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Celebrating Rye Breads

 

This weekend has involved multiple home bakes as I feed up my leavens in preparation for the 2 day “UK Fresh Loaf” course which I will be running at the College on 19th and 20th July.   Many thanks, in particular to ruralidle for suggesting this in the first place, and for his work to make it happen.   It will be my swansong at Newcastle College, as I am leaving at the end of this month in search of more exciting professional adventures in the wake of the savage cuts currently being inflicted across the board by the ruthless and deeply unimaginative Government currently in power over here.   The result is that the College has re-structured to continue to attract sources of funding without being brave enough to find ways to continue to fulfil a key aspect of its traditional role in UK education.   I am not short of ideas and leads, so am optimistic that a far more exciting future lies on the horizon.   The only definite part of the plan is to make sure I complete my MSc in Food Policy between January and August of next year.

So, the show, very much, goes on.   Here are the breads I made at home over Friday, Saturday and Sunday [8th – 10th July], having started refreshing the 2 leavens on Thursday evening, 7th July 2011.

1.    Caraway Rye with Blackstrap Molasses

This is a bread I first developed and made some time ago, not long after joining the TFL community and beginning this Blog.   You can read about it here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16273/carawy-rye-bread-black-strap-molasses-superwet-ciabatta-too  This version is, however, quite different in that the leaven is wheat-based, with Dark Rye being added at the dough stage.   The original used a Rye Sourdough with only wheat flour added to the final dough.   There is half the amount of caraway in this formula, as this is all the stock I currently had in.   More detail on taste is given below.   I made 2 large miche type loaves from this dough; the recipe/formula and method detail are shown below:

Material

Formula [% of Flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Leaven Refreshment One

18:15, Thursday 07.07.2011

 

From Stock

 

40 [25 flour, 15 water]

Marriage’s Strong Organic White Flour

 

100

Water

 

60

TOTAL

 

200

2. Refreshment Two

13:30, Friday 08.07.2011

 

Wheat Leaven

[from above]

 

200

Marriage’s Strong Organic White Flour

 

300

Water

 

180

TOTAL

 

680 [40 retained as stock]

TOTAL used

 

640 [400 flour, 240 water]

3. Final Dough

19:00, Friday 08.07.2011

 

Wheat Leaven

[from above]

40

[25 flour, 15 water]

640

[400 flour, 240 water]

Carrs Special CC Flour

50

800

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye

25

400

Organic Blackstrap Molasses

6.25

100

Salt

1.75

28

Caraway Seeds

0.9

14

Water

50

800

TOTAL

173.9

2782

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

65

-

 

Method:

  • Weigh the dough water, and dissolve molasses and salt into that.   Add the flours and caraway seeds and mix until clear.   Autolyse for one hour.
  • Combine the leaven and autolyse and develop the dough.   As Shiao-Ping originally noted, the empirical feel of the dough is akin to much higher hydration than that actually used.   This is the effect of using molasses and 25% rye flour making the dough very sticky indeed.   Persevere with slow and gentle mixing, avoiding adding any flour at all to the dough.   I used Bertinet’s slap and fold here, mixing for almost an hour, but with lots of resting phases along the way.
  • Bulk ferment for 2 hours
  • Retard for 7 hours, overnight.
  • Scale, divide and mould the dough pieces.   I scaled one at 1550g and the other at 1200g and placed each piece upside down in prepared bannetons.   The large loaf stayed out for proof, and the other went back in the chiller for a further 2 hours to give a manageable production schedule, with the second bread following, then another bread after that.   Final proof time for loaf one was just short of 4 hours, and for loaf two exactly 5 hours.
  • I cut the tops of each loaf with a diamond pattern and set them to bake at 220°C using plenty of steam.   For the bigger loaf, I baked it for 15 minutes at 220°C, then 20 minutes at 200°C, then a further 15 minutes at 180°C.   The smaller loaf baked the same, but for 40 minutes instead of 50 minutes.
  • Finished loaves cooled on wires, as always.   The baked loaves had a finished weight which showed moisture loss of just under 10%.   I achieved a core temperature of 96°C for both loaves.

Some photographs of the finished loaf are shown below.   Regarding analysis of the finished bread, this is one of Alison’s absolute favourite loaves.   There is sourness and bitterness coming from the rye and molasses.   There is sweetness too, and plenty of aroma from the caraway.   The crumb colour is particularly lovely, and the moistness brings great pleasure to the final eating quality.   We took one of these loaves along as a gift to some friends’ house last night, as we had been invited round for dinner.   That was the first chance we had to sample the bread, but we had a slice each for breakfast this morning, with just a thin coating of butter.

 

2.    Borodinsky – The Auerman Formula [or thereabouts anyway]

I have now tracked down a supply of Red Malt, and managed to find a way to fit the more complex 3-stage build used for this bread into my home schedule for the last couple of days.   It’s something I have long wanted to do, have been slightly taken to task for previously on TFL, and am really happy with the finished result; subject to tasting and crumb analysis which I have yet to carry out.

I made one large loaf, in a Pullman Pan, weighing just over 1660g

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour Refreshment

18:15, Thursday 07.07.2011

 

From Stock

 

70 [26 flour, 44 water]

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

60

Water

 

100

TOTAL

 

230

 

 

 

2. Full Sour

13:00, Friday 08.07.2011

 

Rye Sour from above

 

230

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

180

Water

 

300

TOTAL

 

710 [38 retained as stock]

TOTAL used

80 [30 flour, 50 water]

672 [252 flour, 400 water]

 

 

 

3. “Scald”

22:30, Friday 08.07.2011

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

20

168

Red Malt

5

42

Organic Blackstrap Molasses

6

50

Coriander, freshly ground

1

8

Salt

1

8

Boiling Water

35

294

TOTAL

68

570

 

 

 

4. “Sponge”

23:30, Friday 08.07.2011

 

Rye Sourdough [from 2]

80 [30 flour, 50 water]

672 [252 flour, 400 water]

Scald [from 3]

68

570

TOTAL

148

1242

 

 

 

5. Final Paste

07:30 Saturday 09.07.2011

 

Sponge [from 4]

148

1242

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

23.5

197

Carrs Special CC Flour

26.5

223

TOTAL

198

1662

% pre-fermented flour

50

30 from sour + 20 from scald to make “sponge”

% overall hydration

85

-

 

Method:

  • Refresh the rye sour as directed in the table above.
  • Make the “scald” as follows: Weigh the red malt and dark rye flour into a bowl, add the salt, and coriander, which should be freshly ground using a mortar and pestle.   Weight the molasses into a pan, and pour boiling water onto this to the specified weight.   Bring this to a rolling boil on the cooker hob top.   Pour onto the dry ingredients and combine well with a stout plastic or wooden spatula.   Add any extra boiling water required first by checking the weight of the contents to allow for any evaporation.   Cool the scald as rapidly as possible down to a maximum temperature of 45°C.   This took an hour.
  • Combine the scald and the full sour to form the sponge.   Leave this to ferment for 5½ hours.   I then retarded it a further 2 hours, as it was 05:00 and I needed a bit more sleep!
  • Add the 2 remaining portions of flour to the sponge to form the final paste
  • Prove in bulk for 1½ hours, and meanwhile prepare a large Pullman Pan by lining it with silicone paper.
  • Pan the paste, smooth it off and dust the top with a sprinkling of freshly ground coriander.   Put the lid on the Pan and set for final proof for 2 hours.
  • Use a pan of water in the oven and set to bake at 160°Cfor 2 hours, with a gentle supply of steam, topped up as needed.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.   The finished weight of the cooled bread was 1400g, indicating a weight loss of 15.8%.   This means that the moisture retained within the bread remains at just under 70% of the flour, and equates to 35% of the total weight of the finished bread!

Notes:

  • Red Malt: this is derived from malted barley, ground to a fine powder.   I believe it has been lightly roasted to the levels which would be known in the brewing industry as “Crystal Malt”.   In terms of amylase, it makes no contribution, as the grain has been roasted at too high a temperature for the enzymes to survive.   I suspect the Russian version would use rye as the source, rather than barley, but this is as close as I can get at the moment.   It looks like this:

  • Constructing the Scald:   I did this exactly the same as I have done it in the past, except for using the red malt instead of the barley malt syrup which I have previously had to use as an alternative.   The formula does not use molasses or salt in the scald.   The reason I added the molasses at this stage is because I did not want to use sugar in the formula, as the “official” recipe directs.   Adding molasses to the final paste would be a difficult mixing process, as there is no liquid added at this stage to use to dissolve the molasses into.
  • Additionally, the sponge process had to be left for longer than the 4 hours directed in the formula, on account of me requiring a bit more sleep.   So I added the salt in the hope it would retard the ferment.   I also hoped that the level of molasses in the formula would be sufficiently high to have a slight retarding effect too.   In the event, I woke up 5 hours into the final fermenting phase, and stored the sponge in the fridge to retard it for just over 2 hours before getting up to make the final paste.   This worked very well; some pictures of the dark and rich “sponge” are attached here.

  • Undoubtedly this is the best version of this bread I have made.   You can reach your own conclusions about the origins of the term “Borodinsky” from the various stories uncovered in the research posted above.   I’ve never been to Russia, and have no idea what the “official” Borodinsky produced in Soviet times, or, the older, traditional loaf of its type tasted or looked like.   This version is stunning.   The bitter/sweet flavours are intense, the crumb is DARK, and very moist.   For all that, it is very easy to eat, and intensely “moreish”!
  • References: there is more information about the Borodinsky formula given below.   Some of these are taken from previous discussion threads of interest on TFL.   This one http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/11812/rye-amylase is of interest in that discussion is given over to the part played by the scald in the formula, and the extent to which the water should be heated before it is poured onto the flour.   Here, I am left wondering if the key purpose of the scald is to fully gelatinise the starches in order to encourage maximum liquid take up in the final formula?   Or, have I still not got this part right, and missed that the scald is actually a “mash” and not a “boil up”?   Informative further discussion on mash chemistry and its potential impact here would be much appreciated.
  • I did then go on to complete the process as outlined originally by Borodin, by combining the sour and scald.   However, I wonder if, because my scald was a “boil-up”, and not a “mash”, whether that meant the sponge would not work exactly as intended, and as outlined here in an earlier post on the referenced thread: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/11812/rye-amylase#comment-66360
  • Two clear derivations are offered for Borodinsky bread, and this topic seems to spark off heated debate about what is the “true” Borodinsky.   Is it a black bread created in the immediate aftermath of the Battle of Borodino, to celebrate the Russian army success in 1812?   Or, is it the heavily prescribed Soviet bread of the GOST standards, as referenced here:  http://www.borodinsky.com/recipe/index-r.html  on this thread: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20370/russian-sourdough-no-more   My attempt here was to re-produce the latter style, and I acknowledge I have not been entirely successful.   Some of this is deliberate…avoiding sugar, and replacing it with molasses.   The story on the zavarkha is another matter.   Can anyone provide further detail on whether the process is carried out primarily to mash, or, to gelatinise?   That would be much appreciated; if we can avoid derogatory comments this time, that would be all the better.
  • For further information, I highly recommend reading the various discussion posts here: http://www.foodbanter.com/baking To do this, you will have to register.   Then use the “Search” tab in the top menu, and type “Borodinsky” into the search box when it comes up.   Select the threads you want to see from there.

For information on the very precise rye bread recipes from the Soviet era, see this table here: http://www.indiana.edu/~pollang/Russian_bread_table.pdf

I would like to dedicate this bread and post to my friend and TFL colleague Daisy_A, and pass on all good wishes for a speedy recovery, as I know you are having an operation on one of your eyes round about now.   Your intellect shines through in some of the passages referenced above and these typify the enormous cultural contribution you make to the pages of TFL.   “Get well soon!”

 

3.    Pain de Campagne with mixed levains

Just a quick one, to give me an excuse to feed up the rye sour and wheat levain one more time.   Recipe/formula and method below for one large loaf in a banneton.   The refreshment programme for the 2 leavens is not given, however, I used the cultures leftover from the previous 2 doughs, fed them each once more, and used these to make this bread, returning small amounts of each to stock for re-generation.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Wheat Levain

36.1 [22.5 flour, 13.6 water]

256 [160 flour, 96 water]

Rye Sourdough

36.6 [14.1 flour, 22.5 water]

260 [100 flour, 160 water

White Bread Flour

63.4

450

Salt

1.7

12

Water

31.8

226

TOTAL

169.6

1204

% pre-fermented flour

36.6

-

% overall hydration

67.9

-

 

Method:

  • Combine all the items in the table in a bowl to form a dough.   Mix by hand on the bench for 15 minutes.
  • Retard overnight in the fridge.
  • Mould round and place upside down in a prepared banneton.
  • Prove for 5 hours
  • Score the top of the loaf, and bake in a pre-heated oven with steam, for 45 minutes.
  • Cool on wires.

A somewhat less detailed formula to finish with.   Photographs of the crust and crumb are here.   The loaf has gentle flavours in comparison to the full-on tastes of the other 2 breads.

Happy Baking!

Andy

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Rye Sourdough with a Sunflower and Pumpkin Seed Cold Soaker

 

I made these as panned loaves, as seeded bread makes such wonderful sandwiches.   The leaven is a rye sour which I refreshed a couple of times and fed with some “altus” along the way too.   So, the figures for flour in the built sour will actually include a small amount of “altus”, which I have not declared in the formula below.   I soaked the seeds overnight for the Soaker.

I scaled one dough piece @ 465g to make a small tinned loaf, and then used the remaining dough [just over 1500g] to make a loaf in the Pullman Pan, moulded using “4-piecing” rather than the single piece method.   See this post for a video of me using this method: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23225/three-flavoured-breads-and-few-fruit-scones

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Built Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

12

120

Water

20

200

TOTAL

32

320

 

 

 

2. Cold Soaker

 

 

Sunflower Seeds

12

120

Pumpkin Seeds

12

120

Salt

0.5

5

Water

30

300

TOTAL

54.5

545

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

32

320

Seed Soaker [from above]

54.5

545

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

88

880

Salt

1.7

17

Water

27

270

TOTAL

203.2

2032

% pre-fermented flour

12

-

Overall % hydration on flour

77

% Hydration on flour plus seeds

62.1

 

Method:

  • Pour off any remaining liquor from the soaker, and set the seeds to one side.
  • To the liquor, add the remaining required water, the rye sourdough and the flour.   Bring this together, then set aside for 1 hour “autolyse”.
  • Develop this dough by mixing gently for 5 minutes.   Add the salt and mix a further 5 minutes.   Rest the dough for 10 minutes.   Mix it a further 5 minutes, then add the seeds and complete the mixing gently by hand.   If the seeds are still not evenly distributed, then use a metal “Scotch” cutter to cut through the dough a few times to aid better distribution.
  • Ferment the dough in bulk for 2½ hours, with one fold after 1½ hours.
  • Scale and divide as 1 x 465g for the small tin loaf, and 4 x 390g for the Pullman Pan.
  • Mould each piece round and rest 10 minutes, covered.   Apply final shaping, brush the dough tops with water, and dip into the remaining seeds combined.    Pan the dough pieces and set to prove, covered.
  • Final proof is 3 hours.   I did not use a lid on the Pullman Pan for this loaf.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 220°C.   Use steam and set the loaf tins to bake in the middle of the oven.   Bake the small loaf for 25 minutes.   Drop the heat to 200°C and bake out the Pullman Pan loaf a further 35 minutes.   Drop the heat to 180°C along the way, if necessary to prevent the seeds on top from becoming too dark.
  • Cool on wires.

 

This is one of the tastiest loaves imaginable.   There is virtually no sourness, but the seeds, the long fermentation and the bake profile all combine to create a bread soo very tasty!

Here are some photographs, plus the cat!   The sun’s back a bit more often just now, too!

 

All good wishes

Andy

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Double Pains de Campagne, Olive Levain and a “Hardcore Borodinsky”

One large Boule, proved in a banneton, of just over 1300g, and one of 700g, proved in a brotform.

Olive Levain takes its inspiration from the Hamelman (2004) version on pp. 178 – 179, but with changes sufficient for me to feel happy publishing the formula and method I have devised.

As if Borodinsky isn’t hardcore with an 80:20 Rye: Wheat mix, this is all Dark Rye Flour!

Here’s the detail of the leaven refreshment used for the stiff levain used in the Pain de Campagne and Olive Levain.   Bonus of being able to make a couple of Naan breads with the leaven after first build to accompany yesterday’s evening meal of saag dal and aloo gobhi and brinjal curry.

Material

Recipe [grams]

1. Leaven Build One [Friday; 19:00]

 

Leaven from Stock

80 [50 flour: 30 water]

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

100

Water

60

TOTAL

240

Reserved to make Naan Breads

210

2. Leaven Build Two [Saturday; 14:00]

 

Leaven [from above]

30 [19 flour: 11 water]

Organic White Flour

300

Water

180

TOTAL

510

 

 

3. Leaven Build Three [Saturday; 20:00]

 

Leaven from above

510 [319 flour: 191 water]

Organic White Flour

300

Water

180

TOTAL

990

4. Retarded overnight for use Sunday morning

110 back to stock

Leaven in Pain de Campagne

720 [450 flour: 270 water]

Leaven in Olive Levain

160 [100 flour: 60 water]

 

 

  1. 1.    Pain de Campagne

High percentage of pre-fermented flour in a really strong, stiff wheat leaven.   Dark Rye added at just over 9% of total flour.   Two loaves, scaled as mentioned above.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Leaven [see above]

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

37.5

450

Water

22.5

270

TOTAL

60

720

 

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

53.33

640

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

9.17

110

Salt

1.75

21

Water

45.5

546

TOTAL

169.75

2037

% pre-fermented flour

37.5

-

Overall % hydration

68

-

 

Method:

  • Autolyse the 2 flours with the water for half an hour.
  • Mix the dough by adding the leaven to the autolyse and developing for 10 minutes.   Rest for 10 minutes; add the salt and develop a further 10 minutes.
  • Bulk Ferment for 2¼ hours.
  • Scale and divide for 2 boules as described above.   Shape and place upside down in the banneton and brotform.   Retard for 2 hours in the chiller.
  • Final proof for 1½ hours.
  • Tip the largest loaf out, cut the top and bake with steam in a pre-heated oven [250*C] for 55 minutes.   Drop the oven temperature as needed through the bake, ending up around 200*C, depending on your oven.  Cool on wires and bake the smaller loaf for 25 minutes again, cut the loaf and utilise steam.   Cool on wires.

 

  1. 2.    Olive Levain

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Leaven [see above]

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

100

Water

12

60

TOTAL

32

160

 

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

72

360

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

8

40

Salt

1.2

6

Water

51

255

Pitted Black Olives

25

125

TOTAL

189.2

946

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

Overall % Hydration

63

-

 

Method:

  • Dry the Pitted Olives with paper towel.
  • Mix the leaven with all the other ingredients except the olives.   Develop for 10 minutes, then rest 10 minutes, develop a further 10 minutes and rest 10 more minutes.
  • Chop the olives into the dough with a metal cutter.
  • Bulk Proof for 3 hours.
  • Shape and prove in a banneton for 2½ hours.
  • Tip out the dough piece, cut the top and bake in a pre-heated oven [250°C] using steam, for 45 minutes, dropping the oven temperature to 200°C as the bake progresses.
  • Cool on wires.

 

  1. 3.    “Hardcore Borodinsky”

I have been out of stock of the Bacheldre Dark Rye, so my rye sour was in need of some “tlc” before I could bake with it.   I used a 2 stage refreshment process, and incorporated some “altus” as part of the second refreshment.   I used some old Borodinsky as the “altus”.   This was left overnight for a full 15 hours to ripen.

Material

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour First Build; Friday 19:00

 

Rye Sourdough stock

16

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

50.25

Water

83.75

TOTAL

150

 

 

2. Rye Sour Second Build; Saturday 14:30

 

Rye Sourdough from above

150

“Altus” – Old Bread

50

Soaking Water

100

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

200

Water

300

TOTAL

800

 

As usual, I made a “scald” for this loaf the evening before, as follows:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

20

192

Organic Barley Malt Syrup

4.5

43

Organic Black Strap Molasses

6

58

Coriander freshly ground

1

9.6

Salt

1

9.6

Boiling Water

35

336

TOTAL

67.5

648

 

Method:

  • Dissolve the syrups in the boiling water and bring to a rolling boil in a pan
  • Crush the Coriander Seeds using a Mortar and Pestle
  • Combine spice with salt and flour and pour on the boiling wort.
  • Mix to a stiff paste, cover, and cool overnight.

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour [as above[

 

 

Dark Rye [plus a little “altus”]

30

288

Water

50

480

TOTAL

80

768

 

 

 

2. “Scald” [as above]

67.5

648

3. Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

50

480

TOTAL

197.5

1896

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

Overall % Hydration

85

-

 

Method:

  • Blend the scald into the sourdough.
  • Combine this with the remaining flour.
  • Bulk ferment for 1 hour
  • Prepare a Pullman Pan and drop the shaped paste into the pan.
  • Prove for 3 hours until the dough is near the top of the pan.
  • Close the lid of the pan and bake in an oven pre-heated to 160°C with generous steam, very gently for 2½ hours.
  • Cool on wires.

 

The production schedule worked well for these loaves, with some retarding for the 2 Pains de Campagne.   I woke early, so I did make the Borodinsky at 05:30.   It’s a stressful time just now!

 

Lots of photographs are attached.   I apologise that they are indoor shots.   The weather here is very poor, with lots of heavy showers, and black skies leaving all our rooms very dark indeed.   Just no chance to get outside, despite very occasional glimpses of sunshine!

Very best wishes to all

Andy

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Miche using a Stiff Levain and Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

Leaven Build

Material

Recipe [grams]

1. Leaven Build One

Thursday 18:00

Leaven

80

White Bread Flour

[Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour]

100

Water

60

TOTAL

240

 

 

2. Leaven Build Two

Thursday 23:00

Refrigerated @02:30 Fri

Leaven from above

240

White Bread Flour

150

Water

90

TOTAL

480

 

Final Dough Formula

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Leaven from above

    Flour: 27

+ Water: 16.

     Total: 43

   240

+ 144

    384

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

73

660

Salt

1.78

16

Water

62

558

TOTAL

179.78

1618

Overall Pre-fermented Flour

27

-

Overall Hydration

78

-

Flour Mix

27% White Bread Flour

73% High Extraction Flour

-

 

 

Method:

  • Combine the flour for the final dough with the water and autolyse refrigerated overnight, Thursday.
  • Friday morning; combine the autolyse with the leaven and work up the dough for 3 minutes.   Add the salt and develop a further 3 minutes.   Rest for 15 minutes.   Develop a further 5 minutes.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours.   Stretch & Fold every 20 minutes.
  • Mould gently round and place upside down in a prepared Banneton
  • Final proof in Bannetons for 2 hours
  • Bake Profile for the one large loaf: I loaded the loaf, once tipped out and cut, into an oven at 250°C and utilised steam.   After 15 minutes I turned the heat down to 220°C.   After another 20 minutes I turned the heat down to 200°C and baked the loaf out a further 20 minutes.   Then I left the loaf in the oven, switched off, with the door propped open.   Finally I cooled the loaf on wires before the inevitable photo shoot.

 

Notes:

  • Where the previous loaves using this cold process took 7 hours to prove, this loaf was ready in just 4 hours.   Here are the reasons why:
    1. The hot weather has returned and our kitchen has maintained a steady 28°C all daylong in the sunshine: FAB!
    2. The high hydration of the dough
    3. The dough contains a lot of high extraction flour with considerable increase in enzymatic activity
    4. There is slightly more pre-fermented flour in this formula, and my leaven has been enjoying a lot of activity, and, therefore big feedings, of late
  • Photographs: lots of them, and I am really pleased with these.   What a difference it makes to be able to take snapshots outside in the sun!
  • The bread; I am soo pleased with this too!   The flavour is quite lovely.   A hint of sourness, not too obvious.   Lots of caramel notes from that dark crust.   The interior is chewy and robust, but just open enough to prevent it being too heavy.
  • So this is it: how to make a Miche using genuine High Extraction flour!   AND, the flour comes from Organic Sativa Wheat, traditional tall stem variety, utterly untampered with by any genetic fiend, and grown on a family farm in Northumberland UK.   Stoneground on the only newly-installed traditional milling system to be opened in Northumberland in over 150 years.   Thank you Andrew Wilkinson!   High protein for sure, but put this side-by-side with any industrial bread flour and there is such a contrast in gluten potential.
  • I suppose I could look at feeding the leaven with the Gilchesters Pizza/Ciabatta flour to create a 100% local flour loaf.   But the leaven would be so much less tolerant, and I am not sure I’d feel confident about being able to keep all the enzyme activity in control.

 

Very best wishes from a Happy Bunny!

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Pain de Campagne using a Stiff Wheat Levain and a portion of Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

Leaven Build

Material

Recipe [grams]

1. Leaven Build One

Saturday, 15:00

Refrigerate Overnight

Leaven

60

White Bread Flour

[Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour]

100

Water

60

TOTAL

220

 

 

2. Leaven Build Two

Sunday, 11:00

Leaven from above

220

White Bread Flour

100

Water

60

TOTAL

380

 

 

3. Leaven Build Three

Sunday, 19:00

Refrigerate Overnight

Leaven from above

380

White Bread Flour

200

Water

120

TOTAL

700

 

Final Dough Formula

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Leaven from above

   Flour:  22.22

+ Water: 13.33

     Total: 35.55

   400

+ 240

    640

Carrs Special CC Flour

50

900

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

27.78

500

Salt

1.78

32

Water

55.56

1000

TOTAL

170.76

3072

Overall Pre-fermented Flour

22.22

-

Overall Hydration

68.89

-

Flour Mix

72.22% White Bread Flour

27.78% High Extraction Flour

-

 

 

Method:

  • Combine both flours with the water and autolyse refrigerated overnight
  • Combine the autolyse with the leaven and work up the dough for 3 minutes.   Add the salt and develop a further 3 minutes.   Rest for 15 minutes.   Develop a further 5 minutes.
  • Bulk proof for 3 hours.   One S&F after 2hours.
  • Scale and divide into 3 pieces: 1 x 650g, 1 x 930g and the remainder, 1492g
  • Final proof in Bannetons for 4 hours
  • Bake Profile for the largest loaf, I loaded the loaf, once tipped out and cut, into an oven at 250°C and utilised steam.   After 15 minutes I turned the heat down to 220°C.   After another 20 minutes I turned the heat down to 200°C and baked the loaf out a further 20 minutes.   Then I left the loaf in the oven, switched off, with the door propped open.   Finally I cooled the loaf on wires before the inevitable photo shoot.

 

One note: a long proof, accounted for by use of refrigerated autolyse and leaven.   The dough proof temperature ranged between 18 and 23°C.   Seven hours of total proving was just about right; the percentage of pre-fermented flour is reduced on most of the breads of this nature which I have been baking recently   Photographs are shown below; tastings have not yet been carried out.

 

Very best wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Already the freezer stock of bread is running low, but the supply of Bacheldre Dark Rye and Gilchester Pizza Flour is just about exhausted.   There was enough to make a refreshed Rye Sourdough, but the wheat levain needed to be switched over to an alternative flour for its second refreshment to build up the amount needed to make these 2 loaves.   The rye sour had one refreshment from stock; the wheat levain had two refreshments.   There is still some Gilchester Farmhouse flour [c.85% extraction] in the cupboard, so I built this into the final formula for the bread, and used it in the Ginger Cake described below.

Two Large Boules

Alison found some Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour for me on Saturday, so the levain build was complete, and I could start dough mixing this morning [Sunday].   Here is the recipe, formula and method:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour dough

 

 

Bacheldre Dark Rye

4

60

Water

6.67

100

TOTAL

10.67

160

2. Wheat Levain

 

 

Gilchesters Organic Pizza & Ciabatta  Flour/ Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

26.67

400

Water

16

240

TOTAL

42.67

640

3. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sour [above]

10.67

160

Wheat Levain [above]

42.67

640

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

53.33

800

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

16

240

Salt

1.8

27

Water

45.33

680

TOTAL

169.8

2547

Overall Pre-fermented Flour

30.67

-

Overall Hydration

68

-

Wholegrain: White

30:70

-

 

Method:

  • Autolyse flours, water and rye sour for 1 hour
  • Add levain and form dough.   Add salt and develop.
  • Rest for 15 minutes, then mix a further 10 minutes.
  • S&F after 1 hour.   Bulk Proof 2 hours.   Knock back after 1½ hours, gently.
  • Scale and divide.   I made 1 boule @ 1000g and 1 just over 1500g.   Carefully mould dough pieces.
  • Proof upside down in bannetons for c.3 hours.
  • Tip out of the bannetons, cut the top of the loaves and bake in a pre-heated oven with steam.   I baked the 1.5kg loaf for 1 hour and the 1kg loaf for just less than 45 minutes.
  • Cool on wires

The steam has given these loaves a lovely shiny appearance.   They are quite bold and have expanded well around the cuts.   The crust has a few cracks appearing.   The crumb gives evidence of well developed dough and proper attention to fermentation.   We are both looking forward to a week of enticing sandwiches for lunch.   Photographs shown below:

 

Spicy Ginger Cake

The British contingent here may have come across Dan Lepard’s “Honey and Treacle Cake” in The Guardian Weekend Magazine on Saturday.   I’m quite a fan of these “blended” Ginger cakes, and one of my students made Dan Lepard’s “Whisky Ginger Cake” [see his website for this one] in the Confectionery exam last Monday…and it really is loaded with alcohol too!

Alison saw this article and decided it was a healthy option because it had no refined sugar in the recipe!!?   Well, this is my take on it, although the Mascarpone and Orange Icing  is down to Alison.   It’s very spicy and full-on ginger.   The finished cake texture is exactly how I like to eat cake; you decide for yourselves.

Recipe, formula and method are shown below.   I’ve made a good few changes to the recipe published in the Guardian, so I’m happy to list it below as my own take.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Organic Honey

 

125

Blackstrap Molasses

154.3

70

Ginger Syrup

 

75

Butter

86

150

Black Peppercorns

 

7

Cloves

16

7

Mace

 

7

Ginger Powder

 

7

Eggs

86

150

Orange Zest

0.6

1

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

100

175

Baking Powder

5.7

10

Stem Ginger [diced]

172

220

Dried Fruit

 

81

TOTAL

620.3

1085

It is not so clear in the table above, but I have tried to show the formula in relation  to constituent parts, so 16% is proportion of spice, and 154.3 is proportion of syrups, both to flour.   Fruit is 172% of flour; this could perhaps be lower 

Method:

  • Gently heat the sugars, butter and whole spices to 80°C in a pan.
  • Lightly beat the egg
  • Sift together the flour, baking powder and ginger powder.
  • Strain the syrups off the whole spices.   Add zest plus dry ingredients and fold to form a smooth batter.   Fold in the egg.   Fold in the fruit.
  • Scale equally between 2 loaf tins.   Bake at 160°C for 40 minutes
  • Cool on wires.

Photographs of the finished crumb are shown.   Lovely cake, but neither of us ever really eat much of the stuff; let’s hope it will keep the week in the fridge?

Best wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

                                                               

Seeded Rye Hot Soaker Boules.

Pain de Siègle style of loaf, baked in a Sandwich Tin

The local flour theme continues….

After 2 recent homebaking sessions, my wheat levain has now joined the rye sour; both are built from traditional, local and organic flours.

I made 3 boules using a seeded rye hot soaker with a wheat leaven, a very simple formula for a sandwich bread, leavened with rye sour, and using the Gilchesters Farmhouse in the final dough with an 85% hydration! [Think high extraction flour here!]   Oh! We had the family round today, so I also made pizzas with homemade tomato sauce with garden herbs, and a variety of lovely toppings [from: artichokes, capers, olives, anchovies, flaked salmon, fresh basil, buffalo mozzarella or creamy Lancashire cheese.   The dough was made with a stiff wheat levain [60% hydration, just 20% pre-fermented flour], overall dough hydration was just over 76%.   No photos, sorry; but I made them as 3 tray-baked, skinny bottomed, hence crisp based, pizzas.   I gave the finished dough about 8 hours slow proof in the fridge before rolling out the bases and docking them prior to topping and baking.

  1. 1.    Seeded Rye Hot Soaker Boules

I built the leaven with 3 refreshments.   Final amounts of flour and water only are shown, but I started with 80g levain and refreshed from there.

I made 3 boules: 1 @ 1.5kg, 1 @700g and 1 @ 940g

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

20

300

Water

12

180

TOTAL

32

480

 

 

 

2. Seeded Rye Hot Soaker

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye

13.3

200

Pumpkin Seeds

6.7

100

Sesame Seeds

11.3

170

Salt

1.7

26

Boiling Water

37.6

564

TOTAL

70.6

1060

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

32

480

Hot soaker [from above]

70.6

1060

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

60

900

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

6.7

100

Water

45

600

TOTAL

214.3

3140

Overall Pre-fermented Flour

20

 

Overall Hydration

94.6 on flour

[80.2% with seeds]

 

Method:

  • Make the hot soaker and final refreshment of the levain the night before, about 6 hours ahead of use if possible.   Cover and leave ambient.
  • Mix the soaker with the flour and water needed for the final dough.   Once properly combined, leave covered on the bench for 1 hour.   Add the leaven and work up to a soft dough.   Brush the bench with a little olive oil, to allow the dough to rest and condition, covered.   Leave 3 hours, using S&F regularly to develop the dough.
  • Scale and divide as desired and mould dough pieces round.   Brush the tops with a little water, and dip into a seed mixture.
  • Prove upside down in Bannetons for 3 hours.
  • Bake in a pre-heated oven with masonry, and utilise steam.
  • Cool on wires

 

  1. 2.    Pain de Siègle in a Sandwich Tin

A really simple formula.   The rye sourdough was given 2 refreshments over 2 days.   The only flour in the final dough was Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse flour, which I am informed has an extraction rate of c.85%, and is beautifully milled.   The hydration overall is an impressive 85%, and I was able to mould this loaf just before panning!   Not bad when the weight is over 1.5kg!

Again, figures for flour and water totals only are given for the sour.   The recipe made 1 large loaf in a Pullman Pan.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye

25

210

Water

41.7

350

TOTAL

66.7

560

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

66.7

560

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

630

Salt

1.8

15

Water

43.2

363

TOTAL

186.7

1550

 

Method

  • Use autolyse principle, to combine flour and water with the sour, and leave, covered, for ½  hour.
  • Add the salt and mix the soft dough to strengthen.   I used a small hand mixer with hook attachments.
  • Bulk prove for 1 hour
  • Use scant flour to mould and shape the dough piece for panning.
  • Prove for 3 hours
  • Bake for 1½ to 1¾ hours at 190°C with steam.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

Further thoughts:

  • Flavour and performance in these doughs are both significantly improved on the last attempts with all local flour.   The high ash content dictates generous hydration levels, but also necessitates a reduction in the amount of pre-fermented flour.   The wheat leaven needs to be less ripe than my previous effort.   This time, I had it about right.
  • The leaven is stiff, as the flour is thirsty, so 60% is less than generous hydration, but it gives greater tolerance in terms of fermentation rates.   I suspect a leaven made with the Farmhouse flour may need 70% hydration, so fermentation may be over rapid to give the best dough quality possible.
  • Photographs of all products, crust and crumb are attached; my apologies, they are not the best shots I've ever taken, it has to be said!

All good wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 


DSCF2125Baking with All-British FlourDSCF2144


Given that Rye Flour is not so common in UK shops as Wheat Flour, when one finds it, it is far more likely to be of British origin, and often, Organic too.   The Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour from a Welsh watermill is now the only flour I use to keep my rye sourdough culture properly fed.   It is very dark, coarse, highly fermentable and thirsty, and produces breads of outstanding flavour.   The Doves Farm Organic Light Rye is less impressive in these areas, but, its performance in producing a better dough structure is undeniable.


DSCF2131DSCF2132


I'm trying to work towards using my local miller as a source for all the wheatflour I use at home.   It means karting 7kg of flour at a time on the train back home, but I am feeling the need to move away from relying on industrially-milled flour, and come up with exceptional bread quality on all levels, using locally-grown organic flour from traditional sources.   I achieved mixed success with this round of baking, but have produced much that I am very happy with, and a clear direction of the changes needed to induce improvement, and ultimately, fulfilment in the project.


DSCF2127DSCF2129


•1.    All-British flour and 2 LeavensDSCF2138


Here is the formula for a bread dough raised with 2 leavens, and using only British Organic flour from traditional sources.



Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour Elaboration 1

 

 

Stock Rye Sourdough

 

20

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

60

Water

 

100

TOTAL

 

180

 

 

 

2. Wheat Levain Elaboration 1

 

 

Stock Wheat Levain

 

54

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

 

100

Water

 

60

TOTAL

 

214

 

 

 

3. Rye Sour Elaboration 2

 

 

Elaboration 1 [above]

 

180

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

150

Water

 

250

TOTAL

29.63

580

 

 400g retained

180g returned to stock

4. Wheat Levain Elaboration 2

 

 

Elaboration 1 [above]

 

214

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

 

200

Water

 

120

TOTAL

35.56

534

 

 480g retained

54g returned to stock

5. FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Rye Sourdough [above, 3.]

29.63

[11.11flour, 18.52water]

400

Wheat Levain [above, 4]

35.56

[22.22flour, 13.34water]

480

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

48.15

650

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

18.52

250

Salt

1.2

16

Water

38.14

515

TOTAL

171.2

2311

Overall % Pre-fermented Flour

33.3

 

Overall % Hydration

70

 

 

Method:

  • Elaboration One on Saturday evening, 19:00. Elaboration Two Sunday morning 09:00
  • Dough mixed Sunday 17:00. Initial Bulk Proof for 2½ hours. Retard overnight.
  • Divide and shape 08:00 Monday. Set to prove in Bannetons
  • After cutting, bake using steam and masonry at 13:00
  • Cool on wires.

DSCF2124DSCF2139DSCF2137DSCF2143

 

Notes:

  • Too much pre-fermented flour, all-told in the formula. The rye sour needed rescuing, but was good by the time of dough mixing, and added at the right quantity. The wheat leaven was too ripe, and too much added. There is need to take account of the greater ash content in this flour; even though it is labelled "Pizza/Ciabatta" flour, it can hardly be described as "00"! The colour is a greyish white.
  • I did not want to retard overnight, but had little choice. The rye sour needed some care and attention. As a result the wheat leaven was over-ripe, and it was early evening, so I had to retard, rather than stay up until 4 in the morning!
  • I miscalculated the salt! At 1.8% on flour, there should have been just over 24g added. This is extremely significant in terms of the dough performance.
  • I adjusted the water level upward, only slightly, but feel 70% is the best proportion of water to be adding to this flour
  • Some information from the flour bags is attached in photographic form. Please do not take any notice of the claim that this is "Strong" flour. High protein [and mineral content], most certainly. High in gluten forming proteins, definitely not! Personally, I wish this claim had never been included in the marketing of this flour. It may well cause numerous customers to be seriously put-off from buying in the future. I want to learn how to make good bread with this flour, and I know it does not possess some of the properties most often associated with strong bread flour. However, I know it is possible, and now know and understand the significance of the notes I have listed above.
  • I have been further reflecting on the use of utterly untreated flour. Thus creating a thoroughly different animal for the baker to deal with. How to up the ante, and increase skill and knowledge levels to retain control of the fermentation and dough development when adding in all the further variables of a less consistent performance in the flour. This is to be the new "bar" to jump over.
  • Onward and upward in the future!

 

 

•2.    BorodinskyDSCF2149

Once rescued, I gave the rye sour dough one further elaboration, prepared a scald, and readied myself to make a large batch of this paste; very nearly 4kg...by hand!

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough [elab 3]

 

 

Stock after Elaboration 2

 

180

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

532.5

Water

 

887.5

TOTAL

80 [30flour, 50water]

1600

Note: further leftover for stock

 

[80]

 

 

 

2. Scald

 

 

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

20

400

Organic Barley Malt Syrup

4.5

90

Organic Blackstrap Molasses

6

120

Coriander [ground fresh]

1

20

Salt

1

20

Boiling Water

35

700

TOTAL

67.5

1350

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

80

1600

Scald [from above]

67.5

1350

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

17.5

350

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

12.5

250

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

20

400

TOTAL

197.5

3950

Overall Pre-fermented Flour

30

 

Overall Hydration

85

 

 

Method:

  • Give 3rd elaboration to rye sourdough and leave to ferment through for 14 hours. At the same time make the scald. Add molasses and malt syrup to boiled water in a pan and return to the boil. Pour this onto the flour, salt and coriander and mix to form a stiff, gelatinised paste. Cover well, and leave to cool overnight.
  • Mix the final paste by combining the liquid sour with the stiff scald. Add the remaining flour and form a paste. See photographs for texture.
  • Bulk prove 1 hour, then scale and mould into tins using wet hands to shape.
  • Proof for 3 - 4 hours before baking in a moderate oven for 2 hours and upwards
  • Cool on wires
  • Note that I made one loaf in a Pullman Pan scaled off at 2kg, one loaf in "Farmhouse" tin, scaled off at 1.3kg, with the residual 650g proved in a small brotform, although it did, sadly, stick somewhat!

Photographs of the finished loaves are all attached.

DSCF2121DSCF2116DSCF2135DSCF2147DSCF2154

Best wishes to you all

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

 

Three Flavoured Breads and a few Fruit SconesDSCF1880

I realised that the weekend's baking only produced enough bread to see us through the first week of our Easter holiday.   It is possible I could do some baking next week, up in the North West of Scotland, but I do not want to be beholden to that.

Additionally, I remembered there were a few nice ingredients lurking in the cupboard, which were ready for using up.   Here's a flavour of what I made today:

 

•1.    Tahini Bread

This is one made by SteveB: http://www.breadcetera.com/?p=423 which Eric blogged on not too long back, here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19548/taste-tahini   See Steve's post for the recipe and formula.   I made one or two alterations, but stayed sufficiently close to the recommended recipe and instructions.

Instead of using King Arthur All Purpose flour, I used Carrs Special CC flour, but included 5% Coarse Semolina to give more bite to the loaf.   I also increased the pre-fermented flour from 16 to 20%.   The bulk proof time was shorter, at 2 hours, but it was hot and sunny here again today, and I put the dough out in the sunshine, covered.   The dough mixed up strong, as seen in the photograph.DSCF1870DSCF1886

I was a little disappointed with the shaping of the final dough, and the result in the finished bread.   I guess fendu shapes work best with oval brotform, and I only have a round one.   Anyway, the split made in the dough piece with the dowel pin ended up completely lost.   The finished dough texture was really pleasing.   As regards taste, I found the bread to be very much as described in Steve's post.   Thank you to both Steve and Eric for posting on this in the first place.

DSCF1881DSCF1890DSCF1890

 

•2.    Cheese Bread

This is loosely based on Jeffrey Hamelman's formula in "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes", pp. 180 - 181.   I have made this previously and you can see the blogpost on it here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18164/whitsuntide-baking-and-other-antics    I did make quite a few changes along the way, but kept to the methods and most of the material proportions, ending up with just over 1.5kg of dough.   I increased the pre-fermented flour to just short of 30%.   I used light rye flour at nearly 11% of the total flour, where Hamelman uses just white flour.   I did use a small amount of dried yeast, as his formula directs, and this was very helpful in achieving the full volume in the Pullman Pan.   I used Paprika @ 1.2% on flour, which was very effective in terms of dough colouration.   I used a small amount of Strong Cheddar Cheese, plus Spanish Manchego Cheese, in the proportion and form Hamelman suggests.   I made a small boule, and a large loaf in a Pullman Pan, using 4 piecing.   A video is attached here to give more information on how this technique works.   See here:

There are also some photographs below showing the finished loaves.   Notice the high volume achieved in the bread, and the lovely moist crumb.   This is far too open for the type of Sandwich bread sold in UK supermarkets.   However, it is exactly what I had set out to achieve using a lengthy fermentation procedure, including a stiff levain, and just a tiny amount of dried yeast in the final dough.

DSCF1883DSCF1884DSCF1885DSCF1901DSCF1902

 

•3.    Toasted Almond, Fig and Prune Bread

Again, this uses Hamelman's idea on pp. 185 - 186, and I have made it before; see the same post referenced above.   But I used almonds instead of hazelnuts, and, added some figs as well as the prunes.   The proportion of fruit and nut is accurate to the formula, but the amount of each ingredient does not fall into line with the Hamelman recipe.   I had no wholewheat flour in stock.   Instead, I used all white bread flour, but included wheaten bran as 2.25% of the flour content.   I made just one loaf from this dough, at a whopping 1.58kg.   I have attached a video of how I incorporate fruit and nuts into ready-mixed dough:

/p>

Some photographs of this very dramatic bread are also attached below.   The flavours in this are just amazing.

DSCF1872DSCF1873DSCF1894DSCF1895DSCF1899

DSCF1908DSCF1909DSCF1910DSCF1911

 

•4.    Fruit Scones

I made a really small batch of scones as an afternoon treat to have with a pot of Green Tea.   This is based on the formula I tweaked recently when mentoring Kieran in the Scone entry for the NECTA Competition.   We had a lovely fruit and nut mix in the house, including pistachios, pecans, almonds, brazils and cashews, as well as raisins, golden raisins, cranberries and sultanas.   I added some chopped stem ginger as extra good measure.   Ordinarily I mix scones using 60% soft flour, and 40% strong flour.   As I only had strong flour in the house, I used a small proportion of light rye flour to reduce the gluten content.   I also used the baking powder kindly supplied by my colleague Dinnie Jordan, who owns Kudos Blends, and is a specialist on chemical aerators.   These scones are soooo light: many thanks Dinnie!

Formula and method below; this yields 7 scones:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Marriage's Organic Strong White Flour

90

180

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

10

20

Skimmed Milk Powder

7

14

Pell Baking Powder [specialist blend]

6

12

Organic Lightly Salted Butter

25

50

Golden Granulated Caster Sugar

18.75

37.5

Egg

6.25

12.5

Water

48

96

Fruit and Nut Mix with Stem Ginger

25

50

TOTAL

236

472

 

Method:

  • Crumb the butter with the flour, milk powder and baking powder
  • Dissolve the sugar in the water and add the egg. Then add the fruit and nuts
  • Add this to the crumb and combine until just clear.
  • Roll out on a lightly floured surface and cut out the scone shapes.
  • Place the scones on a baking sheet, and brush the tops with beaten egg
  • Rest for 15 minutes to allow the gluten to relax, and to ensure the chemical reactions take place largely in the oven
  • Bake in a pre-heated oven [200°C in my fan oven], for 15 - 17 minutes
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1877

    Best wishes to you all
    Andy
ananda's picture
ananda

 


Pain au Levain with Light Rye FlourDSCF1856


A wonderfully simple and balanced formula.   Yields one loaf scaled @ 680g and one scaled @ 1360g


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Leaven Elaboration One

 

 

Leaven from stock

 

80

Special CC Flour

 

100

Water

 

60

TOTAL

 

240

 

 

 

2. Leaven Elaboration Two

 

 

Elaboration One

 

240

Special CC Flour

 

300

Water

 

180

TOTAL

 

720

 

53.3 [640g retained]

60g returned to stock

3. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven [from above]

53.3 [33.3 flour, 20 water]

640

Special CC Flour

50

600

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

16.7

200

Salt

1.8

21.6

Water

50

600

TOTAL

171.8

2061.6

% pre-fermented flour

33.3

 

% hydration

70

 

 

Method:

  • I built the leaven over 2 elaborations, allowing 12 hour proof time between refreshments, and prior to final dough mixing.
  • For the final dough, I broke the ripened leaven into pieces and deposited in the water. Then I added the flour in a large bowl and used a plastic scraper to combine sufficiently for a period of 40 minutes autolyse
  • I added the salt and worked up the dough for 10 minutes, then set to rest for 20 minutes. Then I worked up the dough a further 10 minutes.
  • I bulk proved the dough outside in the warmth and maintained a steady dough temperature of 26°C, covered for 2 hours. I used one S&F half way through bulk proof.
  • After 1 further S&F, then a 10 minute rest, I scaled and divided the dough as above. I moulded both pieces round, and set to final proof upside down in bannetons
  • Here's the rub: the small loaf had around 3 hours final proof, and I experienced "blow-out" from the bottom of the loaf; again! The larger loaf, I therefore gave 5 hours proof and it came out perfectly. I did use quite a bit of steam baking this loaf to try and avoid any further unsightliness.
  • After baking fully, I turned the oven off, and left the loaf inside the cooling oven with the door wedged ajar for 10 minutes. Then I set the loaves to cool on wires

 

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Thoughts:

  • The longer proof time on the large boule is just right. I have utter confidence in the leavens I maintain, feed and elaborate; also in the quality of final dough produced. I've increased the proportion of pre-fermented flour in the formula, generally, now being around 33%. Also, I'm using longer proof times. Even though the weather is getting warmer, this is the proving conditions demanded by the dough, so I have responded.
  • The taste of this bread is superb. I tried a small piece about an hour ago, and the deep flavours from crust and crumb linger so subtly. It's not overtly sour, or, salty, yet still packs a great and complex flavour.
  • Alison was busy with our plant pot garden, and I helped out tidying the patio as the sun shone, and the dough underwent its magical transformations.
  • We have new daisies to brighten the patio, and I have wood chopped and prepared to fire up the oven later this week.
  • DSCF1853DSCF1855
  • We want to go to Sicily in October.
  • We are going to the far North of Scotland on Saturday for a week's holiday. Lochinver here we come!......And it looks a little bit like this!

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Very best wishes to you all

Andy

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