The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to replicate this?

ec116's picture
ec116

How to replicate this?

I am a very novice baker that has recently fallen in love with making bread at home. I have been following this community and have drawn advice that has been so helpful in my journey of bread making!

There is this bread I discovered from a local store that is so delicious - chewy in the inside and almost fllake in the outside. It's a seven grain bread (attached the picture of ingredients). I have tried to find a similar recipe but with no success. 

Anyone in this forum would be able to decipher how to make this delicious bread?

Thanks in advance!

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

But you say it's delicious and it is multigrain. How about Hamelman's 5 grain Levain?

http://ieatfood.net/2010/08/01/jeffrey-hamelmans-five-grain-levain/

ec116's picture
ec116

Thank you For posting this! I'll try it.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

There have been many posts about making multigrain bread  and even soft multigrain bread. You are also on a delicious learning curve that may take a while to master but you are definitely in the right place to shorten the timeline of that learning curve. Get comfortable posting, esp.pics and answering questions. Start with the search box and start scanning for information. I would find a recipe with similar ingredients (minus the unpronounceable ones,please) and start there. If you pursue a particular recipe, you need to develop skills for that particular type of bread and that means making it over and over while keeping notes.

Have delicious fun!

ec116's picture
ec116

Yes, I hate all the chemicals in it. I love the fact that it has fennel (although I cannot detect it or see it.. Hmm)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

is not to add so much that it can be detected outright.  It should be subtle.  Just a light sprinkle on top of the loaf or dough often meets most needs.  

 Whole seeds add little bursts of flavour.  Crush or grind for that little extra "something" you don't want immediately recognised.

That reminds me, a pinch of crushed on my beef roast would be perfect.  Be back in a few minutes.  :)

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

a little goes a long way!

AndyPanda's picture
AndyPanda

My best guess is that most of those ingredients, with the chemical sounding names, are there so the bread can hold up to being shipped out to stores and spend time on the shelf and still be soft and mold free a week or two after baking.

I bake bread at home that is whole grain and is soft and flexible and will keep for a week or more without mold (though it usually gets eaten within a day or two). The ingredients I use (in addition to the whole grains, yeast, water, salt) that help the texture and shelf life are:
Honey, lecithin, potato.

I grind my grains at home so they are always freshly ground just before I bake. That way I get the benefits of the oils that are in the germ. So I don't need to add any oil or fat. (I have many friends/family who are allergic to canola oil - the bread you posted has that oil added)

starvingviolist's picture
starvingviolist

I would start with a lean french bread or a white sandwich loaf recipe,, and add the extra ingredients after you reach medium gluten development. Try adding rolled oats, flax, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and if you like some rye and/or oat flakes, up to a maximum of about 40% of the flour weight. You can try other seeds and nuts as well. If you want a bit more lift, add 1.5-2% of the flour weight in vital wheat gluten to your flour. This recipe appears to be a slightly enriched white dough (the canola oil), with a nut and seed mixture added. The dextrose helps the crumb be a bit more crispy and most of other ingredients are to delay staling.

I agree that a levain loaf will get you a good result, but this looks like a basic lean recipe to me.

ec116's picture
ec116

Thank you! Medium development means after letting it ferment or after kneading? If I added flaxseed etc wouldn't it mess up the ratios between solids to liquids?

starvingviolist's picture
starvingviolist

Flax seeds are edible dry and raw, so they should be fine. Medium gluten development would be after kneading, but before folds. When the dough is stretchy but doesn't yet pass the windowpane test.

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

would it be possible to post a picture of a slice of the bread. This reminds me of the bread my mom liked.

wintermute's picture
wintermute

I was obsessed with baking whole grain bread for a while and I made the following recipe week in and week out.  My apologies that there are no weights here because I designed this recipe up before I owned a scale many years ago.  Generally I use about 4 oz flour for a cup when converting my old recipe.  It's a solid tried and true recipe and using Bob's red mill mix means you don't have to track down a bunch of grains separately.

 

1 cup bread flour

1/2 cup water

1/8 tsp instant yeast

 

1.5 cups water

3 Tbsp unsalted butter 

1 1/2 tsp table salt

1 Tbsp Barley Malt Syrup

1 cup Bob’s Red Mill 8 grain cereal mix

 

 2 tsp instant yeast

3 cups bread flour

 

1/4 cup each of sunflower and pumpkin seeds (optional)

oats for topping (optional)

 

 

Mix first three ingredients and allow them to ferment for 12-16 hours. 

 

Once the ferment mix has ripened to your liking, combine the water, butter, salt and malt syrup in a small saucepan and bring everything to a simmer.  As soon as bubbles begin to appear around the edge of the saucepan, shut of the heat and throw in the cereal mix making sure to it stir together well;  set that aside to cool.   Once it has cooled down to room temp, add it to the bowl with the pre-ferment and mix these together until a homogenous sticky batter/dough forms. 

 

Sprinkle the remaining 2 tsp yeast over this ferment/cereal mix and then start to add in the remaining flour until a soft sticky dough forms.  Place this out onto a floured surface or the work bowl of a mixer and begin to knead adding flour as necessary to keep the dough from sticking to our hands; the dough should be a little sticky but workable.  Once the dough is showing signs of good gluten development, knead in you seeds (if using) and place it in a bowl coated with oil and allow to rise.

 

After 1 hour of rising, lightly degas the dough and make a letter fold.  After 2 hours of rising fold again.

.

After 2 hours degas the dough and divide into 12 pieces.  Form the dough into rounds and place them into a greased 13 x 9 inch baking pan, spaced no more than an inch apart on all sides.  Preheat the oven to 425.  Cover the dough and allow to rise 30-45 minutes more while oven heats.  As soon as they appear swollen and puffy paint them with egg wash(1 yolk + 1 TBSP water) and sprinkle with a mixture of seeds or oats.  Bake about 25-30 minutes until golden brown and fragrant.

 

ec116's picture
ec116

This looks amazing! Will follow the recipe, but first definitely need to go shopping! Thank you so much, feels like I'm inheriting an heirloom.

wintermute's picture
wintermute

I haven't made this recipe in a while but your post got me thinking about it and I'm gonna resurrect the recipe this week. It can be made into any shape you want obviously but I always used to make it as pull-apart rolls. Here's some old pics for reference. Sorry no crumb shot.

wgrain_roll_02

Whole_Grain_Roll

nugaton's picture
nugaton

The first ingredient in the list is "Enriched wheat flour", so probably a high-protein white flour... and then some added grains or flours in a very low percentage. So it's probably a bread made like any commercial or industrial bread: high-protein flour, lots of yeast and lot of machine kneading. Something you probably won't be able to replicate at home. Also the chemical ingredients at the end of the list are helping with shelf life and tenderness. 
Personally, I would go for a real multigrain bread recipe.

ec116's picture
ec116

You're right, probably not a true multigrain. Will post a picture of the crumb.

ec116's picture
ec116

Thank you all for your comments! I'll definitely try your suggestions. I think about making bread every day. Will update you all after trying your tips!

I hate the unpronounceable ingredients, but what I'm after is the chewy texture and the flaky exterior. Will post a picture of the crumb soon.

 

nugaton's picture
nugaton

For chewy texture you might try the tangzhong technique (there are lots of posts in this site), and to achieve a flaky exterior just roll the loaf in grain flakes. And help yourself with steam at the oven or a combo cooker/dutch oven.