The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

April 1, 2013

My San Joaquin Sourdough originated in Anis Bouabsa's baguettes which had won the prize for the best baguette in Paris in 2008. Bouabsa's baguettes departed from convention in utilizing a 21 hour retardation after bulk fermentation and before dividing and shaping. Jane Stewart (Janedo on TFL) and I initially modified Bouabsa's formula by adding a bit of rye flour and some sourdough starter for flavor. I then omitted the commercial yeast altogether and began using the modified formula to shape as bâtards. Over time, I have tweaked the formula and method in various ways, but have settled on the current one as providing the best product.

Today's bake takes the San Joaquin Sourdough back to its roots, so to speak. I used my current formula and method to make San Joaquin Sourdough baguettes. I am very happy with the results.

 

Total ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

479

89

WW Flour

33

6

Medium rye Flour

29

5

Water

392

72

Salt

10

1.8

Liquid starter

17

3

Total

960

176.8

9.2% of the flour is pre-fermented

Liquid Levain ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

29

70

WW Flour

8

20

Medium rye Flour

4

10

Water

42

100

Liquid starter

17

40

Total

100

240

 

Final dough ingredients

Wt (g)

AP Flour

450

WW Flour

25

Medium rye Flour

25

Water

350

Salt

10

Liquid levain

100

Total

960

 

Method

  1. Mix the levain by dissolving the liquid starter in the water, then add the flours and mix well. Ferment at room temperature, covered tightly, until the surface is bubbly and wrinkled. (8-12 hours)

  2. Dissolve the levain in the water, add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.

  3. Add the salt and mix to incorporate.

  4. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly.

  5. Bulk ferment for 3-4 hours with stretch and folds in the bowl every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours, then a stretch and fold on the board after 2.5 hours. The dough should have expanded by about 50% and be full of small bubbles.

  6. Refrigerate the dough for 18-24 hours.

  7. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and transfer it to a lightly floured board.

  8. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces and pre-shape as logs or round.

  9. Cover the pieces and allow them to rest for 60 minutes.

  10. Shape as baguettes and proof for 45 minutes, covered.

  11. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

  12. Transfer the baguettes to your peel. Turn down the oven to 480ºF. Score the loaves and load them onto your baking stone.

  13. Bake with steam for 10 minutes, then remove your steaming apparatus and continue to bake for another 10-12 minutes. (Note: After 10 minutes, I switched my oven to convection bake and turned the temperature down to 455ºF.)

  14. Remove the loaves to a cooling rack, and cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

 

 

When tasted about 2 hours after baking, the crust was crunchy and the crumb was soft. The flavor was complex, with a caramelized nuttiness from the crust and a sweet, wheaty flavor from the crumb. There was some mild acidity but no discernible acetic acid tanginess. These are among the best-flavored sourdough baguettes I have ever tasted. Very yummy fresh baked and with great sandwich, crostini, toast and French toast potential.

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Simply perfect...directions, crust and crumb. I wish the fan on my Miele ovens could be turned off..alas...it runs even on conventional bake. I have continued to make only DO boules due to this. I think I may try the tiles in the roaster trick with a can of water. Short baguettes might fit as it is a huge roaster. Will have to post if I succeed. Will use your lovely formula. c

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

My oven is a gem, no question. We lucked out in choosing it.

I'm betting that you could bake fine baguettes in a large, covered oval roaster. FYI, mine are about 14 inches long. My only concern would be getting the crust crisp enough in that the high sides of the roaster might keep the imediate environment too humid during the second half of the bake. I wonder if you could transfer the loaves to a stone after the first 10 minutes in a covered roaster.

Happy baking! Do let us know how this works, if you try it.

David

etheil's picture
etheil

David,

Whoa...love that crust color; wish I could get that kind of color and finish from my gas oven. What model oven are you currently using? I'm considering switching to an electric oven and am looking for suggestions.

Thanks,

Eric

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

My oven is an electric KitchenAid convection oven. It is 17 years old, so I'm sure the model has been superceded by a newer version. I have no experience with gas ovens, but, from what I hear, they present quite a challenge to bread bakers because they don't hold steam as well due to their venting.

David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Mmmm.. i don't know why i haven't tried your SJSD yet, David.. i guess the idea of having to feed the starter with a specific flour mixture intimidates me, but it shouldn't.

Very inspiring, David.. thanks.

The crust , scoring , and crumb.. oh the crumb! all look perfect.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This is my standard starter feeding mix. It would be a bit of a hassle to construct it for every feeding. I keep a one liter jar full of this mix to use as needed. Generally, I mix 280g AP + 80g WW + 40g rye at a time. I use this for my stock, refrigerated starter too - 50g ripe levain + 100g water + 200g flour mix. It has become a routine.

I can't see you intimidated by this, Khalid. ;-)

David

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Mixed, shaped and baked to perfection, no doubt about it! Just look at that crust, those lightly charred spots on the ears and the wonderfully open crumb. If you ask me, baguette is the hardest thing to pull off successfully. And yours are spectacular.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You may have noted that I baked the baguettes at 480 dF, whereas I bake my SJSD bâtards at 460 dF. That was expressly to get this darker crust with a 20-22 minute bake. It makes for a crunchy crust with a much better flavor.

Thanks for your kind words.

David

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

From those pics and your description, would love to tear into one of those! I don't do baguettes, so will have to content myself with San Joaquin batards - but that ain't bad!

Cheers!
Ross

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Baguettes can be wonderful or awful. These are a crust lover's delight.

David

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Solid, proper Baguettes! You are a better man than I for waiting 2 hours to taste, I give myself 30 minutes tops!

Cheers,

Wingnut

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

isand66's picture
isand66

Those look beautiful and I can taste the nutty wheat flavor just from looking at them.  One question for you...what temperature is the water you are adding?  Are you using ice water or just room temperature?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Actually, I use filtered water from the fridge. I haven't actually measured its temperature, but now I'm curious.

David

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Ying a run for her money David!  When we make white bread we make San Joaquin or  your Pugliese.  Now we have to try it out as a baguette.  These are just beautiful in every way.

  Very nice baking indeed.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Superb, San Joaquin Baguettes!  They look very delicous.  Next go, save a pinch for a pizzett : ) 

Happy Easter,

Sylvia

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Funny you should mention "a pizzett." Up to the last minute, I went back and forth whether to make baguettes or pizzas with the dough. I even got out potato pizza recipes and bought the potatoes. 

David

isand66's picture
isand66

One more question...are you using your proofer for the bulk ferment before refrigerating and after taking it out to come to room temperature?  If so what temp. are you using?

You basic technique is very similar to what I use, but I only let the dough bulk ferment after the initial mix for about 2 hours.

Thanks.

Ian

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I bulk ferment at room temperature. The longer time helps flavor development, and the additional S&F's help strengthen the gluten. At least that's my reasoning.

I bulk ferment in a glass container, and I like to see the dough full of nice little gas bubbles before I refrigerate it. 

David

isand66's picture
isand66

That's what I was doing until I started using my proofer.  I am finding that the warmer proof at 80 degrees seems to add some additional volume to the dough but I have not tried one with and without yet to see the difference.

Thanks.
Ian

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Lovely, David!

-Floyd

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Actually, can I feature this on the home page for a bit?  It is definitely a keeper.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'd be honored to have it featured.

David

Alpana's picture
Alpana

These are everything I would want in a baguette. Great!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

chouette22's picture
chouette22

...you say, thus I definitely must make these. As a matter of fact, I was wondering today what to bake next, and not having terrible success on my baguette quest, I must try these. They look absolutely perfect!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The dough is rather sticky. Just keep your hands and the board lightly floured and use a light, quick touch when shaping. Don't forget to slash very shallowly for the best results. 

Let us know how your baguettes turn out.

Happy baking!

David

M2's picture
M2

I remember Mark (Sinclair's Bakery) said that he measures the water temperature in order to get to the desired number.  I can't remember what is the temperature he is aiming, but it seems it does contribute to the dough development. 

Always enjoy reading your post, David.  The colour, the crumb and scoring are superb!  Did you use regular flour or bread flour?  The flour I use is advertised as unbleached white with 14% protein.  However, I learned from the TFL that it is better to use lower protein flour for baguette.

Michelle

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

To achieve a standardized, predictible production schedule, dough temprature precision is important. For the SJSD, a long, cool fermentation gives the best flavor, so I use cool water and mix by hand.

I use an AP flour with 11.5% protein. Your flour would qualify as "high-gluten" and is suitable for bagels, high percentage rye breads and highly enriched breads. You would get a chewy but not a crisp crust on baguettes made with your flour.

David

M2's picture
M2

I always use water at room temperature (between 63-67F), so I guess it is considered consistent from a home baker perspective :)

Thanks for the tip.  What I have been struggling with is the open crumb.  I have no problem achieving crispy crust but the crumb isn't open enough.  I think my shaping and scoring techniques are ok, so I thought  maybe it has something to do with the flour.

Michelle

 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

David:

You are the (baguette) man!

Yippee

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

So nice to hear from you.

David

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Impressive David! Those are beautiful baugettes. I can literally taste them through the screen - well not really but it was worth a try.  Anis has got to be taking lessons...,

Wild-Yeast

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

embth's picture
embth

Certainly I will try making baguettes again, but sandwich loaves baked in pans with oatmeal, buttermilk, and other embellishments to hide in are looking mighty good.

I must have overproofed this dough because there was no "oven spring" at all.  The dough was very sticky.  The flavor of the crumb in the flat little loaves was not bad at all.....but the crust texture was almost leathery.   

My plan is to step back to a yeasted, simpler baguette and build a bit of confidence before tackling this wonderful sourdough baguette.

Thank you for posting the recipe.    embth

 

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm sorry you experienced frustration with this recipe. Baguettes are a challenge, and this dough is sticky. It is really important to achieve good gluten development with the stretch and folds during bulk fermentation and to shape quickly and gently but firmly.

I think your plan to work on your technique with "simpler baguettes" is a good one, but I hope you come back to this recipe once you are ready. It really makes good baguettes.

David

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I made your SJSD several times, in different versions, always very happy with the results. Now you present a baguette version, and such a stunning one. Obviously another must-bake!

Karin

 

kevinnoe's picture
kevinnoe

These are JUST GORGEOUS!

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I don't believe I've every been asked that particular questions before.

Hmmmm ... Well, the San Joaquin Sourdough baguette is probably not the best first sourdough, unless you already have experience with 1) baguette shaping and 2) sticky doughs. If so, have at it. Otherwise, a lower hydration bread in an easier shape - boule, bâtard or pan loaf would be easier. Of my own breads, I would recommend the San Francisco-style Sourdough as a pretty easy and straight-forward first sourdough. I do mix it with a stand mixer. If you don't have one, you could certainly make it with hand-mixing and stretch and folds. 

See My San Francisco Sourdough Quest, Take 4 for the formula.

Good luck! Let us know how it turns out.

David

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

I got a chance to make this recipe last week, and it makes a really good-tasting loaf. I made it up on Wednesday hoping to bake on Thursday, but that slipped to Friday, and ... I finally baked on Sunday. So the dough got a four-day refrigerated ferment. Whether that hindered or improved the taste, I can't say.

My daughter, just back from a year in France and a fan of good bread, actually complimented me on the taste. So I got that going for me... :^)

Oh, and I only made a half-recipe. That worked fine. I was really patient with the dough after removing it from the fridge, and let it sit on the counter in my cool house (68-70 dF) for a good long time -- probably 2-3 hours. I've found if I allow plenty of time to allow refrigerated dough to come up to temperature, I get better loaves.

Anyway, thanks for the formula, David!

jaywillie

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

WHAT TYPE OVEN DO YOU USE FOR YOUR BAKING?  --- I HAVE RECENTLY PURCHASED A VOLLRATH CAYENNE OVEN --- I NEED SOME ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING WORK BEFORE IT WILL BECOME USABLE --- IT IS CAPABLE OF 570 F AND HAS A MANUAL STEAM INJECTION CAPABILITY AND A FAIRLY LARGE CAPACITY --- DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABUT THIS OVEN? --- I AM LOOKING TO MAKING YOUR BAGUETTES AND MANY OTHER RECIPES --- THANKS FOR YOUR HELP --

 

SLKIRK

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

WHAT TYPE OVEN DO YOU USE FOR YOUR BAKING?  --- I HAVE RECENTLY PURCHASED A VOLLRATH CAYENNE OVEN --- I NEED SOME ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING WORK BEFORE IT WILL BECOME USABLE --- IT IS CAPABLE OF 570 F AND HAS A MANUAL STEAM INJECTION CAPABILITY AND A FAIRLY LARGE CAPACITY --- DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABUT THIS OVEN? --- I AM LOOKING TO MAKING YOUR BAGUETTES AND MANY OTHER RECIPES --- THANKS FOR YOUR HELP --

 

SLKIRK

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

My oven is nowhere near as fancy as the one you are buying! I know nothing about it. Mine is an in-wall KitchenAid convection oven.

When you get your oven going, please let us know how you like it.

BTW, writing messages using all capital letters in online messages is called "shouting." It is used for single words or very brief phrases occasionally for emphasis. Otherwise, it is regarded as rude. Please find the Caps Lock key on your computer keyboard, and turn it OFF.

Thanks.

David

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

DAVID,

I HAVE HEARD THE RULES ABOUT CAPS BEING SHOUTING ---- I KNOW WHERE THE CAPS KEY IS --- I HAVE NO INTENTION TO BE SHOUTING --- I LIKE READING ALL CAPS AND WILL CONTINUE TO USE THEM --- NO DISRESPECT INTENDED --- I HOPE YOU WILL UNDERSTAND MY CHOICES --- I HOPE YOU WILL CONTINUE TO RESPOND TO MY QUESTIONS AS I RESPECT YOU AND HAVE FOUND YOU RECIPES AND SUGGESTIONS VERY HELPFUL --- I USED THE OVEN FOR THE FIRST TIME TODAY AND SO FAR I AM VERY HAPPY WITH IT --- IT HAS A MANUAL STEAM INJECTION BUTTON --- PUSH BUTTON AND YOU GET STEAM ---- THERE ARE ALMOST NO INSTRUCTIONS WITH THE OVEN AND SO I DO NOT KNOW HOW MANY TIMES TO PUSH  ---THE BUTTON (SUGGESTED TIME IS 2 SEC. PER PUSH) --- I AM LOOKING FORWARD TO MAKING THESE BAGUETTES IN IT SOON ---

 

TONYK

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

DAVID,

I RECENTLY MADE THESE BAGUETTES AND GOT RAVE REVIEWS FROM FAMILY AND FRIENDS --- I RECENTLY GOT A VOLLRATH CONVECTION STEAM OVEN AND REALLY LIKE IT SO FAR --- IN THE ABOVE YOU CALL FOR TEM MINUTES OF STEAM --- AS MY OVEN IS A MANUAL STEAM TYPE --- HOW WOULD I USE THE CORRECT AMOUNT OF STEAM TO MATCH YOUR TIMING --- THE RECOMMENDED STEAM INJECTION IS A TWO SEC. BURST PER SHOT ---- HOW OFTEN AND FOR HOW LONG --- I KNOW I WILL HAVE TO EXPERIMENT BUT COULD YOU SUGGEST A STARTING POINT --- AS ALWAYS, THANKS YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP ---

 

SKLIRK

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

you will have to experiment, but the manufacturor's recommendation is certainly the best place to start, imo.

alfanso's picture
alfanso

Forgot to press the start button on my timer for the post-steam part of the bake, so they are a half shade darker than intended.  Still have some work to do on improvements.  One step at a time.  But I am pretty happy with the results.

Thanks for the inspiration...

Alan

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for letting me know how they turned out.

How was the crumb? What did you think of the flavor?

David

alfanso's picture
alfanso

A bit disappointed that the crumb on the portion that I cut into wasn't a little more open.  I pre-shaped and rolled these a little tighter than my typical, so I wonder if that had an effect.  My kitchen is running about 77-78 this time of year (So. FL so what does one expect!), so what I proof tends to prove a little faster than, for example, in Portland.

The flavor was delicious, quite delicate.  My wife is more a fan of the sweet baguette flavor, more along the lines of the Bouabsa taste, so I'll have to alternate bakes.  Gee, what a penalty to have to endure!

alan

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