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ananda

Hi Again!


Very quickly following on from my last post "Whitsuntide Breads and Other Antics", this is a quick post listing the books that I recommend for my bakery students to source to aid their programme of study.


Hansjoakim asked me about this, after I posted information about a Student Bread Competition.   There are just short of 50 books on the list.   The one I most want is one Hans referenced sometime ago by Claus Schunemann.   I've tried to get it through Amazon UK, and finally received an e-mail today.   Original price for the book is just over £55.   I would pay that!   However, a secondhand version is about £90 + P&P, and a new version is over £125 + P&P!!!!


The College Library service is top class.   Next year's books are ordered already.   These will now come mainly as e-books.   Most of the books I'm ordering now are scientific and technical and go over the magic £100 mark.   That's the point where alarm bells start sounding in our "cash-strapped" world of UK 2010!   Books shown below with double * are in our library.   Others are noted as on order in some shape or form.


Of course, blogging on TFL partly shows my keen enthusiasm for all matters electronic too.   And this is very highly valued by the College....To the extent that, as Lecturers, our use of ILT is monitored and built in to performance management.   Every course  which runs in College has a "Blackboard" site.   This is a means of inter-active learning for students, and the sites I have created for the bakery course I run are my pride and joy.   I won 2nd prize last year as ILT Practitioner of the Year.   The site content allows students to access any learner materials night and day, either in College, or anywhere else, given access to a pc and the internet.   Materials include a host of photgraphs from all the practical classes, plus demonstration videos.   Some of these are available on my TFL blog, as you may have already seen.   All course details and documents are posted, and folders full of my recipes.   The front page is an "Announcements" area, enabling me to provide rapid and immediate news for students [eg the news of the Apprenticeship Baker post which came up the day before yesterday].   There is also a place for "External Links".   I have quite a range in here; top of the pile is immediate access to....THE FRESH LOAF, of course!


In the syllabus area, there are loads of documents for students to use to complete the course.   Also in here, is this list shown below.   Well, my studies at University in the early 1980s involved use of microfiche to access books in the library,; no computers whatsoever!   I didn't even know how to word process until early 2004!   Some folks think mobile phones are where it's at, and others go more for media such as television.   I've long been convinced that the most powerful player is the pc, and, particularly the internet.   Anybody disagree about that?


So if I've missed anything off please let me know.   As you can see, there is a big "hats off" to the great US Artisan Bakers; my personal big inspiration in the book world of the last 5-10 years.   A quick count up suggests I own about 20 of the books shown in my personal baking library.


BOOKLIST:


 


Recommended Texts


I will add to this list from time to time:


**Amendola, J., Rees, N. (2003) Understanding Baking: The Art and the Science of Baking. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


Banfield, W.T. (1947) Manna: A Comprehensive Treatise on Bread Manufacture. London: Maclaren & Sons


**Barenbaum, R.L. (2003) The Bread Bible. New York & London: Norton


**Bertinet, R. (2007) Crust: Bread to Get Your Teeth Into. London: Kyle Cathie


**Bertinet, R. (2008; paperback, with dvd) Dough: Simple Contemporary Bread. London: Kyle Cathie


** [7 copies]Brown, J. et. al. [Eds] (1996) The Master Bakers' Book of Bread Making. Hertfordshire: NAMB


**Calvel, R., MacGuire, J., Wirtz, R. (2001) The Taste of Bread. Gaithersburg, Md.L: Aspen


Cauvain, S. P. [ed] (2003) Bread Making: Improving Quality Cambridge: Woodhead [on order as an e-book]


Cauvain, S. P., Young, L. S. (2006) The Chorleywood Bread Process. Cambridge: Woodhead


**Cauvain, S. P., Young, L. S. (2007) The Technology of Breadmaking. 2nd Edition. New York: Springer - Verlag


**Cauvain, S. P., Young, L. S. (2009) More Baking Problems Solved. Cambridge: Woodhead


Collister, L., Blake, A. (1993) The Bread Book London: Conran Octopus


** [multiple copies]Connelly, P., Pittam, M. (1997) Practical Bakery. London: Hodder & Stoughton


**David, E. (1979) English Bread and Yeast Cookery. London: Penguin


**DiMuzio, D. T. (2009) Bread Baking: An Artisan's Perspective. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


**Edwards, W. P. (2007) The Science of Bakery Products London: Royal Society of Chemistry


**Figoni, P. (2008) How Baking Works: Exploring the Fundamentals of Baking Science 2nd Edition. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


**Friberg, B. (2002) The Professional Pastry Chef: Fundamentals of Baking and Pastry.  4th Edition. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


**Friberg, B. (2003) The Advanced Professional Pastry Chef: Advanced Baking and Pastry Techniques. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


**Gisslen, W. (2008) Professional Baking. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


**Glezer, M. (2000) Artisan Baking Across America. New York, Artisan


**Hamelman, J. (2004) Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc


**Hanneman, L.J. (1991) Bakery: Flour Confectionery. 2nd Edition. Oxford: Butterworth - Heinemann


**Hanneman, L.J. (1992) Bakery: Bread and Fermented Goods. 2nd Edition. Oxford: Butterworth - Heinemann


** [multiple copies]Hanneman, L.J. (1993) Patisserie 2nd Edition. Oxford: Butterworth - Heinemann


Hui, Y. H. et. al. [Eds] (2006) Bakery Products: Science and Technology New York/London: Wiley-Blackwell [on order as an e-book]


Kaplan, S. L. (2006) Good Bread Is Back: A Contemporary History Of French Bread, The Way It Is Made, And the People Who Make It. Durham and London: Duke


Kirkland, J. (1927) The Modern Baker, Confectioner and Caterer. London: Gresham


**Labensky, S., Martel, P., van Damme, E (2009) On Baking: A Textbook of Baking and Pastry Fundamentals.  New Jersey: Pearson, Prentice Hall


**Leader, D., Blahnik, J. (1993) Bread Alone: Bold Fresh Loaves From Your Own Hands. New York: Morrow


**Leader, D., Chattman, L. (2007) Local Breads: Sour Doughs and Whole Grain Recipes From Europe's Best Artisan Bakers. New York: Norton


**Lepard, D. (2004) The Handmade Loaf. London: Mitchell Beazley


**Lepard, D., Whittington, R. (2010) Baking with Passion: Baker and Spice. London: Quadrille


**Ortiz, J. (1993) The Village Baker. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press


**Reinhart, P. (2001) The Bread Baker's Apprentice. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press


**Reinhart, P. (2006; paperback) Crust and Crumb: Master Formulas for Serious Bread Bakers. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press


**Reinhart, P. (2007) Whole Grain Breads. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press


**Reinhart, P. (2009) Artisan Breads Everyday: Fast and Easy Recipes for World-Class Breads. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press


**Rinsky, G., Rinsky, L. H. (2008) The Pastry Chef's Companion: a Comprehensive Resource  Guide for the Baking and Pastry Professional. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons


**Roux, M., Roux, A. (1993) The Roux Brothers on Patisserie. London: Little, Brown


**Shulman, M-R. (1990) Bread Book. London: Macmillan


Stevens, D. (2009) Bread: River Cottage Handbook No. 3. London: Bloomsbury


**Suas, M. (2008) Advanced Bread and Pastry USA: Delmar Cengage Learning


**Treuille, E., Ferrigno, U., O'Leary, I. (1998) Bread. London: Dorling Kindersley


**Whitley, A. (2006) Breadmatters: the state of modern bread and a definitive guide to baking your own. London: Fourth Estate


**Wing, D., Scott, A. (1999) The Bread Builders: Hearth Loaves and Masonry Ovens. Vermont: Chelsea Green.


 


 


MOST WANTED:


Baking: The Art and Science (Hardcover)   by Claus Schunemann (Author)


 


Other texts of interest to be found in the College Library:



Author

Title

Publisher

Cordon Bleu

"Baking 1" and "Baking 2"   1971

London; Macdonald and Jane's

Daniel A. R.

"The Bakers' Dictionary" 2nd edition, 1971

"Bakery Materials and Methods" 4th edition 1963

"Bakery Questions Answered" 1972

"Up-to-date Confectionery" 1978

ALL:

Essex; Elsevier Applied Science

Richemont Craft School

"Perfect Bakery and Confectionery" 1989

"Swiss Bakery" 1988

"Swiss Confiseur" 1987

"Swiss Confectionery" 1985

ALL

Lucerne; Richemont

Barrows, A. E.

"Bakery Specialities" 1984

Essex; Elsevier Applied Science

Shulman, M. R.

"The Bread Book" 1990

London; Macmillan

Schumacher, M.

"Complete Book of Baking" 1993

London; Tiger

Culinary Institute of America

"Baking and Pastry - Mastering the Art and Craft" 2004

New Jersey; John Wiley

Bachman, W.

"Swiss Bakery and Confectionery" 1949

London; Maclaren

Boyle, T. and Moriarty, T.

"Grand Finales - Art of Plated Desserts" 1997

"Modernist View [Grand Finales] 1997

BOTH:

New York, John Wiley

Fance, W. J. [ed]

"New International Confectioner" 5th Edition 1981

London; Virtue

Nicolello, I

"New Manual in Patisserie and Confectionery"

"Complete Confectionery Techniques" 1994

Complete Pastrywork Techniques" 1991

"Basic Pastrywork Techniques" 1991

** there are 10 copies of this manual in the library!!

 

ALL:

London; Hodder and Stoughton

Barker, W.

"The Modern Patissier" 1983

London; Hutchinson

Healy, B. and Bugat, P.

"Mastering the Art of French Pastry" 1984

New York; Barron's

Karousos, G.

"The Patissier's Art 1994

New York; John Wiley

Juillet, C.

"Classic Patisserie" 1998

London; B. H

Bennion and Bamford

"Technology of Cakemaking" 1930, rep 1986

Worcester; Billings. There is a recently updated version of this available, but not in the library

 

 

Sugarcraft

 

Author

Title

Ashby, P

"Marzipan"

Boyle, P. T.

"Sugar Work"

Lees, R. and Jackson, E. B.

"Sugar Confectionery and Chocolate Manufacture"

McFadden, C and France, C

Chocolate - Cooking with the World's Best Ingredient

Sinkeldam, C.

"Art of Marzipan Modelling"

Storer, E.

"Complete Book of Marzipan"

Lodge, N

International School of Sugarcraft

 

Best wishes

Andy

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ananda

 


Whitsuntide Baking and Other Antics


Today has been a busy day making a range of breads.   I had refreshed both my rye sourdough and wheat levain, with no definite projects in mind.   Given store cupboard availability at the time, this is what I've ended up with:


•1.    Cheese Bread


Part of the "Hamelman Challenge", I made this Cheese Bread using the white levain, pretty much to the recipe.   I'm afraid I couldn't extend to Parmegiano Regiano, but I did have a half decent Farmhouse Mature Cheddar Cheese to use as substitute.   As with all the breads made at home, this is solely reliant on natural yeasts, so it took a considerably longer time to prove than Hamelman suggests in his book.   I made a small loaf in a banneton which was underproved.   So, I just allowed the loaf in the Pullman Pan to prove for about 3 hours before baking; this was after a 2 hour bulk proof, so I was really pleased with the end result.   It is to formula, found on pp.180-1 of the book, apart from these alterations.


•2.    Roasted Brazil Nut and Prune Bread


Well, it should be hazelnut, but I was quite happy to use brazils instead.   No added yeast, just the white levain.   To formula otherwise.   The loaf shown is just shy of 1.2kg.   I baked it at 180°C for 55 minutes.   It had stuck, ever so slightly in the "banneton", but I was really happy about the lovely moist crumb in the final baked loaf.   Prunes are a new household favourite, and we have sourced dried fruits which have been packed perfectly, and knock the socks off even fresh plums!    See pp. 185-6


•3.    Horst Bandel's Black Pumpernickel


Given I bought 3kg of Organic Rye Berries and 3kg of Organic Cracked Rye Grain, I want to keep on producing "Pumpernickel-style" breads.   8 hours steaming works so well; keeping qualities are unsurpassed.   We both love this bread...lots and lots!


•4.    Wholegrain Bread leavened with a Rye Sourdough


This one's my own recipe, shown below.   I made it as one BIG loaf in a banneton, using bran as a topping to the bread, which weighed in just short of 1.4kg prior to baking!   The flours are all organic; the formula is as straightforward as can be for this type of loaf.   Bulk ferment time was about 2 hours, with 2 S&F in that time.   Final proof was similarly 2 hours.   I do so love using rye sourdough to leaven any type of bread.   This loaf makes me think of Leader's Pane di Genzano, and yet the 2 formulae have little in common.   Can't wait to try it!   Bake profile utilised steam, loaded at full heat of 250°C, reduced to 220°C after 10 minutes, then 200°C for the last 20 minutes of a 50 minute bake.


Pre-fermented Flour: 13.8%  Overall Hydration: 67.2%


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

  • 1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Organic Dark Rye Flour

13.8

112

Water

23.2

188

TOTAL

37

300

 

 

 

  • 2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough

37

300

Organic Strong White Flour

43.1

350

Organic Strong Wholemeal Flour

43.1

350

Salt

1.7

14

Water

44

357

TOTAL

168.9

1371

 

Photographs shown below:

 

 

Student Bread Competition

The end of the student academic year approaches.   Currently we are building 2 College Buildings out of Cake ready for the EAT Food Festival held in Newcastle later in June.

At the end of April we played host to Warburtons to celebrate National Bread Week; the first week of May.   A huge organisation, and massively successful baking company; this was a great opportunity for the students, and they all did the College and themselves proud.   They divided into 3 groups and designed their own loaves to produce and present to a Senior Manager at the local Warburtons Bakery in our city.   Hamelman's Roast Potato and Onion Bread was the inspiration for one group, and it was soo moist; probably my favourite on the day!   Another group was led by a baker from Sicily, and the recipe lent heavily on the Semolina Bread I posted on not long ago.   Both these breads were made using a Biga Naturale, prepared and fostered by the students themselves.   The winners went down the seed route in a big way, and adopted rye sourdough as a means to pack a punch with flavour.   Clearly this impressed the judge!   They actually made Pain Siègle, a Wholegrain Chollah with seed topping, and a "Couronne" of rolls using rye sour dough and topped with seeds.

Some photographs are attached.   Most of these are taken on a mobile phone, so, apologies for lack of quality.

 

I don't seem to have posted on the blog for a while; hope this keeps up the interest!

Best wishes to you all

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi


This is just a quickie to show how I prefer this bread; as a steamed "pudding".   The "Pullman Pan" is ideal to make sandwiches, but I prefer not to bake this loaf.   Steaming time for a 600g loaf is about 8 hours!   Cool, then wrap in linen for 24 hours.   Finally, this loaf can now be sliced for eating; AND, it's so good!


Photographic evidence attached:



Best wishes


Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


Slight Variations on Two More Formulae from Hamelman's "Bread"


 


I made these last weekend.


75% Sourdough Rye with a Rye Flour Soaker


This was pretty faithful to the original recipe, except that the rye flour had to be cut back to 75%, as I ran out of dark rye flour.   Also, it is leavened only by the sourdough; no added yeast.  Detail is shown below.


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

  • 1. Sourdough

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

 

600

Water

 

500

Sour from stock

 

215

TOTAL

 

1315

[35 returned to stock]

  • 2. Soaker

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

 

400

Boiling Water

 

400

TOTAL

 

800

  • 3. Final Dough

 

 

Sourdough [from above]

Flour: 35; Water 29

1280 [flour 700, water 580]

Soaker [from above]

Flour 20; Water 20

800 [flour 400, water 400]

Dark Rye Flour

25

500

Strong White Flour

20

400

Salt

1.8

36

Water

29

580

TOTAL

 

3596

Pre-fermented flour is 35%.   Overall hydration is 78%

Method:

  • I followed the book, except that I didn't use yeast, at all. To deal with this I gave 1 hour bulk, and final fermentation time was around 2 hours.
  • I made these as extremely large tinned loaves; one in a Pullman Pan at 2kg, the other just over 1.5kg. See photos. Bake time was a long 1 hour 30mins for the Pullman, and 1 hour 10 mins for the other tin. Baking temperature was 195-200*C. I misted the top of the open tinned loaf, and used just a little steam when the loaves went in.
  • Cooled on wires, then wrapped in baker's linen for 24 hours before cutting.

See photographs of process and finished products below

 

Miche, Pointe-à-Callière

 

I made a few adjustments to this formula, as I don't have a ready access to the high extraction flour in the formula.   I used a sifted wholemeal flour at 50%, and strong white flour at 50%.   I increased the pre-fermented flour from 20 to 25%.   The hydration I reduced to 72%.   This  reflects the greater white flour element, and my personal preference not to go too wet for this type of loaf.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

  • 1. Leaven First Build

 

 

Leaven [from stock]

 

135

Strong White Flour

 

135

Water

 

80

TOTAL

 

350

  • 2. Leaven Final Build

 

 

Leaven [from above]

 

350

Strong White Flour

 

350

Water

 

210

TOTAL

 

910

[110 returned to stock]

  • 3. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven [from 2. above]

Flour 25; Water 15

800 [flour 500, water 300]

Sifted Strong Wholemeal

50

1000

Strong White Flour

25

500

Salt

1.8

36

Water

57

1140

TOTAL

 

3476

Pre-fermented flour is 25%.   Overall hydration 72%

 

Method:

  • 2 levain builds with 12 hour fermentation periods at 20°C.
  • Autolyse 40 minutes
  • Mix by hand, 15 minutes; DDT 21°C
  • Bulk time 3½ hours, 3 S&F
  • Scale for 2 large and 1 medium sized Boules, mould and place upside down in bannetons.
  • Final proof around 3 hours
  • Bake; use full steam and set at 240°C for 15 minutes. Reduce to 200°C for further 20 minutes, then 180°C for a final 10 minutes, or just over, for the larger loaves.
  • Cool on wires

 

See all photographs below for process and finished products.

 

 

Best wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


DonD's Baguettes à'Ancienne with Cold Retardation


A short while ago Don posted his latest work on these techniques he has been developing recently.   You can view his most excellent work here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17415/baguettes-l039ancienne-cold-retardation  


Just over a week ago in a post which you can read here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17275/french-terms


Don clarified a technique discussed by Daniel Wing in "The Bread Builders" book he co-authored with Alan Scott, known as "Bassinage".   This seems to be a dough mixing technique whereby the dough is mixed slightly tight, but then has additional water added late in the mixing.   The consensus seemed to be that this was not a way we would enjoy mixing dough.   But Don, and David Snyder before him; see here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/8524/philippe-gosselin039s-pain-%C3%A0-l039ancienne-according-peter-reinhart-interpretted-dmsnyder-m


had adopted this technique using a long cold autolyse first, then adding salt yeast, and the extra water the next day, after an overnight refrigeration period.


Well, ideally you need a mixer for this to be effective, and I mix most of my dough at home by hand.   I do have a small hand-held electric mixer which has hook attachments as an alternative to the usual whisks.   So, I mixed the dough in small batches and developed a very fine dough.   The recipe I used is identical to the one given by David Snyder as shown above; except that I use fresh yeast and not dried.   I then followed Don's method of combining the Gosselin formula with the Bouabsa method to give long autolyse, mix and part ambient ferment, chilled ferment, then final proof and bake.   For the record I used the T65 farine de tradition French flour, as described here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17118/competing-louis-lesaffre-cup and here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16151/working-french-flour at 94% and 6% Dark Rye Flour, with hydration at 71% in total, as is David's formula from Peter Reinhart.


First time round I encountered the following problem:   I used 3 times the amount of fresh yeast to David's dried, all the time thinking that 1.5% was too much!   And it was.   Also the heat rise to mix the final dough took the finished dough temperature to 20°C.   This despite the hard work I put in to make sure the autolyse temperature was a cold 5°C.   So, the dough was kicking after just 2 hours and a S&F each hour.   This first time, I had made double quantity too, so the larger bulk really was moving.


I held the dough in the fridge til evening, giving a 6 hour cold fermentation period, but then decided I had to bake it before I went to bed.   On reflection, I should have divided the dough, semi-shaped it, then put it back in the fridge overnight.   The loaves came out looking somewhat under-proved, with a long split along the side of each baguette.   I made a boule as well, and that had similar betrayal of under-proving.


A brief report back to Don and David, then underway with the second attempt.  This time I used 1.5 times the amount to convert dried to fresh yeast.   Also, a smaller dough with a final temperature of 18°C, which was much easier to manage.   It had the full 3 hours with S&F, then back into the fridge overnight.   This morning, I watched Ciril Hitz's video on YouTube, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OI-WstoakmQ


Then scaled and shaped 4 baguette pieces at just over 200g each, and set them en coûche.   The dough temperature in my warming kitchen reached 20°C, after a half hour's proof.   This was where I was still unsure how long to keep proving the dough.   This is where the beauty of long cold fermentation really comes through.   The dough is so stable, even though it is very well-matured.   I baked the first batch of 2 after 1½ hours final proof; not long enough, I soon realised.   I took an important phonecall regarding progress on my latest Food Policy assignment for my Master's Degree.   That was quite a blessing, as it held me up half an hour.   By this time the dough was becoming a little sticky, but still handled really well.   The resulting bake was very pleasing.


I made some egg mayonnaise with fresh dill, parsley and spring onion, and a salad to go with it, then took some photographs of this and the finished bread.   My wife and I ate 2 of these baguettes with the salad and eggs for our lunch straight after.   I know the crumb is not so open, although it was spot-on for translucency, and I have still to master proper cutting techniques.   The grignette I purchased has helped, but the scoring is not deep enough.   That said, the balance of crispy crust to soft tasty crumb was just right, and the bread was so fresh too.   Just a hint of rye, no pre-ferment; the first time I've really tried to work through such a formula.


Thanks again to Don and David; there is no obvious extra work involved in the longer ferment, if anything, it fits in well with a daily work pattern.


Photos shown here:


 


Best wishes


Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


Semolina [Durum] Bread and Sourdough Seed Bread.


I've been home-based all Easter weekend, so I decided on Thursday that I would make an inroad into the Hamelman Challenge set up by Brian: see http://thebreadchallenge.weebly.com/


I've already done quite a bit on baguettes for the Lesaffre Cup I was involved in http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17118/competing-louis-lesaffre-cup  and I posted last weekend on the Horst Bandel Black Pumpernickel http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17254/horst-bandel039s-balck-pumpernickel


I'm posting all the production details and photographs below.   I haven't been totally faithful to Hamelman's formula, but will point out where and why at the relevant points.


Semolina [Durum] Bread


Hamelman, Jeffrey 2004 "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes" New Jersey; John Wiley and Sons.  pp.135-136


 


Recipe and Formula:


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

"Sponge"

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

19.7

365

Water

13.8

255

Sugar

1.9

36

Biga Naturale [from stock]

34.9 [flour 20.6;

water 14.3]

644 [flour 380; water 264]

TOTAL

70.3

1300

 

 

 

Final Dough

 

 

"Sponge" from above

70.3

1300

Strong White Flour

29.85

550

Semolina

29.85

550

Water

33.5

620

Salt

1.8

33

Olive Oil

4.9

91

TOTAL

170.2

3144

Pre-fermented flour: 40.3%. Hydration: 61.6%

Method:

  • As you can see, the first change I made is that I used "Biga Naturale" in this recipe instead of a sponge.   Partly because I had some old biga in stock, partly because Alison, my  wife,  is happier if I can keep the bakers' yeasts out of the formula.  I had about 150g of biga in stock, so fed that to give me sufficient for the 644g needed for the recipe, plus some to keep back for another day.   I did this "élaboration" approx. 16 hours before making the "sponge".
  • The sponge was made at 28°C, but given 2½ hours to ripen.   It would have taken a little more than this, but was obviously active.   The original recipe specifies 1¼ hours, but it uses bakers' yeast.
  • The next change I made was that I used an "autolyse" technique with the semolina only.   Let me explain that the semolina I used would be quite different to the type the author would most likely be considering for his recipe.   I buy the semolina from a local miller in Northumberland.   It is coarse and gritty, and quite a bit more brown than the golden varieties sold in UK supermarkets.   I love it; it's a great way to use up some of the by-products from making this gentleman's very fine pizza/ciabatta flour.   I mentioned the Gilchesters Organic Flour in this post: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/15974/sour-dough-leaven-refreshment-and-ash-content  I wanted to try and maintain the hydration levels of the original formula [62%].   In order to do this I exchanged the durum used by Hamelman in the sponge for strong white flour.   Given the durum wheat used in the US will be a very hard grain, and the Gilchesters grain is grown in the North of England, which is hardly our "bread basket", you can maybe understand my switch.
  • The autolyse worked really well. The semolina is very coarse and unrefined, so a good soak allowed for plenty of absorption.
  • I mixed the dough by hand, achieving a DDT of 24°C, as required. The dough was strong, and I gave it plenty of work on the bench.
  • From there I followed the recipe directions, using 1½ hours bulk, with a stretch and fold at the mid-point.
  • I made 3 large loaves in bannetons and set aside for final proof.
  • I baked these breads after 2½ hours final fermentation, again, due to the biga, fermentation time was a good hour longer; I was happy with this. The oven had been pre-heated for nearly 2 hours, and I used steam by pouring boiling water onto a pan of hot stones. I set the bread at 240°C, dropped to 200 after 15 minutes, then to 180°C after 40 minutes for the remainder of the bake.
  • The finished loaves are pictured below. The largest loaf, pictured with the long fan cuts, actually weighed in at 1.4kg. I baked it nearly an hour, directly on the hot bricks in my oven. It was still ever-so slightly doughy on the very base when we came to eat it yesterday. Maybe I should have given the "sponge" an extra half hour afterall? Anyway; the taste is fabulous, and I am really happy to have learnt another use for the semolina I buy. Up until now it's only been used for dusting purposes!

 This is the semolina I used

Sourdough Seed Bread

Hamelman, Jeffrey 2004 "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes" New Jersey; John Wiley and Sons.  pp.176-177

 

Recipe and Formula:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Liquid Levain

 

 

Strong White Flour

15

250

Water

19

315

Levain [from stock]

-

50 [flour 22;  water 28]

TOTAL

34

615 - 50 returned to stock = 565

 

 

 

Rye Sour [from stock]

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

7.8

130

Water

13

217

TOTAL

20.8

347

 

 

 

Soaker

 

 

Golden Flax Seeds

7

117

Water - boiling

21

350

TOTAL

28

467

 

 

 

Final Dough

 

 

Liquid Levain

34

565

Rye Sour

20.8

347

Hot Soaker

28

467

Strong White Flour

60.1

1000

Strong Wholemeal Flour

17.1

285

Toasted Sunflower Seeds

11.4

190

Toasted Sesame Seeds

6

100

Water

22

368

Salt

2 [1.6% inc seeds]

33

TOTAL

201.4

3355

Pre-fermented flour: 22.8%.   Hydration: 75% [64% including seeds]

Method:

  • Make the rye sour 16 hours ahead of making the final dough; DDT 21°C
  • Use one élaboration to make the levain needed, then make the levain 12 hours before making the final dough.   DDT 21°C
  • Make the hot soaker at the same time. Cover with cling film and leave to cool overnight. The original recipe uses a cold soaker.
  • Toast the sesame and sunflower seeds under the grill, turning as necessary, until lightly browned
  • Combine all the ingredients to form the final dough. Mix by hand for 10 minutes to achieve a well-developed dough of 24°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours, with one stretch and fold midway through this period.
  • Divide the dough into 3 equal sized pieces and mould round. Rest, covered for 10 minutes. Prepare 2 large bread tins, lined with shortening. Shape 2 loaves for the tins and pan them. Place the other piece upside down in a prepared banneton.
  • Prove overnight in the fridge at 8°C.
  • In the morning, pre-heat the oven for one hour whilst the loaves come back to room temperature. Use steam, by pouring boiling water onto a pan of hot stones.
  • Set the loaf in the banneton and bake that first. Then baked the 2 tinned loaves after that. Baking time will be 45 -50 minutes; set at 240°C, reduce the heat to 200°C after 15 minutes, then 180°C after 40 minutes for the remainder of the bake.

Variations here are as follows: I used rye sour rather than rye flour.   Hamelman's original formula utilises just 15% pre-fermented flour.   I wanted more than this, and will always seek to use rye in a pre-fermented form if possible.   Hydration level is as the original recipe.   I also used a small portion of wholemeal in the final dough, where Hamelman uses all-white flour.   The intensity of my baking session [I'd also made filo pastry for my wife to use to make Spanokopita for our Easter Monday visitors] meant I'd run out of white flour.   However, I was more than happy to use the wholemeal.   The final bread is not at all heavy, nor sour.   It is very "moreish", and is being eaten at quite a rate.

All good wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


Brief Post on Vienna Flour


Uberathlete posted asking about Vienna Flour, see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17241/what-vienna-flour


Elizabeth David (1977; pp.76), in her "English Bread and Yeast Cookery states the following: " 'Vienna' flour was in reality high quality Hungarian or Romanian flour, roller milled, fine, of medium strength and creamy white, good for 'Vienna' bread and puff pastry and yeast cakes."


She also quotes from Frederick T. Vine, "Savoury Pastry" from 1900: "undoubtedly the best flour for the purpose [puff paste] is Vienna...in the first place, flour for paste should be of good colour and finely ground, not too soft or harsh.   It should have a good percentage of gluten, but that gluten must not be so strong that it will pull the rounds into ovals and the ovals into rounds."   Vine goes on to say he found American flour sent for the purpose, to be best suited to making bread only.


David concludes, with reference to England, that "The import of Hungarian and Vienna flours virtually ceased with the disintegration of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after the First World War."


I offer up photographs below of typical breads which may have been made with Vienna-type flour at the time.  These were made during my time studying for my baking quals at Leeds; ostensibly to investigate different methods of manufacturing the same type of bread.   My tutor always used to look very carefully into the bag of Whitworth's Strong bread flour; he always called it "Springs", but that was the old name, and I can't remember the new one.   Whitworth's site is being renovated, so I can't find the right bag, sorry.   Anyway, it had great water absorption, but my tutor explained that by showing us the tiny dark particles in the flour, saying "they are cheating us".   Well, I always thought the bread made that day looked very fine; you can make your own minds up.


 


 


Best wishes


Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


Horst Bandel's Black Pumpernickel.


This is a recipe from "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes" by Jeffrey Hamelman.   A number of TFL regulars have posted on this recipe, notably,


ehanner: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16501/learning-pumpernickel and http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16348/horst-bandel039s-black-pumpernickel-bread


 txfarmer: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/13965/still-struggling-horst-bandel%E2%80%99s-black-pumpernickel and http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14315/horst-bandel%E2%80%99s-black-pumpernickel-finally


and Shiao-Ping: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/12790/horst-bandel039s-black-pumpernickel


This is the recipe and formula I adapted and used


Material

Formula [% of flour(??)]

Recipe [grams]

Rye Sour Dough

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

30

300

Water

30

300

TOTAL

60

600

Soaked Bread

 

 

Old Bread

11

110

Water

17.7

177

TOTAL

28.7

287

Soaked Rye Berries

 

 

Whole Rye Berries

20

200

Water

22.7

227

TOTAL

42.7

427

Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sour Dough

60

600

Soaked Bread

28.7

287

Soaked Rye Berries

42.7

427

Salt

1.8

18

Molasses

4

40

Cracked Rye Grain

25

250

Strong Wholemeal Flour

8

80

Dark Rye Flour - sifted

17

170

Water

15

150

TOTAL

202.2

2022

 

Notes:

The 100% of "flour" is made up of: dark rye in the sour, whole rye berries in the first soaker, plus the cracked rye and the flour in the final dough.   I have not counted the old bread, as that seemed too arbitrary to sub divide accurately into water and flour.

The total water content does include the water in the old bread soaker, as well as the water taken up by cooking the rye berries.   My aim was to establish a formula which accurately created an overall moisture content of 85% of the "flour".

Obviously there will be some variation from batch to batch, but I really wanted to establish how much liquid is taken up in the bread soaker, and in the berry soaking and boiling process.   From seeing other peoples' postings, I had decided this information was crucial.

For what it's worth, the pre-fermented part is 30%.

 

Method:

  • Prepare the rye sour dough using starter from stock.   Allow the sour dough to ferment for 14 - 16 hours at 21°C.
  • Soak the rye berries overnight in cold water.
  • Soak the old bread overnight in ambient water.   Use the amounts given in the above table - weighed.   The bread will take up all this water, so you can eliminate any problems of squeezing!   I used some wholewheat pain siègle, and some white bread.   This was deliberate, as I did not have any high gluten white flour in stock, so had to change the flour used in the final dough, using more dark rye plus a dash of wholemeal.   It was all I had at the time!
  • Next day, cook the rye berries in fresh boiling water [3 times volume of water to berries] for about an hour.   Drain the berries, and discard the cooking liquor.   At this point I weighed the berries to establish exactly how much water they had taken up.   This is the figure shown in the table.
  • For the final dough, dissolve the molasses into the water, which should be 40°C.   From there, mix all the ingredients together with the soakers and sour to form an evenly mixed paste.   It was cold in the house when I made this, so both the sour and flour, plus the soaked bread were all well below 20°C    The final dough temperature was 28°C.   Photographs of the mixed paste are shown below.
  • Bulk ferment for 45 minutes.   Meantime lightly grease 1 large Pullman pan and lid.   Pre-heat the oven to 190°C.
  • Use wet hands to scrape up and shape the paste, and deposit it into the tin.   Smooth the surface as necessary.   Cover with an oiled piece of plastic, and prove at 32°C for 1¼ hours.   I use the hearth in front of our wood burning stove.   When the dough is just short of the top of the tin, slide the lid in place, and set in the oven.

  • The baking process is long and complex.   The idea is the loaf should be baked in a falling oven.   For the home baker, this is really difficult to achieve.   I turned the heat down to 120°C after 1½ hours.   After a further 6 hours I turned the oven off.   Then I left the bread in the cooling oven overnight.   This was the best equivalent I could come up with to the recommendations in the book.
  • De-pan the bread and cool on wires.   Wrap in a tea towel, and let the bread sit a full 24 hours before giving into temptation and cutting off that first slice.

 

Analysis:

  • I'm pleased with how this loaf came out in some ways.   For a start Alison, my wife, has been raving about her sandwiches I make for lunch...all week.   I made this bread a week ago now, and didn't cut into it for nearly 2 days.   It served us for lunch sandwiches Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.   There is a little left for today, and it's still almost as moist in the middle of the crumb as when first cut.
  • I like the formula, and am happy with the hydration calculations.   I've attached a couple of photos of the mixed paste to try and show the texture, although I accept they are not the best of shots, I hope it gives an idea.
  • I know Eric added too much flour, and commented on the adverse effect in the eating.   Well, I didn't have any high gluten flour in the house when I made this.   I had a tiny amount of strong wholemeal, and some dark rye!!!   That's why I went with lighter bread in the soaker.   This has definitely made a difference to the finished bread.   It is quite difficult to cut through cleanly without the dough trying to tear a little in places.   You can also spot the giveaway hole just underneath the top crust near the middle of the loaf.   It was the plague of some of the VB rye loaves, and is caused by the weakness in the structure of the starch as the final fermentation draws to conclusion.   This is clearly the typical instability from rye as opposed to the stretchy gluten in the wheat.   Still, the flavour does not detract.
  • My main disappointment, however, is in the baking.   The outer portions of the crumb are over-baked, and the crust is too firm.   But the middle of the crumb is very moist [I had thought about writing overly-moist here, but that's not right; the bread is baked through, and was fine once it had stood before cutting]   I'm thinking the major issue with such a large loaf [it's just over the 2kg mark], with such high hydration [85%] is to be able to "cook" it properly.   I think I set the bread at too high a temperature in the first place.   I've been with Eric all the way on the idea of steaming.   Eric, could you give me the link to the discussion you had with qahtan regarding steaming?   Baking seems a very difficult way to deal with this bread.   It takes me back to producing 000s of Christmas Puddings at the Village Bakery.   We loaded them into wire baskets in their plastic pots, covered with foil lids.   We lowered the wires into coffins made of aluminium.   These were the same size as a standard baking sheet, and would be about 40cm tall, so they filled the height of our oven.   The coffins had water in the bottom, and a raised platform with 3 big holes in, for the wires to sit on.   They also had tight-fitting lids.   They weighed a lot and were really difficult to control with the peel.   Our peels had handles which were 5m in length!   So, the puddings sat at the back of the cooling wood-fired oven for several hours and cooked beautifully in the steam.   I want to devise a similar sort of system to cook the Horst Bandel loaf.   But this is not that easy.   As you can see in the photos, I've made some in the Christmas pudding pots, and this was very successful.   But I love the shape and size of loaf gained from using the Pullman pan.   I want to find a large enclosed vessel which will hold a Pullman pan, and can take a layer of water on the bottom.   I figure some sort of raised wire racking will support the Pullman pan and keep it above the water level.   Anyway, I need to do some work to come up with something along those lines.   I envisage steaming time in the region of 10 - 12 hours.   I do like those glass pans, Eric!
  • I used cracked rye grain instead of rye chops.   I have 2 suppliers for organic rye: one had wholegrain, flour and cracked grain.   The other had chops and flour, but no wholegrain; the explanation was that the grain was tipped straight into the mill on delivery, hence they could not supply wholegrain.   I think this must be a Health and Safety issue, but I found it a little unhelpful, so I went with the other supplier, and the cracked grain option.   I don't think the substitution was that significant.   The whole rye berries need a minimum of 1 hour boil.

 

I'm going to count this as my first recipe in the "Bread Challenge".   To those already signed up, I hope you all think it worthy.

 

 Lots of photos all shown below.   The top 2 on the left were steamed in pudding pots.   The next 2 are of the mixed paste.   Then 5 of the finished loaf baked in the pullman pan.

 

Best wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


Taking Part in a Baking Competition


Way back in early January, not long after I first started posting on TFL, I found an invitation in my e-mails to compete in what becomes the baking world cup: La Coupe du Monde de Bolangerie, next taking place in 2012..


At the international qualification stage, this is known as the Louis Lesaffre Cup http://www.coupelouislesaffre.com/ with the European part set to take place in Paris in 2011.   This sounded quite interesting, so I thought I'd give it a go.   An e-mail enquiry suggested I would have to make baguettes, a tinned loaf, and a speciality loaf of my own.   I decided to give it a go, thinking the UK heats were to be held in May, or, June.   By that time my teaching commitments will be less, and I should have completed the second module for my MSc in Food policy.   So, I entered.


I didn't hear anything more for a few weeks, except confirmation that I was the first applicant, but I would definitely be taking part.   Right at the beginning of March I received a phone call from Nick Townend of BFP Wholesale [yeast company owned by Lesaffre here in the UK], informing me the Competition was set for sometime between the 20th and 24th March, at the NEC in Birmingham, live at the Baking Industry Exhibition.   Let's just say that this event is HUGE!   I'm in the midst of trying to get an assignment complete for my MSc, and I'm already behind schedule, needing a week's extension.   Also, I'd put no plans in place to publicise my plans and score some publicity for Newcastle College, where I lecture.


OK; well I'd better not panic, it'll be just fine, I resolve!   Better get some practice in, and, sort out some materials.   I contacted my colleagues in Kent [see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16151/working-french-flour ]and they agreed to post up 10kg of their wonderful T65 Campteclair Farine de Tradition.   I knew this would be a score on the competition, and had no problem getting permission from the judges to use this flour.   I'd put in quite a lot of work to develop a Caraway Rye Bread with Blackstrap Molasses [see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16273/carawy-rye-bread-black-strap-molasses-superwet-ciabatta-too ] and thought this would be a great choice for my own loaf.   For the tinned bread, I had plans to use a seed soaker with a mix of wholemeal and white bread flours.


Then the Rules were finally published on the 12th March!   Baguettes were indeed required.   One dough using 7kg of flour; half of this to make traditional hand moulded baguettes, the other half to process through a moulding machine.   Finished weight of 240g, I calculated this would give me 36 baguettes!   And, I'd only got 10kg of flour in the first place.   I double-checked, but was told I could only make one dough.   I thought I may get away with a dough using Campteclair for the traditional baguettes, then another dough using industrial flour T55 for the machined products.   No go on this.   Tinned loaves:   3 x 800g finished weight of White Farmhouse, White Sandwich Tin, and Wholemeal.   You can't get much more ordinary than this, but I knew I could at least use sponge and dough methods to get some interesting flavours.   The loaf of choice was also something of a letdown.   Clearly the judges had made moves to keep the competition as "English" as possible...you can all draw your own conclusions on what that implies!   Two from Cottage, Bloomer and Cob loaves; 3 x 800g and 400g finished weights; all white flour.   A minimum of 1 hour bulk ferment was stipulated, but no mention made of overnight fermentation.   For all these products, Lesaffre bread improvers were available, as were their dry sour preparations!!


Well, I was starting to feel somewhat disheartened by now; seriously I was thinking I should pull out.   But a hotel room was booked and paid for by Lesaffre, and I was just about psyched up for the competition side of the whole event.   I needed to talk to some colleagues, big-style.   Thank you to Eric Hanner of TFL who from this point on was of sterling support.   My line manager at work also stepped up and gave me loads of positives.   It was great to have word from Jeffrey Hamelman, explaining some of the rationale behind aspects of the rules [he will be judging in Paris, I guess], but also obviously uninspired by the English choices of bread available to me.


So I frantically began e-mailing through to Nick Townend, establishing whatever I could to know it would all work on the day.   Quite why I had thought the event was in May/June, I really have no idea at all now.   I did 3 days of test baking on 15th, 16th and 17th March, in my bakery kitchen, but teaching a host of different classes at the same time; so, it was extremely stressful, and not all my products turned out how I wanted them.   Still, I had a load of notes, and the confidence in the methods used and my own knowledge and skill to believe I had everything there to make it all work over the upcoming weekend.


I had a trip to Nottinghamshire on Thursday 18th March to visit "The School of Artisan Food".   I had a table seat reserved on the train, so spent the 4 hours tapping away on my wife's laptop to complete all the recipe/formula and methods for each of the breads I was going to make.   I had a great day out visiting what is a wholly exciting new venture, and, I got all this planning work completed too.


Back to College on Friday, to teach a practical baking class, and gather a whole load of equipment and materials together to take to Birmingham.   I slept badly on Friday night, and was up by 5am tapping away on my pc, and catching up with the latest from Eric to help me through.   The drive to Birmingham is over 250 miles from where we live in the very far north of England.   We made very good time, and checked in to the hotel by mid afternoon.   My wife, Alison, went shopping, and I went off to the NEC to make my starter doughs for the next day.


I arrived at the NEC, eventually checked into the right Exhibition Hall with all my stuff, and it was bedlam.   Everyone was working like crazy to have the Hall set up for the next day.   Our "live area" was hardly in any state at all.   There was no baguette moulder, and the equipment available was not really set up, and we had to share it with the Bakels/Rondo team doing live demonstrations in the same cordon.   Well, no machine-moulded baguettes anyway.   Having met all the co-ordinators who were supporting us, the 3 competitors, we then had one hour to make all our overnight ferments.   I had 4 to make!


Anyway, mission accomplished and back to the hotel.   Alison and I made an exit from the hotel to a decent restaurant, so we could get a break from all things bakery competition for a while at least.   I drank just a few beers, and ate some good food, but we went straight to bed on return.   I had an early rise, as the Competition kicked off at 7am.


We were there early and away by 06:50, with 8 hours to complete all our loaves.   Counting against all of us was the equipment.   One of the ovens was low-crown, and we had a lot of tinned breads to make; there was a massive shortage of proving space; we had only one spiral mixer between the 3 of us; the benches we were given were absolutely tiny, and far from robust.   And I discovered the wholemeal flour we had been given was really not up to much.


Well, we were on view to one and all, and I want to say thanks to all those who came past and took such an interest in what I was doing: especially Mr. Tony Jenkins from Soothills Bakers in Hampshire.   He was fascinated that a baker had turned up at a bakery competition prepared to make very simple products using long fermentation methods only, and no improvers.   I was glad to find I wasn't the only one.   Stephen Salt from Tameside College, near Manchester, was on a similar mission; the other baking competitor was Andrew Iyare from London.   There were 2 competitors on the following day, one being Emmanuel Hadijandreou from Judges Bakery, the other was Wayne Caddy who is a bakery consultant based in Rotherham.   I met up with Emmanuel after the competition, which was great; I've been wanting to meet him for a good while.   I know Wayne from my time at Leeds Thomas Danby, as he studied there as well, although some years before me.


The competition was pretty stressful at times.   The lack of equipment was difficult for all of us, and it was difficult to stay organised throughout.   We all managed to work well together, and the support from the co-ordinators on the day was much appreciated.   Andrew had finished in very good time.   Stephen baked his baguettes last of all, then he was finished too.   So I had the run of the ovens at the end, which was a bonus.   This was when I discovered that the Tom Chandley deck oven was low crown, so my tinned loaves were getting a bit stuck on the top heat bars!   I'd taken longer than the others quite deliberately; this had given me 4 hours to prove the baguettes in the chiller following a one hour bulk fermentation.


The Judging Panel had emerged, and I met up with Colin Lomax from Rank Hovis again.   I met him a few years ago at one of Rank's mills in Selby, North Yorkshire.   The current NA President was on the panel, with Peter Lonnican from Blackpool, and Sarah Auton, who had been helping to co-ordinate the whole thing.   All 4 were very supportive, and full of positive comments for our hard work.   I set my 18 baguettes on the sole of the oven with a trusty baguette peel specially made for me at the College, using some coarsely ground semolina from a local organic mill in Northumberland.   I had hoped for a little more proof, but they were so easy to handle, and baked up so crispy in the best deck oven I've worked on in years.   "Best bread of the day" was Colin Lomax's comment.   It was worth competing for that moment alone.   I didn't win the event.   That honour went to Wayne; my congratulations to him.   He gained the place in the UK team for bread baker.   The other places are for a Vienoisserie expert, and for someone to do a decorative dough piece.


I've attached a load of photos from the day, and all the recipes and methods used.   I've already given thanks for support above, but would like to add to this list.   My wife, Alison, took all these photos, bar one obvious one.   She accompanied me all the way to Birmingham and back, and supported and encouraged me all the way.   Also, Mary and Nigel in supplying me the special T65 flour, gave me a chance to put over at least one really top class product.   The white cobs were very fine too, and the sandwich loaves were just about up to scratch.   The wholemeal was poor, and I learnt a lot from this.   I would always take my own preferred choice of flours to a competition in future.   Trying to achieve 72% hydration, and mix in a planetary machine were big mistakes; the BFP flour was not the same spec as the Carrs Mill Race Wholemeal I use in College.   The bloomers "got away on me".   They tasted fantastic, but looked a little bit too ragged.


I'd made 52 loaves in a pretty stressful situation..but, I d had a thoroughly good time and felt totally at home in this rather strange environment.   I want to do this again; it was a lot of fun.   Next time I'll be a lot more organised in the run-in!


 


 


WHOLEMEAL TINNED BREAD


 



Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Recipe [grams]

1. Quarter Sponge

 

 

 

Wholemeal Flour

25

1750

875

Water

17

1190

595

Fresh Yeast

0.2

14

7

TOTAL

42.2

2954

1477

 

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

 

Quarter Sponge [from above]

42.2

2954

1477

Wholemeal Flour

75

5250

2625

Salt

1.8

126

63

Fresh Yeast

2.5

175

87.5

White Fat

1.8

126

63

Water

55[max]

3850

1925

TOTAL

178.3

12481

6240.5

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 2 minutes on first speed, and 6 - 8 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 40 minutes, ambient.   Knock back and rest 10 minutes.
  • Prepare tins, and scale and divide the dough into 950g pieces.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and pan the loaves
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH  for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 235°C, top heat 6 and bottom heat 8.   Use steam set at 2 and keep the damper closed for the first 25 minutes.   Check after 18 minutes, turn the loaf pans round if necessary, and drop the heat to 225°C.   Open the dampers after 25 minutes, drop the heat to 220°C and bake a further 5 - 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

WHITE COB AND BLOOMER

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Eighth Sponge

 

 

Strong White Flour

12.5

875

Water

7.5

525

Fresh Yeast

0.1

7

TOTAL

20.1

1407

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Eighth Sponge [from above]

20.1

1407

Strong White Flour

87.5

6125

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

2.4

168

White Fat

1.0

100

Water

55.5 [max for 63% hydration]

3675 [60%]

3885 [63%]

TOTAL

168.3

11811

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 3 minutes on first speed, and 3½ - 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 1¼ hours, ambient.   Knock back and rest a further 10 mins.
  • Prepare trays with silicone paper dusted with semolina for bloomers, and banneton with white flour for cobs, and scale and divide the dough into 950g pieces for large laves and 480g pieces for small.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape the loaves, tray up the bloomers, and turn the cobs upside down into the banneton.   Recipe yields 4 large and 3 small of each product.
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH  for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated.
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 225°C, top heat 7 and bottom heat 5.   Use steam set at 4 and keep the damper closed for the first 15 minutes.   Use a peel to set the loaves on the sole of the oven; bloomers on silicone, cut whole surface with angled cuts; cobs tipped onto the peel then transfer to oven after cutting, cross shape over whole floured surface.   Check after 20 minutes, to see if the small loaves are baked,   Open the dampers and bake a further 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

WHITE TIINNED BREAD: FARMOUSE and SANDWICH LOAVES

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Third Sponge

 

 

Strong White Flour

33.3

2331

Water

20

1400

Fresh Yeast

0.3

21

TOTAL

53.6

3752

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Third Sponge [from above]

53.6

3752

Strong White Flour

66.7

4669

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

1.7

119

White Fat

1.8

126

Water

43[max]

3010

TOTAL

168.6

11802

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 3 minutes on first speed, and 3½ - 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 40 minutes, ambient.   Knock back and rest 10 minutes.
  • Prepare tins, and scale and divide the dough into 12 x 950g pieces.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and pan the loaves; makes 6 as sandwich loaves and 6 as farmhouse
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated.   Be ready to bake the sandwich ahead of the farmhouse, as these loaves do not need full proof.   Lid the sandwich loaves first; dust the farmhouse loaf tops with white flour, and use a single slash, the full length of the loaf.
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 235°C, top heat 6 and bottom heat 8.   Use steam set at 2 and keep the damper closed for the first 25 minutes.   Check after 18 minutes, turn the loaf pans round if necessary, and drop the heat to 225°C.   Open the dampers after 25 minutes, drop the heat to 220°C and bake a further 5 - 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

TRADITIONAL BAGUETTES MADE WITH A POOLISH

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Poolish

 

 

Campteclair T65 Farine de Tradition

33.3

2331

Water

33.3

2331

Fresh Yeast

0.3

21

TOTAL

66.9

4683

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Poolish [from above]

66.9

4683

Campteclair T65 Farine de Tradition

66.7

4669

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

0.9

63

Water

32.7

2289

TOTAL

169

11830

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt and yeast and mix the final dough for 9 minutes on first speed.   DDT 24°C.
  • Scale the dough into 2 equal portions.   Bulk ferment both portions in oil-lined, covered bowls for 40 minutes.
  • Scale the first portion into 18 x 325g pieces and mould round.   Rest covered for 10 minutes.   Meanwhile, scale the other dough portion into 18 x 325g pieces, and mould round.   Store these covered in the chiller for 2 hours.
  • Once rested, roll out the 18 pieces from the first batch of dough, using a baguette moulder, to 60cm.   Place these onto stick wires and set to prove; 35°C, 85% rH, for 45 mins to 1 hour approx.   Use 6 diagonal cuts just prior to baking.
  • Bake as follows: deck oven, full steam; 240°C, top 6.5, bottom 5, for 20 minutes.   Turn the heat down to 225°C, for 5 minutes.   Open the damper and turn the heat to 215°C and bake a further 5 - 7 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • For the second batch, gradually and carefully, roll each piece out by hand to 60cm.   Set to prove, ambient, en coûche and well covered with cloth and plastic.   Use semolina, as dust, as required.   Try to keep the seal of each baguette on the bottom.   Prove approx 1 hour.   Cut each loaf using a grignette, 6 diagonal slashes.   Set on the sole of the oven using a baguette peel.

Bake profile: as for the first portion of baguettes.   Cool on wires

 

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ananda

 


Caraway Rye Bread.


This is a favourite with my wife, and one I want to truly perfect in the next few months, for "Competition Bread" purposes.   It works as follows: 75% Strong White flour, and 25% Dark Rye in the form of a 15 hour sourdough culture.   Black strap molasses and caraway seeds for flavour; overall, just shy of 65% hydration.


Formulae, method and photographs shown below:


Rye Sourdough Refreshment and Final Dough for 2 large "Miche-style" loaves


Materials, etc.

Formula [% of flour] 

Recipes in Grams

1.First Refreshment: 11.02.2010. 20:30

 

Ferment, ambient for 24 hours [approx 18 - 20°C]

Leaven from stock [wheat: 100 flour, 60 water]

Flour: 7

Water:4.4

50

Flour31, water19

Dark Rye

23

100

Water

34.8

150

TOTAL@ 31°C

69.2

300g

2.Second Refreshment: 12.02.2010. 20:30

 

Ferment, ambient for 15 hours [approx 22°C]

Leaven from above

69.2

300

Dark Rye

70

300

Water

116

500

TOTAL @ 31°C

255.2

1100

 

[Flour 100, Water 155.2]

[Flour 431, Water 669]

3.Final Dough: 13.02.2010. start mixing 11:30, finish 12:20

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

64 [flour 25, water 39]

855 [flour 333, water 522]

Strong White Flour

75

1000

Salt

1.8

24

Caraway Seeds

1.8

24

Black Strap Molasses

8

107

Water @ 40°C

25.8

344

TOTAL

176.4

2354

Notes:

Pre-fermented flour [all rye] 25%

 

 

Overall hydration 64.8%

 

 

Method:

  • Follow the refreshment timetable to create an active culture
  • My kitchen was cool this morning [13°C], and flour and sour very similar [sour actually 18] Addition of cold syrupy molasses, so the water I used was bath temperature; even then the final dough was only 21°C. This is fine, although I would have liked 25; end result 2 hour bulk instead of 1½ hours. Anyway, you end up with a very sticky mass, so here is how to combine materials relatively pain-free. Weigh the hot water, and dissolve the molasses into this. Add this to the sour, and add the salt and caraway seeds. Mix together til blended. Add the white flour and loosely mix. Autolyse 30 minutes. Mix on the bench top, and between the hands in front of you [Andrew Whitley's "Air Kneading"; Breadmatters, 2006]. The Rye and Molasses make it sticky, but the strong flour means it will mix into a strong and developed dough, so persevere. Do not add any flour; that goes without saying, of course!
  • Brush the bowl sparingly with olive oil, and store the dough, covered with plastic sheet for bulk proof in a warm environment. I do this on the hearth, just below and in front of our trusty wood-burning stove.
  • Stretch and fold twice, after 40 minute intervals; see photos.
  • After 2 hours bulk proof, scale and divide and mould. Set to final proof in bannetons, in similar conditions to bulk time.
  • Pre-heat the oven for up to 2 hours to store heat in the bricks. Add boiling water to the roasting pan of hot stones at the oven base, to create steam. Tip the first dough piece onto a pre-heated tray, cut diamond-shapes across the whole crust surface, and place on top of the hot bricks to bake.
  • Turn down the heat on the oven to 200°C after 15 minutes, and slide the dough directly onto the bricks. Use the hot tray to cover the roasting dish and thus prevent further steam formation in the oven chamber. I baked the first loaf [1290g weight] for 45 minutes, and the second loaf took 35 minutes [just over 1050g]
  • Cool on wires.

Photographs , in sequence, are attached below, but no video, as these were made at home.

I also made some Ciabatta with "00" flour, a wheat levain and super-hydration of 85%.   More details to follow; apologies for not quite capturing the full quality of this finished bread.   It is quite superb in terms of flavour.

Best wishes

Andy

 

 

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