat 5 for 28 minutes.   No steam, draw the damper for the last 5 minutes

 

Method:

  • Whisk all the ingredients for the ferment together in a steel bowl.
  • Cover with cling film and set in a warm place for half an hour.
  • Mix all the ingredients, together with the ferment, in an upright machine with a hook; 2 minutes on first speed, then scrape down; 6 minutes on 3rd speed.   A spiral mixer is a good alternative.
  • Rest, covered, for 15 minutes, then scale into 970g pieces and divide each into 2, 3, 4, 5,  6, 7, or 8 equal sized pieces, depending on the number of strands in your plait.   Try to avoid using any flour on the bench during this and subsequent stages.
  • Mould round, cover and rest 5 minutes.
  • Line trays with silicone paper.   Roll out strands to 11” and plait according to instructions.
  • Double brush with beaten egg.   Top with poppy seeds.  Set to prove.
  • Prove 50 – 60 minutes at 35 - 40°C, 85%rH.
  • Bake as oven profile.
  • Cool on wires.

 

16. Croissant Dough

We made a selection of Croissants, Pain Amandes, Pain aux Chocolats and some Palmiers.   We made the croissant dough on day one, and refrigerated overnight, laminating the dough to make the final products on day two.

MATERIAL

FORMULA [% OF FLOUR]

RECIPE [GRAMS]

Strong White Flour

100

2400

Salt

1.3

32

Milk Powder

5

120

Yeast

6

144

Cold Water

63

1512

SUB-TOTAL

175.3

4208

Concentrated Butter

41.7

1000

TOTAL

217

5208

 

Method:

  • Mix the ingredients for the dough to form cool, developed dough.
  • Put in a plastic bag in the chiller and retard overnight. Roll out the slab of butter and put back in the chiller.
  • Roll the dough out to a rectangle 8mm thick.   Put the butter slab onto 2/3 of the rectangle, and fold in 3, letter style.
    • Turn the dough piece clockwise through 90°.   Roll out to the same size as before, fold as above, and turn.   Repeat once more.
    • Chill the billet for half an hour and give 2 more folds and half turns as described.   This gives 168 layers of butter in the croissant dough.   Chill again for half an hour.
    • Roll the dough piece out to 5mm and use a croissant cutter to cut out triangle shapes.   Stack into piles of 6 and rest covered for 2-3 minutes.
    • Tease out each triangle, fold up the top edge and roll up tightly.   Roll out the feet to pointed ends and move round so these feet join up to make the classic shape.
    • Place on silicone lined baking sheets and brush with beaten egg.
    • Prove at 38-40°C, 80%rH for 40 minutes.
    • Bake in a hot oven, 235°C for 12-15 minutes

     

     

    This is a longer slideshow covering our baking activities in Leeds.

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVtUz_2I_jY

    We hurried back up north after a completely full-on day to rendezvous with Alison plus her Sister, Beverley, and her daughter, Eve.   They go to Powburn Show every year, with Eve keen to take part in a number of the competitions taking place; including the wrestling!   We went to our nearest good pub, the Tankerville Arms, at Eglingham, for some great food and I enjoyed some fine local ale.

     

    However, I had to rise very early in order to finish off all of the display work and the price list to take to the Show the next day.

     

    The weather was perfect, in contrast to last year.   It took 2 car loads to transport all the bread to the Show, and I had a customer in between deliveries, coming to visit me at home, all the way from Edinburgh.

     

    Our next-door neighbour, Anna, has been a great supporter of the Bread and Roses venture, and she came along as a key part of the day’s sales team….I can’t thank you enough, Anna!

     

    And, we sold a lot of bread and baked goodies on the day.   To finish a very long post, here are some photographs of the stall, and the team in action.

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8D8IT4n_crI

    Thank you so much to all involved: Joe and the Leeds team, my parents, Anna, to Shuffles, Beverley and Eve.   To Alison of course, for her love, and never-ending patience.   And to Codruta; we so enjoyed having you to stay.

     

    My very best wishes to you all

    Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello from Sunny Northumberland [a pleasant but temporary change!]

I drove down to visit my brother, all too briefly, on Tuesday.   He had some wood for me; a lot of wood, very dry and cut in good-sized lengths for my oven!

We filled the car up with all this wood, then he reminded me about a steam-stripper he was looking onto, which he showed me how to turn into a device to use in my bread oven.   So, I brought that back to Powburn too!

Today, in surprise sunshine, I made Gilchesters' Miches, Moscow Rye Breads and Spicy Buns.   A slideshow is below for you to watch.   And, the oven was hot!

Tomorrow, early doors, I am driving to Nigel's house so we can spend the day baking more bread for Hexham.   I am ready to make 26kg of Gilchesters' dough, plus 9kg Moscow Rye.   Nigel will be making around 20kg of White dough, and the same of Linseed and Light Rye.   The weather forecast is dire.   Still, I am optimistic about Saturday's market.   I also have some Croissants and Pain au Chocolats to tempt people with too.

Here is the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DtPm7Nsmu0&feature=youtu.be

Happy Baking!

Andy

ps.   And some crumbshots of the Gilchesters' Miche; so tasty from the heat of the oven!

 

ananda's picture
ananda


Given my flour delivery was put back a week, and the weather has done nothing except rain here in the UK, seemingly incessantly, and forever, my baking schedule has been somewhat interfered with.

So, here are a few loaves I've baked recently.   The Gilchesters' loaves were made today, and I will repeat again tomorrow as I dive into a dissertation on UK Organic Wheat, and prepare for a trip to Dunbar in Southern Scotland to introduce a training programme at a great local Bakery Co-operative


Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

 

Rye Sour build:

Day/Date

Time

Stock

D Rye

Water

TOTAL

Temp °C

Weds 13th June

20:00

40

300

500

840

30

Saturday 16th June

18:30

840

450

750

2040

30

 

Final Paste:

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

750

Water

50

1250

TOTAL

80

2000

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

375

Red Rye Malt

5

125

Blackstrap Molasses

6

150

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

25

Boiling Water

35

875

TOTAL

62

1550

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2000

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

1550

TOTAL

142

3550

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

3550

Shipton Organic Light Rye Flour [997]

50

1250

Salt

1.2

30

TOTAL

193.2

4830

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 [+ 50 type997]

-

FACTOR

-

25

 

 

 

Method:

    • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
    • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours @ 35°C.
    • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
    • Bulk proof for 2 hours with DDT at 28°C.
    • Scale and divide into 5.   Shape and drop into 5 Sandwich Pans, prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds, then apply lids.
    • Final proof for 2 hours at 28°C, then bake.
    • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pans, apply steam, after 10 minutes turn the oven down to 110°C, and move to Convection setting.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for 6 hours.
    • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 This is a video demonstrating how best to scale these loaves, and shape them for the pans.   In years gone by at Village Bakery, a team of 2 bakers would produce 2 x 150kg batches of this type of Rye paste and scale it off in this way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xf36f0Fw0_E&feature=youtu.be

 Roasted Brazil Nut and Prune Bread

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Biga

 

 

Carrs “Special CC” Flour

20

300

Water

12

180

Fresh Yeast

0.2

3

TOTAL

32.2

483

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Biga [from 1]

32.2

483

Carrs “Special CC”Flour

55

825

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

375

Butter

5

75

Salt

1.67

25

Fresh Yeast

1.33

20

Water

56

840

Soft Prunes

12.5

180

Brazil Nuts - toasted and chopped

12.5

180

TOTAL

200.2

3003

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

-

15

 

Method:

    • Prepare the Biga the night before.
    • Combine all the ingredients in the mixer except the fruit and nuts.   Mix on first speed until clear, scraping down as needed.   Mix for 6 minutes on second speed with the hook attachment.   Rest the dough for 20 minutes then add the fruit and nuts and mix to clear using a Scotch cutter.   DDT 28°C.
    • Bulk Ferment 1½ hours.
    • Scale and divide into 3 x 1kg pieces; mould round.   Rest 15 minutes then shape as bloomers.   Glaze with beaten egg.
    • Final proof 1½ hours.
    • Score the tops of the loaves with 4 diagonal cuts and bake in a pre-heated electric oven at 170°C with convection for 55 minutes.
    • Cool on wires.

Both the Borodinsky and the Toasted Brazil Nut and Prune Breads were lovely.   My apologies, the photographs don't really tell the best story.   It seems to be permanently dark in our house at the moment...and it was our longest day very recently too!!

 

 Gilchesters’ Miche

Makes 2 loaves @ 1350g

Levain build:

Day

Time

Stock Levain

White Flour

Water

Total

Temp °C

 Saturday 23rd June

21:30

40

400

240

680

18

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

400

Water

15

240

TOTAL

40

640

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

40

640

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

1200

Salt

1.6

24

Water

58

928

TOTAL

174.6

2792

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

73

-

% wholegrain flour [approx 85% extraction]

75

-

FACTOR

-

16

 

Method:

    • Build leaven as schedule.
    • Mix Farmhouse flour and water for 3 minutes on first speed, then autolyse for 1 hour.   Add leaven to Autolyse and mix for 5 minutes on first speed.   Add the salt and mix a further 4 – 7 minutes on first speed.   Scrape down the bowl as necessary.   DDT 24°C.
    • Bulk proof 3 hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
    • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes, covered, and prepare the bannetons.   Re-mould dough pieces and place upside down in bannetons.
    • Final proof 2 – 3 hours.
    • Score top with an “A” and bake in a pre-heated electric oven at 250°C with steam for 10 minutes.   Switch to convection, drop the heat to 200°C and bake a further 30 minutes.   Drop the heat to 160°C and bake out 12 - 15 minutes.
    • Cool on wires.

Crumb shots!
DSCF3837DSCF3838DSCF3839

This all leaves me with a good bit of baking to do next week as the Alnwick Farmers' Market takes place on Friday.   After that, it's Hexham on Saturday week.

The Summer looks busy; Alnwick Farmers' Market end of July; Powburn Show early August, more on this soon; holiday on Paxos for 2 weeks; August Farmers' Market; Bank Holiday party for friend's 50th.   Then in September it's Alnwick Food Festival, where I'm doing a presentation and taking a stall along with my colleague Ann from Doughworks [ http://www.doughworks.co.uk/ ]

Happy Baking everybody!

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Alnwick Farmers’ Market; Bread and Roses, May 2012 The sun has been shining in the UK this week, and, finally it is warm here; not before time! Yesterday and today’s baking have produced some very tasty breads plus other treats too [croissants, pain au chocolats, pain amandes and spicy buns]! I laid out my produce this evening and came up with 70 loaves plus the aforementioned treats. There are Gilchesters’ breads made with local flour plus levain, seeded breads and 5 grain breads with levain, an assortment of rye such as Seigle d’Auvergne, Pain de Siègle de Thézac, Moscow Rye and Black Pumpernickel, plus yeasted varieties, wholemeal bloomers, brown tin loaves and chollah I have already posted formulae for all these breads. But, here is a slideshow to summarise the last 2 days, working away at my home, “Ananda” in Powburn, Northumberland. See:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdXNxvvyTA4

All good wishes, and Happy Baking! Andy

ananda's picture
ananda


Nine Weeks’ Baking; summarised

A lot to write about, I suppose, given I have not managed to post a blog entry for almost nine weeks, mainly because I have been so busy, and tied up with so many baking-related activities.

The March Farmers’ Market in Alnwick was a big success; the sun shone all day long, and my stall caught everybody’s attention as it was facing straight at the towns’ shoppers on entry to the Market Square.   I sold out of bread in just over 2 hours.

Alison and I took the long drive to NW Scotland the next day after the Market, for a week’s holiday.   The beautiful weather we had enjoyed for most of March was breaking, so our time in Sutherland brought snow, wind and sleet, as well as sunshine.   Our holiday cottage had an old-fashioned stove with an endless supply of fuel to burn.   The kitchen had some wonderful “le Creuset” pans, so I decided to experiment with the Dutch oven methods of baking oft mentioned on TFL.

I had taken my Rye Sourdough culture plus Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye and Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal.   I baked twice through the week, and made the same loaf each time, naming it “Rye and Wholewheat Holiday Bread”, with an “H” cut into the top.   Here are the essential details:

Rye and Wholewheat Holiday Bread


Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Stock

 

40

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

150

Water

50

250

TOTAL

80

440

Returned to stock

 

40

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1]

80

400

Marriages Organic Strong Wholemeal

70

350

Salt

1.6

8

Water

35

175

TOTAL

186.6

933

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain

100

-

FACTOR

-

5

 

Method:

 

  • Build the sourdough to the required quantity.   I used 2 refreshments over 36 hours.
  • Mix sourdough with water and flour; cover and autolyse 50 minutes.
  • Add salt and develop by mixing by hand for 10 minutes.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours; S&F after one hour
  • Pre-shape, then prepare a banneton.   Final shape.
  • Final Proof for one hour.
  • Pre-heat Electric fan oven containing Le Creuset Roasting pot and lid for one hour to 240°C.   Also set a pan of hot stones in the bottom of the oven prior to pre-heating.
  • Flour the base of the hot Le Creuset pot and tip the proved loaf gently into the pot.   Flour the top if needed, then score an “H” for holiday into the top.   Load the lidded pot to the oven and apply steam.   Turn the heat to 200°C after 15 minutes.   Take the lid off after another 15 minutes and bake out for another 10 – 15 minutes.   Turn the oven off and leave the loaf inside for 10 minutes with the door wedged ajar.
  • Cool on wires.

 

What was special?   This is a 100% wholegrain loaf, with 85% hydration.   Our sandwiches, enjoyed out “in the hills” were joyful.   Here is a brief reminder of an amazing part of the world which we both love so much.

 See:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ny1zVAsT_IM&feature=plcp 

I revised my Hot Cross Bun recipe, finally giving in and cutting down on the liquid content, which was excessive.   Freshly ground spices; they are divine!   Formula:

 

HOT CROSS/SPICY BUNS

Makes 36 buns @ 70g

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe[grams]

1. FERMENT

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

20

180

Caster Sugar

5

45

Fresh Yeast

8

72

Water @ 38°C

45

405

TOTAL

78

702

2. FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Ferment [from above]

78

702

Strong White Bread Flour

80

720

Salt

1

9

Milk Powder

8

72

Butter

15

135

Egg

15

135

Caster Sugar

15

135

Cinnamon

1

9

Nutmeg

1

9

Sultanas

33

297

Raisins

17

153

Mixed Peel

17

153

TOTAL

281

2529

3. CROSSING PASTE

 

 

White Flour

 

150

Shortening

 

35

Water

 

200

4. STOCK SYRUP

 

 

Caster Sugar

 

150

Water

 

150

 

 

 

FACTOR

 

9

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge [flying ferment]: Weigh out the water, making sure temperature is correct.   Dissolve the yeast into the water.   Add the flour and sugar, and whisk to a smooth batter.   Cover and leave in a warm place for 45 minutes
  • Weigh the other ingredients: blend the flour with the other dry ingredients.   Cut the butter into small pieces and rub roughly through the dry ingredients.   Weigh the egg separately.   Weigh the dried fruit separately.
  • Add the egg and dry ingredients to the risen sponge, and combine to form a soft and strong dough.   Mix for 3 minutes on first speed and 8 minutes on second speed to develop, scraping down the bowl as necessary.
  • Rest the dough for 20 minutes, then use a metal cutter to cut through the dough and add the fruit.
  • Rest the dough for 40 minutes.   Scale and divide into 70g pieces
  • Mould each dough piece round, and rest covered for 15 minutes.   Prepare 3 baking sheets for the oven.   Pre-heat the oven [180°C, or, 160°C for a fan oven]
  • Re-mould dough pieces and tray-up 4 x 3 on baking sheets lined with silicone paper [baking parchment].   Brush the tops of the dough pieces with beaten egg and cover.
  • Final proof in a warm environment for 1½ to 2 hours.
  • Pipe on crosses for HotXBuns.
  • Bake for 15 – 20 minutes
  • Glaze with sugar syrup immediately after baking
  • Cool on wires

 

The April Farmers’ Market was equally successful; I took record takings, and had one loaf left to give to my business adviser who I was able to meet up with after the market closed to discuss a potentially very exciting new business opportunity currently being explored.

Early in May we set out on a new Farmers’ Market adventure with a partnership with an old friend and business colleague who has built a fabulous wood-fired oven in his garden in Ryton, on the edge of the very lovely Tyne Valley.   I have posted on this before, here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27794/development-day-work-nigel-13th-march-2012

My friend Nigel is making some White Levain breads and some Golden Linseed and Light Rye breads.   I am making Moscow Rye and Gilchesters’ Miche, which I have posted on before…a number of times.   We made just short of 100 loaves.   Moving forward our aim is to make 150 loaves.   Hexham is a lovely, historic town in the west of Northumberland, and trade at the Farmers’ Market is brisk…weather permitting!!   We enjoyed sunshine and had sold out by lunchtime.   Very good vibes!

Now I am building up stock ready for the next Alnwick Farmers’ Market on Friday.   I’ve made Moscow Rye and some Black Pumpernickel breads in pans to keep the non-wheat people happy, as well as plenty of Gilchesters’ type breads.   Today I spent some time perfecting a Pain de Campagne recipe using 2 leavens.   I have posted similar before, but here are the details:

20th May 2012

Pain de Campagne with Rye Sourdough and Wheat Levain

Rye Sour Refreshment:

Day/date

Time

Sour [g]

Dark Rye [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

Temp °C

Sat 19 May

15:00

40

200

120

360

28°C

 

Wheat Levain Refreshment:

Day/Date

Time

Levain

Bread Flour

Water

Total

Temp °C

Sat 19 May

15:00

40

160

96

296

22°C

Sat 19 May

18:00

296

200

120

616

22°C

 

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a Wheat Levain

60% hydration

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

22.5

360

Water

13.5

216

TOTAL

36

576

 

 

 

1b Rye Sourdough

167% hydration

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

7.5

120

Water

12.5

200

TOTAL

20

320

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

36

576

Rye Sourdough [from 1b]

20

320

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

50

800

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

20

320

Salt

1.5

24

Water

43

688

TOTAL

170.5

2728

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

69

-

% wholegrain flour

27.5

-

FACTOR

-

16

 

Method:

  • Prepare the levains as schedule.   Make a cold “autolyse” with final dough flour and water plus the rye sourdough.   Chill the autolyse and the wheat levain overnight.
  • Combine wheat levain and autolyse in the mixer on first speed for 5 minutes.   Add the salt, mix 2 minutes on first and 3 minutes on second speed.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale and divide [2 @ 1400g]; mould round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare 2 large bannetons.   Re-mould and set for final proof in bannetons.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.   Pre-heat oven.
  • Tip onto peel, cut the top of the loaf and mist with water spray; set on stone in the oven.   Apply steam.    Set into oven at 280°C, no fan.   Set heat to 250°C.   Mist loaf after 10 minutes and top up steam if needed.   After another 10 minutes, switch to convection and drop heat to 200°C for 20 minutes.   Drop heat to 180°C and bake out a further 10 – 15 minutes.
  • Cool on wires.

A few photos:

 

I wrote a feature on the joys of baking bread at home, which appeared in “Culture” Magazine late in April, free with the Newcastle Journal.   Maybe you can see it here? The feature is on pp.58: http://www.journallive.co.uk/2012/04/26/culture-magazine-december-2011-61634-28430272/

 

And last week a local cookery writer came to visit and do a day of baking with me.   Her enthusiasm was infectious, and I tested both the wood-fired oven and electric oven to the limit, making Seigle d’Auvergne, Gilchesters’ White loaves, Wholemeal Bloomers, Moscow Rye panned loaves and Spicy Buns [as a featured recipe].   Busy day!   For more on Jane Lovett, see here: http://www.janelovett.com/

Honestly, there is a lot more than this going on just now, and it is making it impossible for me to post as much as I have done in the past.   My apologies for that.   Still, I promise to keep everyone up to speed on the Bread and Roses baking ventures, somehow or other.

Oh! Alison’s booked our holidays too: we are off to Paxos in August for 2 weeks.   It’s the Powburn Show just before we go, and Alnwick Farmers’ Market shortly after we return!   Then it’s the Food Festival in Alnwick in September and I have a Guest Speaker slot.    Hopefully, I will have completed my Dissertation too and be looking forward to a trip to London to celebrate being awarded a Master’s Degree.   That is sometime away, and a lot will happen in between times.

My very best wishes to you all

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Seigle d’Auvergne


This is very much my own formula adaptation, but it takes its inspiration from Daniel Leader’s lovely book “Local Breads: Sourdough and Whole-grain Recipes from Europe’s Best Artisan Bakers”, see pp. 158 – 161.   Leader credits Armandio Pimenta, who has a bakery in Clermont-Ferrand, Auvergne, as the source for his formula.   My effort does not use the same refreshment regime, nor does it rely on hot water at the mixing stage.   Leader has a photograph of his loaf in the plates between pages 84 and 85 of my edition; the loaves I baked compare well, although I made 2 Miche, scaled at just over 1700g, where Leader’s recipe produces 1 loaf, slightly smaller at 1195g.

Here is the detail:

Rye Sour Refreshment

Day

Date

Sour [g]

Dark Rye [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

Thursday 22nd March

20:30

40

150

250

440

Friday 23rd March

18:30

440

300

500

1240

 

Final Dough

I made this on the Saturday morning, beginning the mixing at 06:00

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

22.5

450

Water

37.5

750

TOTAL

60

1200

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1.]

60

1200

Shipton Organic Light Rye [997]

50

1000

Marriage’s Organic Strong Flour

27.5

550

Salt

1.6

32

Water

35

700

TOTAL

174.1

3482

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

22.5

-

% overall hydration

72.5

-

% wholegrain flour

22.5

plus 50% @ 0.997 ash

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

  • Mix the sourdough, water and flours using a hook attachment, for 4 minutes on first speed, scraping down the bowl as needed.   Autolyse for half an hour.   Add the salt and mix 1 minute on first speed and 5 minutes on second speed, scraping down the bowl as required.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours.
  • Scale the paste using wet hands into 2 pieces and shape round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare 2 bannetons dusted generously with dark rye flour.   Re-shape the dough pieces and place smooth-side up into the bannetons.
  •  Final proof 1 hour.
  • For baking, pre-heat the oven to 280°C for one hour.   Tip the loaf directly onto the hearth stone, apply steam and bake without the fan for 15 minutes at 250°C.   Drop the heat to 200°C, switch to convection and bake out for 50 minutes.
  • Cool on wires

This is the dough at the end of bulk proof:

 Finished Loaf, Crust and Crumb Shots:

 

We enjoyed one of these loaves with our dinner with friends last night.   The depth of flavour from the sourdough was intense; it was an accompaniment to avocado, served with the biggest prawns I have ever seen.   Munching on more of this bread with a salad for lunch today and I noted the sour flavour was much less pronounced, allowing more subtle flavours to come through; much improved to my taste.   The crumb is moist, but not overly so, and wonderfully easy to chew on.

The first loaf stood up tall in the oven, even though the formula uses over 72% rye flour.   I used Organic white bread flour at 11.6% protein, not High Gluten flour.   I should have delayed shaping the second loaf, as the long bake time meant this loaf was over-proved when it came to bake.   I’ve photographed the best-looking loaf, although the crumb shots come from the over-proved one.

We love this bread; such an eating treat for us for the rest of the week.   The Market beckons; this means I have plenty of baking to do this week.

All good wishes

Andy

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