The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Community Bake - 123 SD (Tenth Anniversary)

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Community Bake - 123 SD (Tenth Anniversary)

It’s been ten years this October since Flo posted her (now famous) 123 SD Bread. For those not familiar with our Community Bakes see THIS LINK.  Reference links are posted below below. The idea of a Community Bake is for those interested in baking and learning, to bake with us and post the results. I idea is that we all learn together. This is not a bread baking competition, everyone wins!

 

For those that don’t use a sourdough starter, there is a yeasted version on the very bottom of this post. If you need help with anything, reply requesting help.

 

Those that have baked this bread before might want to add vairious ingredients. New bakers to this bread can use the links below to get the basic loaf dialed in. The beauty of the 123 SD is the formula (recipe) requires no math. As Flo said, “it’s as easy as 1.2.3...”

 

Flo wrote me and asked that I post her correspondence for the gang to read.

 

- - - - - - Flo’s Correspondence - - - - - - 

 

Yes Oct. 2018 is the 10th anniversary of the 123 and I'm so delighted it is such a popular formula !

 

 

I don't bake bread anymore these days because I have been quite sick and one of the culprits that has been identified is wheat... I already knew since 2010 that rye makes me terribly sick, but baking without wheat is much more complicated.I have  been tempted to adapt 1.2.3 to GLuten Free flours but my results have not been great.I really have had to grieve over my inability to bake bread anymore, it was such a joy and pleasure for me...I will certainly, though, one day, put my hands -and my heart- back into some (gluten free) flours to bake bread once again !

 

Thank you SO much for posting the bake, it thrills me as much as it honors me !

 

Happy baking, and please feel free to post this email from me to all the SD bakers, with a big warm hello from me.

 

Flo

 

- - - - - - Second Correspondence - - - - - -

 

My 123 SD is my husband's fault ;-)

 

I had been baking with sourdough for many years, absolutely loving it, and so did my family. I had read many books about it, and kept experimenting with new recipes. One day, as I was saying that I had too much sourdough starter for the recipe I wanted to bake, my husband said "why don't you come up with a formula to easily bake with the precise weight of ripe starter you have on hand ? I'm sure it would be helpful". I answered something like "you mean as easy as 1.2.3 ?", while thinking "hey, why not try that ?" So I weighed my starter, added double that weight of water, and then triple that weight of flour. I mixed and let the dough rest 20 minutes. I added almost 2% of the flour's weight of salt, mixed again, let it rest, folding the dough once in a while etc. We loved the result and I began to play with the formula. A publisher even wanted to edit a book on it ! With a friend, we toyed with the idea, came up with numerous variations (which have never been rendered public), but life happened and we never did it. 2 years later, I began suspecting that one of my daughters and myself were not tolerating well gluten filled flours. I tried to adapt the 1.2.3 to gluten free bread baking. It did work but my sourdough starter was then too bitter. Nowadays, I rarely bake bread. But it fills me with joy (and maybe a hint of pride ;-) ) to hear about the 123 formula being still liked and useful !

 

Best regards

Flo

 

- - - - - - End Fol’s Correspondence - - - - - - 

 

Resources

 

123 Sourdough - No Knead - Do Nothing For those baking the 123 for the first time - check this out.

 

123 Challenge Great ideas for those considering spicing things up.

 

Everyone is welcomed to join. Beginners and experts, all learning together.

 

For those that don’t use a starter, you can you this recipe that has been converted to yeast. Using a pre-ferment will boost the flavor tremendously.

 

- - - - - - Yeasted version of the 123 bread - - - - - -

 

Here is a LINK  with information concerning preferments.

 

 Formula:

350g flour

250g water

7g salt

Poolish:

 

50g flour

50g water

0.2g dried (0.17g to be exact but 0.2g is fine) or 0.5 fresh yeast. NOTE - a pinch of dry yeast is 0.22 which is plenty close enough.

Left overnight and to be used the next day when active like in the photo on My Weekend Bakery. 

 

Final Recipe:

 

100g poolish

200g water

300g flour

7g salt

An optional pinch of extra yeast otherwise expect it to be slower

Something along these lines. But with such small amounts of yeast you can just use a small pinch in the poolish and use when ready. You'll get an overnight cool ferment out of it. Some extra yeast in the final dough is often added but not strictly necessary. 

 

- - - - - - End yeasted version of the 123 bread - - - - - - 

 

Dan

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

for posting this. Looking forward to the bake, I'm sure the turnout will be massive and that information, tips and recipes -- and photos -- will be exchanged, all in good fun. What a wonderful learning experience this will be.

Enjoy!

Carole

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

NO MATH! Really? What the heck is this then? 😉 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

You must have been an engineer is another life <LOL> Einstein equations weren’t that complex :-)

Danny

syros's picture
syros

Thanks for kicking this off! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

call it Chicken Scratch:-)  Bread without math is like a day without ....eeeerrrr.......bread!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

call it Chicken Scratch:-)  Bread without math is like a day without ....eeeerrrr.......bread!  i'm not baking bread right now due to a no carb diet but my daughter asked for one yesterday for her Thursday Bruschetta party next week.  Daughter to the rescue of the 123 Community Bake!

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Jeez Danni, you lost me after "Einkorn"! 😄

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

At times, I got lost myself in that mess! 

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

I am very intrigued about the Einkorn! 

littlelisa's picture
littlelisa

Danni... that page looks exactly like what can be found in my kitchen on a bake day!! Classic. 

syros's picture
syros

Yep, kind of looks like what I do except that you actually know what you’re doing and I’m on a wing and a prayer! Can’t wait for the bake to begin!

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I've been baking since we got here to Canberra, and most of them have been 123 sourdoughs. The challenge for me is making sure my starter travelled well, using 'foreign' flour, and baking in a strange kitchen with limited equipment. 

The first loaf was made with a single build of the starter. Liquid was water and the flour was 75 grams of whole grain and 225 grams of a nice strong bakers flour from the local market. I mixed it all at once in a bowl with the salt (no autolyse), then slapped it around on the bench for a bit. It was very strong and developed quickly. Just needed a couple of stretch and folds over an hour or so.

The house is quite cold and the starter was not as active as I would have liked. Bulk ferment was very slow and I ended up leaving it out at cool room temperature all night, probably about 14 hours or more in all. It was nice the next morning so I shaped and baked it. We searched the kitchen for something to bake it in, and I was thrilled to find they have a an enameled roaster - perfect!

This loaf had a wonderful mellow sour flavor and moist crumb.

The next day I made another one, but did the starter in two builds. It was much nicer that way. Same blend of flours. The crumb was moist but a bit more even.

The next day I made a simple ale poolish bread. Not a 123, but I took a couple of pictures of the set up with my sneaky proofing basket and roasting pan.

Yesterday I got a bit more adventurous. Same basic formula, then I folded in some grated Gran Padano cheese, chopped black olives and fresh rosemary from the garden. I shaped this one into a boule and proofed it in a basket lined with a floured cloth. 

 

I haven't cut it yet. We drove down to the coast for a couple of days and I brought it with me, so I'll report back later. Meanwhile I want to get this posted as I've had to type the whole thing on my phone and figure out how to post photos - another challenge!

Wendy

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

with this challenge! Each loaf is more gorgeous than the previous one! I am totally impressed that you are producing that kind of quality with unfamiliar flour and in a strange kitchen to boot. Amazing really!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

Your are not a 'lazy loafer' but very busy and talented loafer which is needless to say as one bake after another gets better and better and you are not even in your own kitchen and different flours....Lovely, happy and wholesome bread! Makes the soul sing! :D Kat

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

different flours, different oven... and it all works beautifully!  the cheese, olive and rosemary sounds wonderful.

enjoy your trip

Leslie

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I cut the bread this morning - another challenge with the knife they have here in the little b & b where we're staying for a couple of days. I was surprised at the fairly close even texture of the crumb, though pleased with the nice moistness of it. It's not dense and very tasty. I think this strong baker's flour I bought needs a bit more water than the 123 formula. Next bake ...

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

Who is the miller and what does the label say? I have not heard a lot of compliments for Aussie flour, but I have seen some nice loaves from down under so I don't know what to tell folks to look for.

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

It was from a little market shop in Hawker in Canberra. I'm not there so can't check right now, but I don't think it had a brand name. Just "Baker's Flour" or something like that. The girl in the shop said it was strong flour.

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

We have visitors this weekend so I had to crack on with this experiment and here we go....first go at baking with oats porridge.....

100g leaven,  100 Hydration 

200g ish water

150g WW

150g Strong white bread

150g porridge, 1:3 ratio 

Shifted bran out of WW flour and soaked with boiled water for 5 hours whilst waiting for leaven (used 75g of my water from the 200g for this)

AL was approx 5 hours and as I only used the remaining 125g water for mix, the dough felt very stiff dough with the WW...

I mixed the porridge in with the 2nd Stretch and fold and as was fairly stiff I just added water as needed just to be able to do Rubaud and therefore probably a higher hydration loaf at the 200g and not sure about hydration...felt like a much stiffer dough than normally...

I expected this to be a quick moving one with the WW in it and proofed at room temp for 1 1/2....

It is not widly open crumb but tastes amazing and just made school sandwiches for my son and will be interesting whether he spots the difference with the oats...he does not like porridge! The crumb has an amazing moist texture without feeling gummy and I wanted to test as so many people say that it stays fresher for longer! I will bake this again and can't wait for all the other bakes! Thank you Dan for organizing...  Kat

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

That's beautiful, Kat! I love oat porridge bread - so moist and tender. I think that crumb is just perfect. 🙂

Wendy

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

love the oats on the outside!  Porridge breads don’t usually taste, well porridgy,  so hopeful your son was happy with his sandwich. the crumb is perfect for sandwiches.

I am starting my bake today, fingers crossed as to how it will go.  it is a great idea to do this anniversary bake!

Bake happy

Leslie

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

The Oats on the top just add the right touch! Beautiful!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Here is the write up that I posted on my TFL blog. Lots of pictures there too. It is too much of a pain to add all the pictures to this post as well. 

 

This weekend is Canadian Thanksgiving, and as usual, I have been asked to bring bread to the family dinner. Because it is going to be served with a number of different courses, I needed a rather plain sort of bread. At the same time, the 1-2-3 challenge presented itself. So how to combine the two… well, it is the harvest, might as well use the plethora of grains that are in my pantry as well as some flour from the local miller. He produces 100% wholegrain flour and a partially sifted flour. I bought both at the Farmer’s Market and made sure to include some in my recipe (the levain was made with this). The remaining grains were simply milled into flour and the bran sifted out to also feed the levain.

 

I must note that I initially thought “Yay, no math!”. But then reality kicked in. I needed to make loaves of a certain weight because I was selling some, I had to make 4 batches, each batch needed to make 3 loaves, I had to figure out the total amount of flour and how to split that between the levain and the main dough to respect the 1-2-3 challenge, the levain had to be multiplied by 4 with a bit extra so I would have enough, then that amount had to be split up to make a 3 stage levain, I had to decide which flour and how much would be used to put into the levain with the sifted bran, and so on and on and on. Just be happy that the math is all done for you in the recipe below. 

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

Ingredients:

70 g Einkorn berries

70 g Spelt berries

70 g Kamut berries

70 g Rye berries

70 g Red Fife berries

70 g Selkirk berries

70 g Buckwheat groats

77 g Brulé Creek whole wheat flour 

76 g Brulé Creek partially sifted flour

630 g unbleached flour

720 g water

360 g 3 stage 100% hydration levain (process below)

25 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g local yogurt

 

The morning before:

  1. In the morning, mill all the grains and sift out the bran. I ended up with 459 g of sifted flour and 29 g of bran. Reserve the bran for the levain. 
  2. Place the sifted flour in a tub. To the tub, add the unbleached flour. Stir, cover and reserve for the next day.
  3. Take 26 g of starter from your fridge and feed it 26 g of water and 26 g of the bran. 

The evening before:

  1. About 12 hours later, feed the levain 52 g water and 52 g bran/wholewheat flour. Let rise overnight. 

Dough making day:

  1. Do the final feeding of the levain. Add to the levain 104 g each of water and wholewheat/partially sifted flour. This should use up all of the Brûlé Creek flour. Let rise till double. This took about 6.5 hours but mine sat for another couple of hours while the main dough autolysed (life got in the way). Amazingly enough, it hadn’t started receding when I finally got back to it.
  2. A couple of hours before the levain is ready (or in my case, when the levain was ready but I made it wait), add the water to the tub of flour and autolyse for 2 hours. I must note that I had to work a bit harder to get all of the flour hydrated. I do prefer to work with a slightly more hydrated dough but in the spirit of sticking to the 1-2-3 recipe, I didn’t add any water although I was sorely tempted to do so. I added the salt on top of the dough and left it there during the autolyse. 
  3. After the autolyse, add the yogurt and the levain. Mix well and let rest 10 minutes. Do in tub folds until the dough pulls away cleanly from the sides of the tub. Let rest 30 minutes.
  4. Do three sets of French slaps and folds (75/40/10) at 30 minutes intervals. Again on 30 minute intervals, do 2 sets of stretches and folds in the tub. Let rest until you can see bubbles through the walls of the tub, the dough feels a bit jiggly and there are some bubbles along the walls of the tub. The dough should have risen about 20%. I must say that this dough was a lot firmer than what I am used to and the gluten seemed to develop much faster. Total bulk fermentation at 72F was 3.5 hours. 
  5. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~730 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 45 minutes to one hour on the counter. 
  6. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  7. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 8 hours. 

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

 

Once again, the shorter bulk and proof are giving me loaves that I am quite happy with!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

I love the look of those loaves and I must try to use the bran for the levain.... Can't wait to see the crumb...and with all those flours what the taste must be like.....!!! Kat

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

love the mix of grains, you always manage to come up with such great ideas.. love it. look forward to the crumb

happy Canadian thanksgiving Danni

Leslie

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Did you manage to keep one for yourself? I always wonder of any of the flavour comes through when using so many different flours. Perhaps my tastebuds simply aren't discriminating enough. 🙂 Happy Thanksgiving!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

to a family dinner so I will get to see and taste the crumb there. As to flavour, I don’t expect that anything should really stands out except freshness. FResh milled flour really makes a difference. 

FloArnaud's picture
FloArnaud

You sure are taking my 123 formula to the next level !

Bravo and thank you !

Flo

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

“Life (and bread) is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get”.

I really thought I messed this one up. I was fully prepared to post an absolute flop. The addins were 20% Sharp Cheddar, 20% jalapeño, and 20% crispy bacon. The addins were added after the dough was mixed and rested. The dough was spread like a pizza dough and the ingredients were added onto the single layer. (I wonder how it would have turned out if it was baked as a pizza.) The dough was then folded back up and continued to BF. I thought that I went over board on the addins (probably did), but I baked the fragile thing anyway. Scoring was done with a very light touch. Low and behold it baked up very nicely. “Bread is like a box of chocolates...” Sometimes the surprise is a good one. The flavor is pretty darn good.

Next bake is in the works. Multi-seed, milk, and a tangzhong.

So far, everyone’s bread has turned out phenomenal! There is a lot of ingenuity taking place for this bake. 

Dan

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Any non-gluten bakers around? Wouldn’t it be nice if someone would come up with a non-gluten 123 formula? It would be a great gift of appreciation for Flo. 

Can you image being an avid bread baker, only to find out one day you can no longer tolerate gluten :-(

Danny

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I would if I was home with all my gf flours! It will have to wait...

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Wendy, I know Flo would be thrilled to be able to bake bread again. I have no experience with non-gluten anything.

Danny

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

it looks like a lot of add ins but the final crumb is great - can just imagine how good it tastes!  

Leslie

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

What a great combo of ingredients! I am totally impressed at the oven spring and the crumb with all those add-ins! Must be delicious!

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

That's an amazing amount of stuff in that bread. It must smell and taste soooooo good! Bacon is good... 😁

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I have no experience formulating addins, but the bread came out great. Each slice is jammed with flavor from all 3 of the ingredients. Next time I may put some of the jalapeños seeds for some heat.

Is there a trick for incorporating things like this and into the dough? What do you think about adding grated cheese and peppers in the flour before the water is added? Should I use very high gluten flour to hold the ingredients better?

Danny

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is perfect for getting add ins incorporated.

Southbay's picture
Southbay

you will be imitated for the bread you showed here. Amen Danny boy, the bacon, the peppers are calling

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Southbay, let us know the results, if you bake the jalapeño, bacon, & cheese version. I am interested to learn better ways to incorporate the add-ins.

I think the oils from the bacon and cheese will prevent an extremely light crumb, but with a bread that taste like this, who cares?

The flavor is as good as you imagine it to be. Next time I may leave in some seeds.

Dan

syros's picture
syros

Holy Moly! I think I might be terrified to do my bake in a couple of days! You guys are simply amazing! I’m speechless at all the bakes. Danni, you always come up with incredible bakes. I don’t know where you get your energy from. Everyone - the breads look delicious! Wendy, how do you manage to bake when you’re not even home? 

Dan, as you know I’m no expert, but I think both Maurizio and Trevor do their add in’s when they do their 2nd S & F’s, but with this recipe, I have no idea. But I love your bread! Looks so yummy. Can’t wait to bake!

 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I nearly panicked today when I saw how inventive folks are.  My effort is underway and is proving to be a challenge with my choice of flours.  Like Danni I wanted to up the hydration but have restrained myself, but very concerned how it will turn out. 

When do you plan to bake Sharon?

Leslie

syros's picture
syros

Don't think I can do anything before Monday with a weekend busy with pizza! I liked that you used kamut - which I have been toying with. I'm still in the not sure which flours I plan on using yet. 

syros's picture
syros

Happy Thanksgiving everyone. Enjoy the bakes and the food! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and friends - happy 123 balking too!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

of what's being shown on these posts! Making me feel a bit intimidated by all this beauty, creativity and general yumminess.

Autolysing now, after a very stupid near mishap (never mix dough right out of bed and before coffee, no matter how ready your leaven looks!)

Hope to be back tomorrow with a bake.

In the meantime, congratulations to Kat, Leslie, Danni and Danny -- you all rock! 

 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

And thank you, Dan, for organising yet another fun event.

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

this version ‘s flour mix is 15% kamut, 10% wholegrain spelt, 75% breadflour.

Milled kamut and spelt yesterday afternoon. Kamut is the only grain that jams my Mockmill! 1 tiny part of a grain jammed it.  After milling the spelt and kamut I sifted out the bran and used this as part of the final levain build last night. A bit cool overnight so left it at room temperature today and by lunchtime it was ready.  

Autolysed  kamut and some of the water for half an hour then added spelt and rest of the water. It was pretty dry so I actually added a further 10 g water and left for another 30 minutes. 

Added the levain and hand kneaded a bit then struggled to get 50 kind of SLAFs done. Rested 10 minutes then added salt and incorporated with a further 10 SLAFs (couldn’t do any more) and a few stretch and folds.  2 more sets of stretch and folds 30 minutes apart and a final one 45 minutes later.  the dough was strong (i think) and did not relax much. left it for another 2 hours on the bench at 22°c then put it in the microwave with the door cracked open at about 26°c for another hour. It was nice and puffy and probably about increased by about 80%. pre shaped, rested 30 minutes then bench proofed for 2 hours. Baked 230°c for 15 minutes in DO lid on, 15 minutes lid off.

I didn’t retard overnight as I was also baking Abe’s Swiss Farmhouse loaf and needed to bake tonight so 1:2:3 was baked as well. I think the crumb will not be very open, but we will see tomorrow.

 Leslie

syros's picture
syros

Nice looking loaf Leslie! 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

it is soft, moist and really nice.  no strong flavours either. a great sandwich bread.  I was worried it might be quite dense as my only other kamut loaf was. 

Abe's picture
Abe

Kamut is a wonderful grain. Produces a cake like crumb and is sweet. Doesn't handle like bread flour but can be appreciated for what it is. That loaf is going to toast up nicely. How did the Swiss Farmhouse bread go? I do love that recipe. 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

We too love it. I won’t post it here though but I think it is my best one yet.

Leslie

Abe's picture
Abe

It's delicious. I'm so glad you're enjoying it as much as I do. 

P.s. I think kamut would work so well in that recipe. It's practically made for it.

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I stopped milling Kamut a while back. I mill by hand and it was like grinding gravel into sand. However, I found if I sprout it then dry it, it's much easier to mill. Or I'll sprout it and grind it wet into pulp in the food processor.

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I haven’t sprouted anything in a while so I will try to remember this tip for my next kamut bake.

thanks Wendy

Leslie

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Leslie, it is a good idea to put your hard grains into the hopper after the motor is turned on. Also, have you thought about grinding coarser initially and the regrinding?

Dan

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

The first grind went well but there must have been one large bit of grain loitering ‘cause when I remilled finer it jammed pretty quickly.  it was fine after but it is something I have to be aware of with Kamut.

Leslie

Abe's picture
Abe

They all look so good! This community bake has gotten off to a marvellous start. Agreed! The bar has been set very high. I was going to do my 1:2:3 bake tomorrow but decided last minute to begin, at least, today. I've put together a levain and hopefully it'll be ready by early evening to get started on the dough. 

FloArnaud's picture
FloArnaud

I'm honored and impressed, you are all so passionate and your breads are so beautiful : BRAVO & MERCI, it's a joy to realize my little 10 yo formula is in so many kitchens all over the world !

I don't spend much time on the internet anymore so please don't take it personally if I don't react to your posts and comments quickly. 

Bread-lover-ly yours

Flo

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

 

For this bake I went Poppy, Millet, Sunflower seeds, a little ground coffee beans, and topped it of with a potato flake Tangzhong. It turned out well and tasted good. Boy, that 123 is versatile!

The coffee beans seem to work like Chocolate Malt in that a tiny bit really darkens the crust and crumb.

Dan

syros's picture
syros

Wow wow wow!!! You all are doing Flo proud. 

Dan I have a question - spreadsheets are not my thing. How much levain did you use? Math is really not my strong suit - so could you break it down for me? Like 1-2-3 ha ha!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Sharon, take a look at the two columns, Preferment 1 and Preferment 2. For the weight dough I used 50g water and 50g flour. In my case I show 10g starter, but you could just as easily use 50g starter so it will mature sooner.

If you choose to use a Tangzhong it is detailed in the column to the right. But the Tangzhong is not mandatory.

Or simply 100g levain, 200g water, 300g flour, 7g salt, 24 (each) of 3 seeds of your choice. Throw in 3 g of coffee if you wish. And skip the Tangzhong.

NOTE: I choose seeds that I thought would not soak up too much water. I toasted the seeds, then added them to the dry flour and mixed as normal.

Dan

syros's picture
syros

Thank you Dan. I’ve had a bag of poppy seed that I have wanted to use, so now might be a good time!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Another amazing loaf. Look at that rise! Did you add vitamin  c? 

Thanks for the tip about the coffee beans. That color is too much!

Are you feeding the neighborhood with all these bakes?

 

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

No I left the ascorbic acid out. I only really use AA when doing exceptionally long, warm ferments.

The neighbors are happy :-)

Dan

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

It is amazing how this loaf -- and the other one even more so -- managed to rise despite the weight of all your yummy add-ins.

Excellent baking.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Carole, I think the relatively large percentage of prefermented flour make for a strong and active dough.

Danny

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Have turned out some amazing loaves. I want a chinxk of the cheddar- jalapeño 😀

Thanks for organising this bake!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

you got ears!

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

that is gorgeous! wonderful crumb! and yes 123 is an amazingly adaptible formula. that is why so many of us love it.

Leslie

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

I can't keep up with all the amazing ideas........WOW Dan with the fillings and how much can you get in one loaf...... and the Many Seeded and Coffee with it's lacy crumb reminds me of the early Champlain bakes...lacy and beautiful...

Leslie...beautiful crumb and love the look of the oats...I must get my hands again on some Kamut....

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I thought - oh, I have baked a twin for Kat’s loaf, lol. 

Dan’s two blow me away they are just sooo good!

thanks Kat, happy baking

Leslie

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

great minds think alike .....I might do another bake once I have a bit more time without visitors...I have my mind on Semolina/Durum....

So many options.....Kat

syros's picture
syros

Leslie, I have only used Breadtopia’s kamut sourdough recipe - 20% and that bread bulk ferments for almost 10 hours at room temp, then shaped, and an overnight retard otherwise bake about 2 hours after shaping and proofing on the counter. So I have been really afraid to use kamut in any other recipe because I’ve never been certain about the BF and proof times with it. So now you have piqued my interest!

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

and hydration I think mid 60s, it was dense and didn’t rise much. I guess I wasn’t patient enough.  This time with only 15% the colour is not so obvious, but maybe the spelt gave it a bit more extensibility.  I would have loved to up the hydration as it was pretty strong.  It took a while to actually get going too. 

I think kamut probably likes it a bit warmer too.  Kamut is very expensive here so I can only do an occasional bake with it.  so glad it has turned out well for this bake. 

Do have a go, but be patient and make sure it has proofed enough. My bulk was proofed to a greater extent than I am now doing with other bread, but only because of last time.

Leslie

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I could have addressed individual 'Wows' to each of you, but it seemed a bit silly. You ladies impress the daylights out of me. I love the oat-coated ones -- they look like what mine are supposed to be!

You are all an inspiration and I'm glad I found this site.

I hope to be joining you tomorrow.

Enjoy!

Carole 

Portus's picture
Portus

 

I tried to stick to the original recipe Flo posted way back when, and my only points of intentional departure were that I baked on my cast iron baking stone with steam rather than in a DO and I added a scant pinch of diastatic malt powder as a snack for the overnight proof. The end result rendered a crispy crust and a decent crumb that is quite light in texture.  This formula delivers a delightful “loaf for all seasons” that never fails to please!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

The 123 bake has produced a bunch of really nice loaves. Yours is beautiful.

I am wondering if we’ll get to see a flop. I thought I had one with the jalapeño, but it pulled through. No one wants a bad loaf, but it is a great learning opportunity.

Imagine how pleased Flo must be... And it all starter when her hubby egged her on to bake a loaf as “easy as 123”. 

Dan

Portus's picture
Portus

... Dan! I have a tester in the fridge at present that I aim to bake later today and will post the results.  However, I am either too risk averse or not that creative to go out on a limb with the sort of loaves you and others have tabled during this community bake;-)

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

it is always good to do bake as the original. love the crumb and you got great oven spring. 

Leslie

Portus's picture
Portus

... the oven spring perhaps comes from a very active starter, a very hot cast iron baking stone/steel (260C), lots of steam in the first 12-15 minutes and an immediate turning down of the temperature once the loaf is loaded? Joe

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is so popular.  Easy to remember, makes great tasting bread and disappears fast so yo can make another one.  Yours looks grand,

happy baking 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Having made Shiao Ping's spin on Chad Robertson's chocolate sourdough for the Solstice Challenge, I'd also bookmarked Beatrice's very interesting chocolate sourdough recipe. This 1:2:3 bake seemed like the perfect opportunity to play around a little bit, so I dreamed this one up:

Choco-orange 1:2:3

Yield: ±1100g

Chocolate starter:

  • 5g 100% starter
  • 15g T65 flour
  • 5g cocoa powder
  • 20g warm water
  • 2g sugar
  • Mix all and ferment about 7 hours

Chocolate levain:

  • 40g chocolate starter
  • 70g T65 flour
  • 70g water
  • Mix all, rest overnight

Final dough:

  • 180g chocolate levain
  • 486g T65 flour
  • 54g cocoa powder
  • 360g liquid
  • 10g salt
  • 125g add-ins

Late morning on Bake Day –2, I made the chocolate starter, a first for me. At the end of 7 hours, it didn't look like it had done much; at 8 hours, there were lots of little bubbles and the thing had grown a bit. So proceeded to building the levain.

The levain almost doubled in about 3 hours, so I stuck it in the fridge till the next morning.

On the morning of Bake Day –1, took the levain out of the fridge (it had about quadrupled), autolysed flour, cocoa powder and liquid, which in this case consisted of water, some dead AYW and about 10g of orange-blossom water.

After an autolyse of about an hour, added the levain and mixed. Rested 20 minutes, mixed in salt.

Proceeded to a bunch of SLAFs, which in all lasted 20-30 minutes, with a rest period after the first 150 slaps.

After the dough had relaxed a bit, spread the dough out as thin as possible and layered on chopped hazelnuts (60g) and chopped candied orange peel (80g).

Left to rest for about 1.5 hours, at which point I put the dough in the fridge, since we needed to go out for the afternoon.

7.5 to 8 hours later, took the dough out of the fridge and let it warm up a little, for about an hour, maybe less.

Divided, preshaped tightly, bench-rested 30 minutes, final shape into baskets lined with almond meal, bench-rested for about 40 minutes (thanks, Leslie), put them into a plastic bag to spend the night in the fridge.

Bake Day: while oven was heating, removed loaves from fridge, spritzed with water, sprinkled with ground hazelnuts, spritzed, slashed and spritzed again.

Baked covered for 30 minutes at 210°C (I was afraid to go too hot, because of the sugary bits and the hazelnut coating), lowered temp to 200° for the last 10 minutes, uncovered. Final dough temp: 99°C.

I'm not sure if these could've risen higher, and am very curious to see what the crumb will be like in the morning.

En tout cas, merci beaucoup, Flo, d'avoir inspiré tant d'idées!

Happy baking!

Carole

Here's the crumb


My usual too-closed crumb, I'm afraid. I'm wondering if I should have let it warm up longer and see if there was further growth after the 5-hour bulk retard.

Like Joe's loaf, you can see the rolled-beach-towel effect in the distribution of the goodies.

Angus had a slice untoasted and tasted more citrus than anything else. Toasting brought out the chocolate aroma, but perhaps I could have pushed the percentage of cocoa powder in the dough even higher. What was strangely subdued was the taste of hazelnuts, almost non-existent.

I'm thinking this would make a good peanut-butter and banana sandwich, although it was great with just a scraping of butter on it.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Alright Carole, I get. You’ve been holding out on us :-)

Have you been keeping your secret weapon in an undisclosed area under wraps. You sly dog. LOL

Please be sure to describe the flavor in great detail. “Inquiring minds want to know”

Dan

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

is all of the wonderful knowledge and information so generously shared here. The results of your inquiring minds have taught me loads and loads. And, while not Canadian, I'm feeling pretty thankful about that!

Abe's picture
Abe

Chocolate Hazelnuts Orange Sourdough. What's there not to like? A lovely recipe with great results. Please let us know how it tastes.  

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Looking forward to your bake 😊

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Chocolate, oranges and hazelnuts!!! Wow! It looks amazing and it must taste fantastic! Your creativity is out of this world! 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Your flour blends and flavor pairings are always remarkable!

Thanks for the kind words. Can't wait to taste it.

Happy family dinner!

Carole

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

What a combination and this looks so delicious!!! A M A Z I N G!  Kat

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

for the kind words! I'm looking forward to your next bake to see what other ideas I can crib.

Have fun!

Carole 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Did you do further S&f after adding the nuts & peel or did you just fold/roll it all up? very intrigued to see the crumb... just wonderful ideas

Leslie

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

After adding the goodies, I did a sort of extended letter fold. The fact of pressing the stuff into the dough made it stick a little too much to the bench, and the dough was kinda soft. So I had to slip my bench knife under to move things along and wound up rolling/folding from two sides toward the center. This gave a long skinny tube, which I then sort of letter-folded onto itself. That got rested enough to relax enough for a letter fold.

Tearing the dough was a possibility, especially in the final shape. Actually, there were a couple of tears in one of the loaves before retarding, but it sort of healed over by loading time.

Thanks for all of your informative hard work and your lovely bakes.

Carole

Edit: and yes, I'm sitting on my hands (as Abe says) to not open the loaf tonight. I'm curious about the crumb and worried about the distribution of the goodies.

Abe's picture
Abe

On this loaf, especially when toasted, would be a great combo.

Got a lovely even crumb there, Carole. I also think chocolate in the dough might be quite heavy and prevent a more open crumb.

I can imagine this smells wonderful while toasting.

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

that I don't own any peanut butter? There may ba a jar of almond butter lurking in a cupboard somewhere though. 'Twon't be be same, but it"ll be close enough, I hope.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Perfect crumb for those add ins too. Has to put smiles on everyone's face.  Nice!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Been missing you!

Abe's picture
Abe

 

Levain Build: quadrupled in 4-5 hours

  • 17g whole rye starter @ 70% hydration
  • 63g mulberry yeast water
  • 60g whole spelt flour

Porridge: soaked and cooked

  • 40g cracked rye
  • 80g water

Dough:

  • 130g levain 
  • 260g water
  • 390g flour (360g bread flour + 30g toasted wholegrain barley flour)
  • 9g salt
  • 120g porridge

Method:

  • Autolyse flour and water.
  • Add the salt and levain - combine.
  • Bulk ferment till ready (about 4 hours), with 4x stretch and folds every 30 - 40 minutes - adding the porridge at the 2nd set - rest the remainder.
  • Pre-shape and bench rest for 20 minutes.
  • Shape and final proof in the fridge for 20 hours.
  • Bake.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I’m sure I could pick an “Abe Loaf” out of a line up :-) Your breads always look great!

I don’t ever remember a communiy Bake with so many nice loaves. Who knows? Maybe the bread I’m set to bake tomorrow will take the “Flop” honors. I decided to have fun and push things to (maybe over) the limits. Hint - it uses ground Cheetos! “You just never know...”

Heck, Carole jumped out of the box. I thought I’d just run with it. The dough does smell good. I find myself snacking on the raw dough. LOL

It’s going to be a real healthy snack :-)

Dan

Abe's picture
Abe

Let's hope the crumb and taste live up to this. I'm just admiring your bakes. That one with the potato tangzhong is amazing. Loving the colour and crumb. 

Now I'm peckish! 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Abe's loaves are distinctive, probably unmistakable. That perfect shape and the spotless tray 😊.

I love Cheetos! Not even sure we get those crunchy ones here in Paris. You gonna dust your loaf with them?

BTW, if anybody did any box-jumping, that would be Beatrice and Shiao Ping. If I take credit for anything, it's just taking their notes and running with it, as you say.

Looking forward to your next surprise!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Where's the Cheetos loaf? Eager to see what you've concocted. :-D

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

so wholesome and reassuring with those ingredients.

Lovely loaf as ever, eager for crumb shot and taste report. 

Abe's picture
Abe

Barley is nutty and sweet, spelt and rye compliment each other imo and while YW has no tang but lends a lovely flavour I'm hoping the 20 hours fridge time would have encouraged the sourdough to shine through too. Your description is exactly what I was trying to convey. 

P.s. that's my drip tray. It's turned white as I use it to steam the oven and the water here is hard. 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

What do you taste?

Abe's picture
Abe

Thanks Carole. A pleasant tang with a sweet(er) crust. 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Or barley or spelt?

I think you should call this your Comfort food loaf 😊 

Abe's picture
Abe

And nuttiness is the barley but it's not that strong as only used 30g. It has a nice country loaf about it and that's the rye with wholegrain spelt. 

Can't wait to try it toasted tomorrow.

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Do you get the aroma from mulberries at all?  During bulk ferment I usually get the aroma coming through from my raspberry YW but not once it is baked.  great flavours. mulberries, rye, toasted barley flour, spelt mmmmm..

Leslie

Abe's picture
Abe

I used dried mulberries in the YW. Could smell it most at the levain and dough stage. I think it makes the dough smell almost like cookie dough. That could be the sweetness coming through. Once it's baked it's more noticeable in the crumb. I've gotta tell you that reactivating with dried mulberries worked extra fast time. Mulberries make strong YW.  

How's that Swiss Farm Bread coming along? 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

How do you not overproof in the fridge when you retard for 20 hours? I am finding that I need to stay under 12 hours even if I have only ~10 % prefermented flour, never mind 14%!

Abe's picture
Abe

Very little bench time after shaping and just wrapping the banneton in a towel. Sometimes my breads proof too quickly in the fridge and other times they don't. I think it depends on how adventurous I am with the bulk ferment but I still have to pinpoint the exact regarding science. What I do is check it after 2 hours and if it's beginning to bulge already I know it has to be kept on the shorter side. If it looks like it's risen but slowed right down before optimal height then j knowing Abe some time to play with. 

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

sounds great and something for my to do list as I start to experiment with porridge loaves...

Mulberry yeast water...sounds also amazing and can't wait to see the crumb...what a combination! Super bake Abe! Kat

Abe's picture
Abe

Attaching a crumb image now. Pleasant tang crumb with a sweet crust. Nice combo. 

Must admit I haven't done porridge breads often. I like the way this one has turned out. 

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

so lacy and I know already where I can buy rye flakes to give this a go!

Abe's picture
Abe

I'm happy with the crumb. The rye does come through. It is cracked rye, not rye flakes, but I'm sure flakes will work just the same. Cracked rye is still in the grain stage just chipped. I soaked them to soften them. 

I think rye flakes will absorb more and might need more water. If you can buy whole rye grains and you have a coffee grinder then a couple of seconds in the coffee grinder will give you cracked rye. You don't want flour but a rough cut. 

Soak for a few hours then cook on a low heat stirring all the time. It'll gel up a few minutes and become a but like a tangzhong but with large pieces. The rye should have softened though. Allow to cool. It'll be difficult to spread but try and break it up and distribute evenly over the dough. The stretch and folds will do the rest. 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

How did you calculate how much porridge the dough could take? 

Thanks,

Carole

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of a 123 bread.  It has to taste great too!  Well done Abe

syros's picture
syros

Carole, that is one amazing loaf. Abe, your breads are always an inspiration and fabulous. I’m awestruck at what everyone is coming up with. When I do mine, it’s going to be boring compared to everyone else’s! I haven’t reached that level of creativity yet to take such bold steps. But carry on everyone. This is a feast for the eyes and taste - even though we can’t taste them, lol!

Sharon

Abe's picture
Abe

They are more than worthy to be shown alongside all these lovely breads. In fact your sourdoughs are right at home with the best of them. Thank you for the kind words. We all learn from each other. I couldn't be inventive without everyone else here. Looking forward to your bake. 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Good bread is never boring! We're looking forward to seeing your bake!

And thanks for the kind words. We'll see whathe the inside looks and tastes like tomorrow.

Carole

Portus's picture
Portus

My starter, Firebolt, began in late 2016 with a handful of raisins I tossed into a mix of equal parts by weight of cheap cake flour and water (a lesson from James Morton) and eventually mutated into a version of NMNF.

So for my second offering in this “123” community bake I took the latitude of bending the "SD" element by making a dough with my trusted apple yeast water, flour and salt, and folding in a handful of raisins just prior to shaping and proofing.  My thinking was that this combination might fit both an extrapolated definition of “sourdough” and the 123 formula by hydrating at 71.4%.  Crumb shot to follow.

Here's the crumb shot, the swirl of raisins showing the "beach towel" roll. Not as open as I would have preferred, and as the loaf was a bit dense when I commenced the fridge proof/retard, methinks I should have extended the room temperature proof.  Would I bake this again?  Probably not; having reviewed Leslie's Swiss Farm, why reinvent the wheel!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Love the bold bake and that ear! 

Portus's picture
Portus

... I tried many sorts of lames and their equivalents to get the dough to "listen" to my quest for an ear (Friends, Romans and countrymen ...).  I ultimately tossed the lot and settled on a safety razor blade that I attach to a fettled kitchen knife for a handle.  It was at that stage I realised technique came with practice not the tools, so what you see is an accidental outcome, pleading to be a pathway to the future!

Abe's picture
Abe

Such a rich colour. Very nice bake. 

Portus's picture
Portus

... though, if you follow rugby, I would have sacrificed the colour for a SA win over New Zealand on Saturday!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I think you're being picky; that's a great loaf inside and out.

Enjoy it!

Carole

Portus's picture
Portus

... you are most gracious.  I had a slice this morning, toasted and served with thickly spread butter; it was delicious. Joe

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Would you consider sprinkling a little cinnamon over top?

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I wonder if as you say a longer bulk would have made crumb more open.  I like the beach towell roll distibution - and taste is paramount!

thanks for the compliment about the Swiss Farmhouse loaf though.  

Leslie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

using RYW.  I'm with you and have 3 levains going - a NMNF rye, a black rice NMNF - both retarded 12 hours and a Fig YW that make up the 1 of the 123 for this bake probably on Wednesday.  Has 5 whole grains with 75% of them in the 3 levains and 25% in the first of a double autolyse first stage for whole grains and then the 2nd stage for the white flour.  Now Lucy has to get some Toadies in there because of you,

Nice!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I am really enjoying this bake. I’ve gone zany and threw care to the wind. It seems no matter what I throw into the mix, the 123 succeeds. All of my bakes have adhered to the 123 hydration, and the prescribed porportions.

This time I searched the cabinets for addins. I found a bag of Cheetos and a bottle of Olive Salad. For those that may not be familiar, Cheetos is a puffy, cheese flavored snack and Olive Salad is what we use around New Orleans for Muffulettas. Olive Salad contains pickled cauliflower, carrots, celery, sweet peppers, black olives, capers, and “other spices”. And all of it is suspended in pungent olive oil. I used 15g of this olive oil also. The Cheetos were ground using a mortar and pestle.

Even using those ingredients, another success! Merci, Flo...

The olive oil made the crumb luxuriously soft.

Flo Arnaud, you are our hero!

Dan

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Who would have thought? Cheese sticks and a mixture not marinated veggies! Looks good! How does it taste?

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

It pretty darn good! The pungent olive oil really comes through. And, like I mentioned, the oil softens the crumb in a Pleasant way.

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

That looks and sounds amazing. Bet the taste is right up there too! But the Cheetos don't crunch?

Beautiful loaf. I'm so jealous of your oven spring! The neighbors'll love that! 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

who would have thought you could use those ingredients!  lovely crumb and ovenspring!

Flo is our hero for sure!

Leslie

FloArnaud's picture
FloArnaud

Thanks Dan but you're all heroes in this feed, your bread are fantastic ! Bravo !!!

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

I only see a hint of the color of the Cheetos.  I would expect them to contribute (on a substitution basis) cornmeal, salt, and orange food coloring, and maybe a hint of nutritional yeast (cheese flavor - which is an interesting thought on its own).

The loaf looks terrific!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

The crumb is actually slightly orange, but the camera didn’t pick it up. 

I ordered some white cheddar powder (Hossier Hill) today. I didn’t want the “fashionable” orange dye look. 

According to my neighbors, they said it taste like pizza. I guess the cheese and Olive Salad came through. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

before now.  You need t stay out of the auto parts stores while this bake is going on.  This one has to taste great!  I love Cheetos ......but no carbs for a while....Well done Dan

syros's picture
syros

So I’ve started finally! 

125g AP starter @100% 

250 g water @ 85F

225 g AP; 100g White Red Fife; 50g Rye

8g sea salt

53g Sultana Raisins soaked and drained

26g toasted hazelnuts

1/2 tsp. Cinnamon

1. I mixed the levain with the water and flour and let that AL for 30 minutes. 

2. Then I added the salt, hazelnuts, raisins and cinnamon. I mixed until well blended by just folding over and over in the bowl. 

3 After 30 minutes rest, I did 4 sets of gentle S&F’s - 30 minutes apart. 

4. It is now resting for at least 3 hours but I’m keeping my eye on it. I haven’t decided if I will shape and proof it and bake it tonight or do an overnight retard after shaping. 

To be continued.... Thanks to everyone for such inspirational ideas. We should create a bread book based on this recipe and dedicate it to Flo!

FloArnaud's picture
FloArnaud

and an editor that wanted to publish it. I invented many 123 variations for it, and embarked a friend some of you certainly know (Jane from aulevain.fr) in that project. But the editor wanted something even more simple that the 123 SD formula, something that was not good SD bread, not respectful, so we broke the deal. And then I could not eat bread any more and I put the recipes in a folder...

 

cfraenkel's picture
cfraenkel

You have inspired me.  Years ago, I used to make something I called "garbage bread" where I would roll up cheese and whatever I found in the fridge that needed to be used up in dough and bake it.  I seem to remember loving bacon and broccoli with cheddar.  Don't have any broccoli at the moment, but I may have to see what else is lurking in the fridge.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Hey Carolann, let’s have some of that “garbage bread”. LOL

On a serious note, the 14% prefermented flour coupled with the 71% hydration is proving out to be a very good ratio. Some months back we setup a reference post for new sourdough bakers. It detailed a very basic and straight forward method to bake the 123 SD. This community bake has confirmed that we chose the right formula for fisrt time sourdough bakers. HERE is the LINK.  I often refer new SD baker to that link for their initial bake. It is a great place to start.

Danny

cfraenkel's picture
cfraenkel

in the fridge. I found some interesting things in the fridge.  More when I get home from work.

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

This is such fun! Every is being so creative (okay, Cheetos wins that one hands down), and even the more plain loaves are turning out beautifully. I'm mulling over what I'll bake next!

Wendy

syros's picture
syros

So after allowing the dough to proof for another 3 hours at room temp, I decided to bake it - 30 minutes at 500F, and 10 minutes @450F. 

I let it cool for about 2 hours and had to cut into it. I must say, it is moist and airy and delicious. Wish I had added more raisins. It would be interesting to see how an overnight retard would have turned out, but with my schedule tomorrow I was afraid of overproofing. 

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and must taste amazing! I can't wait for the herb bread....Oh so many inspiring loaves... Kat

syros's picture
syros

I'm having issues with my computer and pictures, so all total, bulk fermentation started at 9:15 am when I mixed the starter, flour and water, followed by the salt and raisins and nuts. At 4 pm, I preshaped and then shaped and left in the banneton for another 2 1/2 hours and then baked. It was really puffy and airy when it went into the oven. In retrospect, I think baking at 450 lid on for 30 minutes, and then another 20 with the lid off would have been better with this particular recipe. My DO gets very hot fast, so something to think about with the raisins. I also wondered if I should have added some oil either to the dough or the bowl. But it really is delicious and light. The white red fife and rye made for a stickier dough than I was expecting.

My next attempt might be with cheese and herbs - Dan your bread was inspiring! 

Flo, what a great celebration of your recipe!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Looks great, inside and out. And if it tastes good, it's a keeper!

Enjoy your breakfast ☺

Carole 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

and I bet it tasted good! yum!!

Amazing how many different breads have popped up!

Leslie

FloArnaud's picture
FloArnaud

Yes Syros it is a fantastic celebration and I can not be prouder of you all as I am : you are all wonderful.

What I loved about the 1.2.3 formula, along with its simplicity and fantastic way of never having too much or too little sourdough to bake when I wanted to, was that it gave me all freedom to bake as I felt it the day I baked.

You are all taking it to the next level. Bravo and thanks again.

I will soon post here some of the recipes I had created in 2011 with Jen from aulevain.fr for our book project.

Happy baking !

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I, for one look forward to your return. Especially if you'll be posting recipes. Are they the ones on your blog? If you're too busy, I'd be happy to translate some for you once my work calms down in about a week or two...

Bon retour à la maison, Flo 😄

syros's picture
syros

I was really worried how this one was going to turn out but I am very pleasantly surprised!

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Wow!  What great bakes in this thread so far!!!

Since I made 1-2-3 breads as my go-to formula while I was learning how to properly make sourdough bread, I had to jump in on this Community Bake!

This is pretty much my “every week” flour combination, just tweaked my usual formula to use Flo’s proportions:

350 starter (100%)

700g water

1050g Flour

  • 800g AP Flour
  • 145g Semolina
  • 60g Dark Rye

24g Salt

I mixed together everything but the salt and let it rest for about 30 minutes.  I then added the salt using the pinch method, then gave the dough about 20x S&F.  The dough was much wetter than my usual formula, I’m guessing because the WW flour was in the starter, so it was more than sufficiently hydrated at this point.  Rested again for 30 minutes, followed by 20x S&F.  Repeated on more time before about 90 minutes of bulk proofing at 75F.

Got the dough on my board, letter folded, divided and pre-shaped.  After cleaning up my dough container, I shaped the two rounds into batards, and set them back in the proofer in my bannetons lined with flour dusted towels (again, @ 75F.)  At this point, I was exhausted, so I only gave them 45 minutes before they went in the fridge overnight.  This morning, I pulled them out of the fridge to warm up a little while I preheated the oven to 475.  Both loaves were baked for 25 minutes covered, and 20 minutes uncovered.

I’m very pleased with how these turned out, and it was fun to use Flo’s formula again (been a while!)

Ready to go:

Scored:

Baked and cooling:

Blister closeup:

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Thanks for setting this CB up, Dan!  Great fun! 

R

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and love the idea to combine Semolina and rye....love to see the crumb and give that combination a go...

Do you usually use more flour because of the semolina?

I have probably written already in so many posts to give my durum/semolina from the deli in London a go...(great tip from Abe at the time)... Kat

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Use more flour?  Do you mean in the mix or the dusting on my towel liners?

For the mix, my usual formula tends to be 75% AP, 10% WW, 10% Semolina, 5% Rye.

If you meant the liners, then, no.....I was just really tired, so ended up being a bit heavy handed with the dusting. :)

I'll try to remember to get a crumb shot, but don't expect to slice these loaves until tomorrow, probably. :)

Rich

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and finger type faster than brain thinks!😂I meant the water.... so sorry' 🙄Kat

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

go faster than my brain all the time, Kat! :)

My weekly loaves are usually about 70% hydration (this seems to be the sweet spot for me and my handling skills), and I have not increased that percentage since I started using more semolina in the formula.  In fact, if you take a look at my blog post yesterday, I made baguettes at 65% with about 20% semolina, and I didn't really notice any difference in how the dough handled compared to other 65% formulas I have used.

Rich

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

”Since I made 1-2-3 breads as my go-to formula while I was learning how to properly make sourdough bread”

This formula is the very best (IMO) for bakers new to sourdough. I know of nothing else near as good for that purpose. 

Thanks for joining in...

Dan

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Happy baking!

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Haven't cracked these open yet, but I think they'll be tasty, too! :)

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Those look sooo good! I love semolina in bread!

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

I love the color and flavor that semolina brings to the party.  Looking forward to the first slices from these loaves.

Rich

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Blisters, bloom, ovenspring -- they look fake!

But I'll bet their really, really good.

Enjoy!

Carole

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

I promise! ;)  Just a really vigorous starter, and a bit of good fortune! :)

Thanks!

Rich

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

look forward to crumb!  you are on a roll for sure!

Leslie

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Enjoying sharing some of my weekly bakes again! ;)

Rich

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Cut into my remaining loaf this morning (gave the other to a neighbor), and am very happy with the crumb structure on this loaf.  It turned out great, and tastes fantastic.  I highly recommend this flour blend.  My normal formula is 75% AP, 10% WW, 10% Semolina and 5% WW.  In the 1-2-3, the percentages are a bit different since I feed my levain with WW flour.

Rich

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Which one is Wholewheat and which is white Wholewheat?

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

he mentions 75% AP, 10% WW, 10% Semolina, 5% Rye -- might've been a slip of the keyboard?

Carole

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

That makes sense!

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Yes, typo....  75% AP, 10% WW, 10% Semolina, 5% RYE.  :)  Sorry about that....need more coffee!

RIch

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

ever since you posted them. So I remembered there was rye in there :-D

BUT something doesn't seem to be adding up. You've got 350g of starter, you indicate that you've got 1050g of flour, but I only come up with 1005, if I add up your bullet points. Of course, I could always fall back on your percentages…

Enjoy your coffee!

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Yes, I can't add.  Well, the truth is that I changed the amounts a bit on the fly, and forgot to change the "Total Flour" header. :)

However, for my weekly bread that I make, those are the percentages.  They are a bit off on the 1-2-3 bread just because there is quite a bit higher percentage of starter than I normally use, and that's entirely WW fed.

If I'm being really analytical, my WW % in my weekly loaf is a little higher since I don't calculate the starter feed in my totals, just call them out as a percentage of the total flour mix (not including the starter/levain.)  Here's my usual formula if you feel like doing the actual math. :)

1000g KA AP

100g KA WW

100g Bob's Semolina

50g Bob's Dark Rye

250g starter/levain (100% hydration, fed w/KA WW)

803g water

26g salt

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Baker's percent -- for this particular loaf, at any rate -- is pretty straightforward. But thanks for sharpening your pencil!

Have a good day.

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

I caught the humorous intent! :)  The great thing is, it's all (good) bread! On to my second cup of joe now.....

Rich

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and that's going to be my next bake...only that I have no dark rye and shall have some Emmer flour instead of the dark rye....your loaves just look too good with that semolina and flour combo...!!!!  Kat

p.s. I wonder what would happen if  I were to use semolina instead of the WW in the starter for the leaven?

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and posted a bake inspired by your bake in my blog...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/57655/semolina-emmer-ww-and-white-loaf-inspired-richs-123-rwc

Couldn't sadly not post here as I did not adhere to the 123 rules with weights of ingredients....:D Kat

syros's picture
syros

Kat, that is beautiful. And please excuse my ignorance, but what is lamination? 

I have a bag of semolina durum flour, but I don’t think it’s the durum flour for bread. It’s an organic flour from La Milanaise and on the website it says good for making pasta. I haven’t had great luck with it in the past - but I wouldn’t mind trying a small amount. Still trying to get myself together for the next 123 bake. 

Sharon

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bncopq4aH1Y

and basically during bulk you stretch the dough out thinly and fold it over and then continue bulk.

I have never done it before but was intrigued and I think Ru is also using this method.

I assume it add extra strength to the dough combined with the long bulk at lower temp 73Fish...

My flour is from Caputo and is called Durum Wheat Semolina and very fine yellow flour. I think it is goof for making pasta but works well mixed with other flours for bread too....the texture reminds me of working with Khorasan a bit...

So just using the combo WW, emmer or rye and semolina resulted in a lovely crumb and yellowish crust and a very slight hue to the crumb....I might try a bit more semolina next time....give it a go....Although my bread was 81% hydration it did not feel that wet and I think the WW, emmer and semolina absorbed a lot of water...

Lamination I hear is also useful to add seeds etc. but have not tried that myself...Happy baking...Kat

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

an amazing loaf!

Enjoy it!

Carole

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

that it is a 1:4:5 loaf and did not occur to me at all and most of it gone already.

Maybe we can instigate a 1:4:5 bake with lots of WW soaking up the water! :D Kat

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Some of us have math minds, while others. ..

I'm not sure I could wrap my brain around 1.4.5!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

s:w:f.     0:1:2 (50%)   0:2:3 (67%)   0:3:4 (75%)  0:4:5: (80%)       1:2:3 (71%)   1:3:4 (78%)   1:4:5 (82%)  1:8:10 (81%)

If it seems confusing it really is not.  The first number is amount of 100% hydrated starter (zero could be yeast.) Compare starter amount to flour amount. That tells you an approximate average of time needed to fully ferment providing the flour can handle it.  Comparing water to flour tells the hydration in ( ) above.  Don't forget the starter flour and water!

Note: 1:2  Water is one half (50%) of the flour weight.  In 1:2:3, the starter gets split evenly so hydration is 2.5/3.5 or 71%.

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

I think it is so much easier to think about it in ratios rather than trying to calculate hydration...and will post this on a post it somewhere handy in my kitchen! So, next time rather than just looking at formulas I can go hmmmm today it is 1:2:3 or maybe a 1:3:4 for this flour or if I am brave a 1:8:10 ....ha, ha Kat

p.s. I also saw a post from you a while ago where you suggested to add Chia seeds dry (rather than soak and then it turns to jelly) to flour mix and this is what I am doing right now for another 1:4:5 ish and added 3 X the amount of water for the weight of seeds....First time for me and we shall see...

syros's picture
syros

my math skills are wanting. I’m still trying to figure out how long to proof or how much water works with which type of flour! Yikes

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

When it comes to proofing time, it is best to watch your dough. Even if you perfectly matched the flour, hydration, and temperature of a known good formula, how can we be assured that our starters are equally matched. The answer, we can’t. Observe the dough as it proofs. It is also very helpful if the author gives us a percentage of rise. It is recently suggested as of late to complete the Bulk Ferment when the dough rises only 30-50%. If what I read lately is accurate, it seems most of us ferment too long.

Hydration - how much water. If you mix by hand, determining hydration is less difficult. Learn to trust your senses. You know a whole lot more than you think. We all do. Hold out a little water from a new formula and mix your dough. If you use Rubaud, stretch and fold or any other “_____” and folds, you can slowly add the water as to work the dough. You’ll know when the dough comes together and feels right.

I think it is wise to read, listen, and learn from bakers that are skilled and experienced. But as we develop our senses, we do well to trust them.

It seems that many of the great sourdough bakers are more artist than scientists. They work with formulas, but follow their hearts :-)

HTH

Dan

syros's picture
syros

You’re right of course, it’s just that when I’m reading some of the bakes, I’m amazed at some of the process. Like your latest seeded bread. But you’re right, watch the dough, trust my instincts, and learn from others. I have learned a ton from this site and from the help of others. 

It’s just so much fun to learn all of this. 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

it come out, Kat?  Eager to see your loaf!

Carole

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

based on Rich's 123 inspired loaf and using Semolina, Emmer, WW and white...and Chia seeds. I assume that  you mean this one? I should have used more Chia seeds as used only 30g for 1kg flour and will double next time...

Adding seeds dry worked really well I felt and did not affect the gluten structure. It makes the dough though wetter I felt and knowing what my pre-mix dough kind of should feel like, I just added another 50g of white flour...However, after the overnight pre-mix in the wine cooler at 15C it was firmer...still on the higher hydration side but had that 1:4:5 feel...especially once I added the leaven.

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I'm not sure I'm quite ready yet for 1:4:5, but it's true that there are times when I feel like the 1:2:3 can be just a touch dry.

I've never tasted chia seeds, will have to get some and give it a go.

Happy Monday!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and just use that adding water slowly trick and see what your flour can do and tell the dough you are boss with those coil folds as well as slap and folds and you will get there when you feel ready...It is only recently that I go into that territory...

Chia seeds are packed apparently with protein and taste great! They are so hidden that even my son eats seeded bread without realizing it!  

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

So you mixed your dough at 1:4:5, then added the chia seeds plus 3x their weight in additional water? Wow! That must indeed have felt pretty wet -- I'm not sure if my French flour will manage that too well (although I do have one now that's 12% protein, as opposed to the >10% that I used to get).

Thanks for the tips!

Carole

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

but when I use chia seeds, i make sure to toast them. That seems to stop them from soaking up unbelievable amounts of water and makes them behave more like normal seeds such as sunflower seeds. They do taste great in bread!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

That's good to know. Do they pop as they toast? I remember the first time I toasted flax seeds -- the stuff was flying all over the kitchen before I could grab a lid to put on it! :-D

Lazy as I am, I prefer to toast OR soak, but sometimes doing both just feels like drudgery…

Bonne journée!

Carole

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

for jumping all over the place when toasting them. Chia seeds are fine. 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Just didn't want to be caught by surprise ;-)

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

I noticed that they taste great when I toasted the bread as well as making the Semolina crust really crunchy!

Shall try that next time...toast seeds, soak them and then go the lamination route and add them there...

I heard that you must watch the toasting though not to make them too bitter? Kat

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

in colour. Yes, I do stand there stirring and watching but it doesn’t take long with a preheated frying pan. 

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and my bakes are blurring together but I think I withheld some water with this one and mixed together with the salt like a Champlain pre-mix and in fact may have not added the additional 90g water for the Chia seeds in the end as I just used the 800g water and put the pre-mix in the wine cooler at 12C at night..

It was firmer and better in the morning and decided it didn't need the additional water for the seeds once the leaven was added...so in essence just stuck with the 1:4:5 ratio...plus seeds..

Sorry, I make things a bit up as a go and judge more the texture of the dough...changing things as I go along..which is probably terrible! Kat

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I do the same, but that gets me into trouble sometimes, because when I hit upon something that works, I can't remember what I did :-P At my level, that's a really silly thing to do.

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I noticed that you got the double ears! Sweeet!

Kat, do you think the Chia loaf was under-proofed?  Not criticizing, just trying to learn. 

The reason I ask is because of the very large holes and the smaller ones. Also the gigantic bloom. The score opened so wide.

Since the larger holes are situated near the top, I am thinking the large pockets expanded greatly from the heat of the oven. The expansion caused the huge bloom at the top and opened up the score.

I would like to hear from others concerning their opinions and thoughts.

Since running the Under/Over Proofed test I have made a habit of studying crust and crumb shots to sharpen my evaluation skills. Isn’t learning to better troubleshoot our crumb the very best way to improve our fermentation.

Danny

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

the dough was super-proofy as I used a very long bulk combined with the lamination technique and I know that the bake was pushed when it comes to bulk and rose more than beyond 50% ....so I tried very hard not to degas the dough as it was soo proofy...

So I put it in the wine cooler for 2 1/2 hours at 4C (but it is in effect warmer than that) to slow it down but it still did rise with the 75F that it would have had  from the bulk..

To be honest, I probably could have left it longer in the wine cooler and push it but played it safe...when it comes to the texture is it light rather then dense as I had with my truly underproofed loaves...so I agree that it probably could have gone a bit further but felt also not massively underproofed for instance when I compare it to one of my underproofed 'fool's crumb' loaf in the past..

Difficult call and probably could push proof in the wine cooler a bit more.... I am always happy to learn and appreciate what other people think and very open to honest opinions...how do we otherwise learn?  Thank you for sharing your thoughts....Kat

p.s. Oh forgot...this one also stuck a bit to the cloth so very happy that it ended up not a total disaster..ha, ha...

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Kat, reading your reply makes me think that if the BF is over-proofed, then the resulting crumb can’t be under-proofed. This train of thought inspires a question. Is it possible to over-proof the bulk ferment, and then by under-proofing the final proof, produce a crumb that is under-proofed?

I dedicated a post to that question HERE. Maybe it would be best to reply to THIS POST so that this thread doesn’t get of track.

Dan

It seems more possible to under-proof the BF and then either correctly proof or over-proof the final proof. My thoughts are based upon consideration of the alveoli and the affect of the CO2 gas.

OK, I am often thinking out loud :-D

 

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

like you to investigate further...

I have to re-visit the thread on bulk fermentation with Maurizio and Trevor's  comments again.

However, I thought that letting bulk go very proofy can be a way of building structure but comes with the risk to de-gas the dough during shaping and I guess that the dough runs out of strength and you risk lack of oven spring which then would result in a flat dough or not? Is this not why people say to let bulk go only 30% or 50%?

So, interesting question what will happen if you have pushed the bulk with a super proofy and well fermented dough with a lot of structure and then cut the 2nd proof too short?  I need to look at 'Open crumb' again what Trevor says on bulk fermentation and 2nd proof....:D Kat

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I can't seem to stop now! We need bread here, and you guys are inspiring me. This one had the same basic formula (100 grams of 100% hydration starter, 200 grams of water, 225 grams of unbleached baker's flour and 75 grams of whole wheat flour) with 2% salt. The add-ins this time were toasted sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds, and cooked polenta with a dollop of yogourt mixed in. I'm not sure of the amounts of any of those - just eyeballed it.

It fermented much more quickly than the first couple of loaves. The weather is a bit warmer and my starter is happier now. It was almost over-fermented after six hours. I shaped it, proofed for about an hour then baked it in the enameled roaster. Very nice toasted for breakfast this morning. 🙂

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

that is superb! For any bake, actually.

Just beautiful and yummy looking.

Enjoy!

Carole 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

what a lovely oven spring and crumb! beautiful!

and all this with flours you don’t really know! very talented indeed!

Leslie

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and the crumb is also beautiful....! Just love the look where the bread burst open and you can see all those seeds bursting to be seen! Lovely! Kat

syros's picture
syros

Wow, beautiful looking. I have to try adding yogurt when I bake. I’m so afraid to stray too far from the path!! So many inspirational recipes!

cfraenkel's picture
cfraenkel

I am excited to take part in my first community bake.  I have been at this sourdough adventure for a couple of years now, and have truly enjoyed reading everyone's advice and posts.  Garbage bread started many many years ago, with frozen bread dough from my favorite place, Trader Joes!  I learned that my kids would eat all kinds of things if I "hid" them in bread, or spaghetti sauce or ...  It all started with trying to make a "portable" pizza when one of them was in their only wanting to eat pizza faze.  I would cut up pepperoni and sauce and cheese and roll it up in a log, and tell them it was "pizza bread."  It worked!  So then I started really just putting whatever I could into the bread.  Broccoli, onions, whatever leftover meat was in the fridge etc.  and Garbage Bread was born.  If it has cheese it can't be bad!

So for this 123 challenge, I set out to use up what I had hanging around.

Starter (leftover from many thanksgiving loaves) 160g (don't ask what was in it - see note about leftovers - I took what I had added flour and water in more or less equal proportions and waited for it to be bubbly)

320g water

480g flour.  about 40+ g of leftover freshly milled combo hard white and spelt, 320g Organic White flour, 120g white spelt

10g salt

I had just finished baking  for thanksgiving (sage and onion brioche for the stuffing, plain sourdough for the table, sourdough banana bread for the granddaughter) and I was baked out...so I mixed all the above together, threw it in the Kitchenaide for 15 minutes  added a knob of butter and let it go for another 5 minutes.  Let it sit until bedtime (about 5 hours) and rolled it out into a rectangle.  While the kitchenaide was doing it's work, I found apple and sage sausage in the fridge that I forgot to put in the stuffing, made some carmelized onions to go with it, and then grated some cheddar on top and sprinkled with some mystery grated cheese that I found in the fridge).  I rolled the whole thing into a log, put it in a basket lined with parchment and stuffed it in a plastic bag and put it in the fridge overnight and most of the day until I got home. (I'm pretty sure it over proofed, but I had very little choice, the DH doesn't "do" bread he only eats it)  I managed (barely) to stuff it into my roasting pan and bake at 450df for 25 minutes lid on and 25 minutes lid off. 

Photos on the blog post

 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

and I like the spirit of your loaf! Hardly "garbage", it looks nice and shiny and nourishing. A meal in a slice :-)

I hope everyone enjoyed it.

Carole

cfraenkel's picture
cfraenkel

it actually tastes great.  I have no idea why it is shiny, sausage grease? 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

In any case, it makes it look very much like a viennoiserie! I'll bet it didn't last too long :-D

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Okay, last one I promise. I whipped this one up yesterday and baked this morning because we had several people here for soup lunch. This was a simple 123 with unbleached bread flour. The add ins were 20 ml of olive oil and a bunch of chopped fresh rosemary. The dough developed quickly and was very silky after a few hours of bulk ferment, so I popped it in the fridge overnight. A quick shape this morning, a couple of hours final proof and into the roasting pan to bake. We needed it for lunch so it was cut while warm (generally a no-no in my house!) and completely devoured. It was soft, moist and utterly delicious. And now we're out of bread again!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I tell you that you're amazing.

Lovely again. Love crumb! 

Carole 

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Every bread on here is wonderful, and this challenge was way too much fun. Well done, all!

syros's picture
syros

That is a great bread. I’ve had company and no time to bake and I’ve been wanting to do a bake with fresh rosemary. So yummy! Thank you! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Check the blog for the details

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I decided to try the 123 using commercial yeast and eliminating the starter. The same ratios were used. For the levain, a poolish using a pinch of Instant Dry Yeast was used. The Levain fermented overnight, the bulk ferment ran for 3.5 hours and the proof, about 1 hour. The kitchen temperature was about 75F.

The bread rose to super heights and the bloom was out of sight. I missed the proof, should have left it to proof longer.

The 123 formula is versatile enough to be used with commercial yeast!

Danny

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

you're going to give me an inferiority complex (bake pix to follow).

Gorgeous and amazing! How'd it taste?

Carole

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

The Taste... I was going to leave this unsaid... The following is my personal opinion and I’m sure that some will not agree. With the exception of a very few breads, yeasted breads can’t be compared to sourdough. To me, sourdough bread is a stand alone meal. It can be eaten as is, or much better, with butter alone. Yeasted breads are good for holding things, like meat, cheese, mayonnaise. Most yeasted breads need help. This bread without additional add-ins needs help.

I think we all get accustomed to the flavor of sourdough. If you want to re-appreciate the flavor of SD breads, just bake up a bread with commercial yeast. I guarantee, that will bring you back!

Oh, a favorite yeasted bread of mine that is a knock-out is Hawaiian Style Portuguese Sweet Bread. But it relies on a number of add-ins for flavor.

Danny

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Okay, I think I blew it this bake, but I always try to find way to use up ingredients hanging arou,nd in the fridge or the pantry…

Starter

180g 100% whole-rye, in two stages

Liquid

180g veggie stock

180g potato water

Final dough

All the starter

50g semolina (extra-fine, not durum flour)

60g breadcrumbs from a previous whole-grain loaf

430g T65 flour

324g of the liquid (held back 10% just in case)

10g salt

Evening, Bake day –2

Fed 12g of 100% starter at 1:2:2

Upon doubling, fed the resulting 60g at 1:1:1

Stuck in the fridge before bedtime

Afternoon, Bake day –1

Removed levain from fridge

Mixed dough ingredients, minus the salt, with the 324g of liquid, left to autolyse for about an hour. Mixture felt stiff, but held off on adding reserved water until after adding starter.

Mixed in starter, at which point the dough felt very soft and quite sticky. Rested 10 minutes, then added the salt.

SLAFs for about 15 minutes, with a short break about halfway through. Dough still soft, but not sloppy; tacky but not sticky.

Removed dough to lightly oiled container, sprinkled about 15g of reserved liquid and left to rest for 30 minutes.

Three sets of STAFs over the course of two hours, Then into the fridge for about 6 hours.

Evening, Bake day –1

Removed dough from fridge. Much nicer feeling, airy and billowy. Gave one last set of folds.

Preshape, 30-minute rest, shape, 10-minute bench-rest and into the fridge for overnight.

Bake day

Preheated oven (not long enough, I fear), removed loaves from fridge, spritzed, sprinkled with black sesame seeds, spritzed, slashed and spritzed again. Bake 30 minutes covered, 20 minutes uncovered.

The loaves spread more than they rose, and I really did think I'd get a more open crumb.

Should I have preheated longer (oven was at 230°C, but barely just), or let the loaves warm up a little -- or both?

Danny, you wanted someone to post a flop -- here I am :-D

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

And I know exactly what your problem is. I know because I have the same problem, and I bet so do a bunch of other bakers on this site.

If I would have posted that bread with those pictures as my bread, you would have raved. We perfectionist judge ourselves so much harder that we judge others. Tell me if I’m lying ;-)

I’ve actually had the following happen to me. I am looking over various images of bread. I view a new image and my mind is blown. The bread is absolutely gorgeous! I am envious. And then I realize I am looking at an old image of a bread I baked. But, at the time it was baked, it didn’t look so spectacular to me.

Can you relate?

You bread is a knock-out and you should give yourself credit!

Danny

OH! We’ve gone “Trevor Bananas” around here. And I think he might agree. He has said as much in past post. Your crumb is open, light, airy, and lacey. Anyone should be proud to bake such a crumb.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I’m curious. I am asking others to write in their brutually honest opinion of Carole’s bread. Please feel free to disagree.

Dan

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

really post this?

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I don’t get it. I really think the slices are outstanding. I have chased the art of baking extreme open crumb. But, IMO those slices are my ideal, when it comes down to bread for eating. I realize not everyone wants the same type of crumb. So beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

The bread could have risen higher. But I’ve never baked a bread that was too high, so that could be said of all my breads :-D

Dan

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I think it's more a question of scale. Those are not pumpkin seeds, they're sesame seeds. See how they look in relation to the alveoli? 

I'm not chasing wildly open crumb,  although it would be nice once in a while, I agree that the structure looks okay -- but small. Do you see what our mean?

And, again, not true: I remember one of your loaves rising so high it hit the lid of your DO!  :😄

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Not true -- if your name had been attached to these photos, I'd've said 'Hmm, nice, but Danny seems a bit off his game today." Now, I'm not denying that i've made progress; I've been at this for over six months now… it's just that the dough felt so right this time that maybe my expectations were too high.

Now, I'm a long way from the "I'm-on-the-verge-of-tears" frustration that you and others have so kindly nursed me through; it tastes great, texture is crunchy outside, chewy inside. I guess it's all about looks and the lack of predictability.  Which is also largely my fault, too. I keep adding things to the mix, instead of making just one recipe over and over again till I've "nailed it". So, all in all, I guess if I have to sacrifice looks for fun and experimentation, I should keep quiet and keep experimenting :-D

Thanks so much,

Carole

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I would be quite happy with that crumb. But I know what you mean about high expectations of one’s self. I just went through a stage where all my breads were not getting the oven spring I wanted. And I was trying all sorts of different things at once (which really doesn’t help to narrow things down) and starting to get frustrated. Took me a bit but I finally figured out that the main culprit was letting the bulk and proof go too long, although changing how I develop the gluten and how I shape helped too. And no, I did not practice doing the same bread over and over again. I wanted a technique that would work with all doughs. Keep at it, you’ll get to the point you will be happy with what comes out of your oven! And your bread does look good! Bet it is delicious and that’s the main thing!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Well, this bake happened the way it did because I tended, I Hinksey,  to short-change the bulk, resulting in dense loaves with unfulfilled potential. So this time, I tried retarding everything. 

It may be shaping, these needed longer baskets than what I usually use. Will try again -- and again 😀

EDIT: I think (not "Hinksey", don't know where that came from)

Portus's picture
Portus

... of ingredients that, with the wave of a Harry Potter wand, delivered a most challenging and attractive loaf; congrats!

This brought to mind my maternal grandmother who could not swallow pills; we used to crush them up to sprinkle over an apricot jam sandwich that she would consume with tea. I swear she reconstituted them in her mouth whilst chewing and eventually deposit them onto her teaspoon!!

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

So this would have made the ideal Ham sandwich for nonna?  😄

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

This is a lovely looking bread with the seeds on top and the crumb is so lacy, light and beautiful!

I would call that a massive success!!!! I can relate though what you mean with being hard on yourself and the dough not doing what you want it to do! Yep...can totally relate to that...But I truly believe that the crumb here is 'light' and that is key to me nowadays rather than open....I think you should be very proud!!!! .:D Kat

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

"Massive success" is probably as great an exaggeration as "flop", but I do appreciate your kind words. It's just that sometimes I look at all those beautifully domed (or eared) loaves, and I try to come up to that level -- and get these rinky-dinky 500g loaves that often look more like fat pitas than hearth loaves.

But I am touched and reassured by the kind words that you and the others have sent my way. So, thanks!

Enjoy your semolina/rye bake!

Carole

syros's picture
syros

When I see your ingredients and your process, I am amazed. I don’t think I would have the wherewithal to have done what you did. Not sure I still understand under/overproofing, how long a dough can have a cold retard in the fridge, all the things that you did were fantastic. 

Success is subjective - so I can’t taste the bread to judge, but from appearances, it’s looks great. And yes, sometimes a flop is a flop but this one doesn’t look like that to me!

Sharon

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I've already made bread with potato water or veggie stock or bread crumbs; I've retarded the bulk or the proof. This time, I decided to mash all of that together to see what happened :-D

Like you, I'm still trying to figure out the over/underproof/retard thing, and Dan's and Leslie's experiments were also being put into play. So, I didn't know what to expect, although it's apparent from my reaction that I was expecting too much!

So maybe "flop" would be an exaggeration, and "letdown" closer to the truth!

Keep on baking -- and enjoy it!

Thanks for your kind words.

Carole

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

blinded by the light of a spectacular star being born in the Universe or even a parallel one or two.  That crumb is just plain perfect and the shape for section cut is also very nice.  Nothing to complain about.  Way better than the crumb we got on our loaf for sure.  Your holes are almost too big for bruchetta and it would have been marked down for being too holey in any Italian toasted bread competition.

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I bet you say that to all the girls!

I gotta say, it tastes pretty darn yummy, so there! One of these days I'll try a mega-loaf like yours!

Enjoy the day.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

 so that I could use the 123 formula for 100% whole grain bread.

1 part starter : 2 parts water : 3 parts whole spelt flour

Incorporated a mixed rice porridge (red and purple) with 1.5 times whey to rice flour weight. 

Resultant hydration: 92% (I did way more calculation than I usually do to come up with this...)

 

Please refer to my blog post for details.

7oaks's picture
7oaks

 

Hi all,

 

 This is my first post to this site. I have been baking for about 2 years, starting with an old Breadmaker and graduating to a more traditional approach to bread making using a starter. I have collected various books on Bread and have been following this site for a little while as a guest. I am also lucky enough to have met Abe on line and he has been a tremendous source of help and encouragement.

 

When I saw this thread 10 days or so ago I was intrigued and thought that this might be an opportunity for me to bake my first loaf without following a recipe. I live in England and so my flours will reflect local availability. In my cupboard I have a bag of a blend of mixed grain flour (over 1215 varieties) and seeds celebrating the signing of Magna Carta in 1215 and is the foundation of the UK's democracy. I have been trying to find an appropriate recipe to use this flour and 123 has prompted me to use this together with strong bread flour.

 

I used 150g of 100% hydrated starter, 300g of water, 40g honey, 30g olive oil and 450 g flour (150g Magna Carta and 300g strong bread flour (plus 5g diastatic malt flour) and 10g salt.

 

I mixed all of the ingredients to a rough dough and let it rest for 1 hour (ambient temp 21°C).

 

After the rest I gently worked the dough into a ball. I allowed a further bulk ferment of 6.5 hours including 3 sets of stretch and folds in the first couple of hours.

 

I then pre-shaped, bench rest for 10 mins, shaped and turned the dough into a banneton and placed into the fridge overnight (12 hours).

 

I baked the loaf at 230°C for one hour in a DO, first 20 mins covered, 30 mins lid off and a final 10 mins with the loaf directly on the oven shelf. 

 

Perhaps the loaf is over- caramelised but the height looks good to me and the crust is crisp and the crumb relatively soft and with even holes. The taste is lovely, the crumb feels moist but no gumminess on the knife.

 

Thank you all for introducing me to this formula.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Looks like you take the highest honors for the most ingredients used in a 123, and probably anyother bread for that matter :-D

1215 various grains and seeds. WOW! I wish I could order that in the states.

Your bread looks great. How would you describe the taste?

I look forward to hearing more from you in the future.

Dan

syros's picture
syros

Lovely bread! Good for you! That flour sounds amazing! Looking forward to more bakes by you.

Sharon

7oaks's picture
7oaks

Hi Sharon, Thanks for your comments. As to future bakes I will certainly repeat the 123 formula both with the Magna Carta flour and probably others too. I only bake about every 10 days or so and my next intended bake is Lugg and Fjeld's Pain de Campagne. It is a recipe that I have not used before.

Alan

Abe's picture
Abe

And what a great first post. I hope you post many more of your bakes here. 

I love bold bakes with a dark crust. It'll be the honey contributing to that. These flour blends from bakerybits are delicious and putting it in a 1:2:3 recipe is a great idea. 

I know these flour blends, while delicious, can be a challenge but you've got great height out of this loaf. I've gotta get me some more. I did enjoy the medieval peasant blend.  

7oaks's picture
7oaks

Abe, thanks for your comments. I think that the crust was darker than I intended, it is not only the dough that needs watching!

You are so right about the heritage flour blends, I intend to keep a bag for those bakes that do not follow recipes from books.

Alan

7oaks's picture
7oaks

Hi Dan,

I believe that you can buy Magna Carta in US as Bakerybits here in UK stock it and ship worldwide.

Thank you for your kind comments. As for the taste, the seeds have a real impact, I could certainly taste sesame.

Alan

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Thanks Alan. I did check out Bakery Bits. A very nice site. I think the shipping will be too high, but Kat, aka not.a.crumb.left is not far away. I’ll send her a message, she might be interested.

For any interested in the grain seed mix, it can be seen here. https://www.bakerybits.co.uk/magna-carta-blend-mixed-grain-flour-and-seeds.html

Dan

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I’ve been experimenting with whole spelt. And seeds always make a loaf better. I went 50% whole spelt, 50% breaf flour (14% protein). 6% of each, sunflower, quinoa, hemp, and 4% poppy seeds. And for added sweetness, 20% honey.

Guess what! I tried mixing the untoasted and unsoaked seeds in with the dry ingredients (flours and salt). That was added to the water and starter mix. The bread turned out moist, tasted great, and baked up well. By the way, I didn’t add extra water for the add ins. I am excited to learn this short cut.

Did 4 sets of Coil Folds for the first hour. Bulk Fermented for 12 hr @ 72F. Put dough in freezer for 20 min before shaping (no pre-shape), proofed an hour @ 72F, then went back to freezer for 20 min. Turned out cold dough into preheated oblong clay baker and scored.

Seeds ramp up the flavor of every bread...

Danny

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and it has that beautiful honeycomb crumb! Kat

syros's picture
syros

Wow, Danny. You make me want to be adventurous and take risks! Nice bread! 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Love the shape of the loaf and the crust color! I'm curious about the color of your crumb: did you add coffee to this dough? It just seems so much browner than Abe's all-spelt loaf.

Thrilled to hear that your unsoaked seeds worked out and needed no additional hydration!

Hope you enjoyed it, for a change!

Carole

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I think the sugars from the honey contributed to the color. I feel very fortunate to have enjoyed such early success baking with high percentages of spelt.

Danny

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

I forgot about the honey. Of course! It's an amazing color!

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

For anybody who is so inclined, here is a link to a current copy of my design tool:

Sourdough Formulation Design Rev1

Instructions are on the second sheet.
{note that while you can open it on an iPad or with a mobile browser on a phone, the instructions page is either inaccessible or shows as blank because the instructions are in a text box that overlays the spreadsheet. The solution is to download the file and open it with Excel, or at least use a browser that runs on a real computer (Mac or PC)}

Not for everybody but both powerful and flexible.

Input percentage of the flour that is to be pre-fermented, levain hydration, desired dough hydration, %salt, and total dough weight

You get exact weights for levain build (starter, water, flour) accounting for bowl and scraper losses and CO2 lost during fermentation; added water, flour, salt to make the desired dough weight as a single batch.

PM me if you have questions.

Portus's picture
Portus

... that's what this Community bake has become, for me at least.  For this weekend's 123 bake I swapped out 20% bread flour for 10% each of spelt and home-ground pearl barley.  The barley lends quite a distinct flavour to the loaf that may be a good accompaniment for old fashioned vegetable barley soup next winter.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Joe, the image of your loaf is picturesque. Everything about it is perfect, including the burlap cloth.

Do you find that as little as 10% spelt makes for a much more extensible dough?

The blisters are gorgeous. Did you retard the dough?

I am glad the CB (Community Bakes) have received so much participation. The focus and intent of the CB is to get as many people as possible to bake and share their baking experiences with the entire group. Hopefully we can all learn together to be better bakers. The concept of uniting like minded bakers from the world over is coming to fruition. I hope to post future bakes in a timely manner and that the breads that are elected to be featured suite the majority of those willing to participate. It’s all about the group...

 If you are any one has a suggestion for future bakes or any other improvements, please PM me and let me know. I say again, it is all about the best interest of the group.

Dan

Portus's picture
Portus

... the iPhone camera is amazing.  The burlap/linen cloth was gifted to me from Lithuania, and works well in extending a loaf's shelf life.

With spelt the dough probably handled a bit easier, though I did not detect a remarkable change from the norm.  I thought, however, that it may lack hydration with 20% whole wheat in addition to the spelt and barley, but it seems not when looking at the end product.  It certainly did not spread sideways during baking as I thought it might, but this could be owing to the decent pinch of diastatic malt I tossed onto the mix.

I retard almost all my bakes at 4C, though the blistering was also consequent to a few decent spritzes of water.  Retarding overnight suits my schedule, otherwise my weekends would be totally bespoken for!

Joe

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I was surprised with the 123 hydration. My last 123 used 50% whole spelt and 22% non-soaked seeds. And the original formula was fine. I didn’t add additional water. Maybe the 20% honey had an affect on that. The bread was mosit and had a great flavor.

I am beginning to wonder if the “high hydration craze” is really necessary.

Dan

Portus's picture
Portus

... got me wondering if hydration is affected in any manner through excessive steaming/spritzing?  The topic of steaming was comprehensively discussed in http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/51541/more-consistency-lets-talk-about-steam, but I do not recall if this question was raised/answered.

There is a distinct difference in causation between internal hydration and external water/steam/spritzing, but I wonder of there is there a link, however slight? I do believe that excess in either can cause a sticky crumb.

Joe

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I can’t say for sure, but the thought of external water penetrating a dough (and affecting the crumb) that is being baked in a super hot oven doesn’t sound plausible. At 212F water turns to vapor.

If you find out differently, I’d like to know.

Are you waiting long enough for your bread to cool before slicing? I know that will cause a wet crumb.

Danny

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Love the moody crumb shot!

Hope you enjoyed it.

Carole

Portus's picture
Portus

... "Moody crumb"?  I like it - could be a blues band! Taste was lovely, though toasted slices are quite dry and crispy.  I wonder if the barley/spelt mix affects residual water content of the loaf?

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

Beautiful all around crust, ear, blisters...crumb....a joy to see! Kat

Portus's picture
Portus

... you are most kind! Joe

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

Looks like we're all kinda hooked!

The problem with the 1:2:3 formula is that it's too easy to remember, which means I'm not as disciplined as I ought to be about writing down what went into which bake!

This was a midweek bake for my associate who was heading down to her country home for the school holidays this week: 10% breadcrumb, 10% semolina and T65 flour; half veggie stock/half dead AYW. This is a riff on Susan's breadcrumb sourdough, which is itself her spin on her Norwich sourdough. Aside from the levain build the night before, this was all done in one day.

I think I tossed a couple of tablespoons of poppy seeds and toasted sunflower seeds in the dough.

And I had a bit of chocolate starter left from the choco-orange 1:2:3, so decided to use that in the banana bread recipe in Cultures for Health. Swapped out 25% of the flour for almond meal, added a bunch of raisins and an extra banana.

Love these recipes, they're so incredibly flexible.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Carole, I noticed that Susan’s Breadcrumb Sourdough counts the 10% breadcrumbs as flour. This doesn’t seem correct to me. I think the breadcrumbs should be handles as an add in. I say this because the breadcrumbs were baked and any enzymes that the original flour contained has been destroyed.

I hope others with knowledge of this will reply to set the record straight.

I’m not sure if you handled the crumbs as flour or add ins, but in this case it probably didn’t make a huge difference. I’m just curious to learn.

Dan

Looks like you’ve been busy baking.

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

That's a very good point, I think; I did handle them as flour -- my thinking never got as far as you did about it (so what else is new?)

So, the next time, I'll try them as an add-in!

Thanks for pointing that out!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I count them as non-gluten flour as they will affect the matrix if too much is added.  Crumbs will gel in the heat if wheat and the will contribute to crumb texture.  There are many recipes that include bread crumbs and plain or spiced croutons too.

What do you think about trying to make a 1,2,3 recipe and sub out half the flour with bread cubes?  Something pouring the starter and liquids over the bowl of cubes and toss to coat.  Let them sit ten minutes to hydrate then toss in the flour and half the salt. (Salt may be already in the bread cubes.)  Shape into a log, let proof and bake.  It won't have big holes but it could be interesting.

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

Carole all looks so amazing and that banana bread! I am glad that I am not in your kitchen as that would go so quickly! Kat

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

to the banana bread recipe. It really is quite flexible and forgiving. Swapping out some of the flour for almond meal makes it more like cake then bread. And the starter in it is great.

Enjoy!