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San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

April 1, 2013

My San Joaquin Sourdough originated in Anis Bouabsa's baguettes which had won the prize for the best baguette in Paris in 2008. Bouabsa's baguettes departed from convention in utilizing a 21 hour retardation after bulk fermentation and before dividing and shaping. Jane Stewart (Janedo on TFL) and I initially modified Bouabsa's formula by adding a bit of rye flour and some sourdough starter for flavor. I then omitted the commercial yeast altogether and began using the modified formula to shape as bâtards. Over time, I have tweaked the formula and method in various ways, but have settled on the current one as providing the best product.

Today's bake takes the San Joaquin Sourdough back to its roots, so to speak. I used my current formula and method to make San Joaquin Sourdough baguettes. I am very happy with the results.

 

Total ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

479

89

WW Flour

33

6

Medium rye Flour

29

5

Water

392

72

Salt

10

1.8

Liquid starter

17

3

Total

960

176.8

9.2% of the flour is pre-fermented

Liquid Levain ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

29

70

WW Flour

8

20

Medium rye Flour

4

10

Water

42

100

Liquid starter

17

40

Total

100

240

 

Final dough ingredients

Wt (g)

AP Flour

450

WW Flour

25

Medium rye Flour

25

Water

350

Salt

10

Liquid levain

100

Total

960

 

Method

  1. Mix the levain by dissolving the liquid starter in the water, then add the flours and mix well. Ferment at room temperature, covered tightly, until the surface is bubbly and wrinkled. (8-12 hours)

  2. Dissolve the levain in the water, add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.

  3. Add the salt and mix to incorporate.

  4. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly.

  5. Bulk ferment for 3-4 hours with stretch and folds in the bowl every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours, then a stretch and fold on the board after 2.5 hours. The dough should have expanded by about 50% and be full of small bubbles.

  6. Refrigerate the dough for 18-24 hours.

  7. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and transfer it to a lightly floured board.

  8. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces and pre-shape as logs or round.

  9. Cover the pieces and allow them to rest for 60 minutes.

  10. Shape as baguettes and proof for 45 minutes, covered.

  11. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

  12. Transfer the baguettes to your peel. Turn down the oven to 480ºF. Score the loaves and load them onto your baking stone.

  13. Bake with steam for 10 minutes, then remove your steaming apparatus and continue to bake for another 10-12 minutes. (Note: After 10 minutes, I switched my oven to convection bake and turned the temperature down to 455ºF.)

  14. Remove the loaves to a cooling rack, and cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

 

 

When tasted about 2 hours after baking, the crust was crunchy and the crumb was soft. The flavor was complex, with a caramelized nuttiness from the crust and a sweet, wheaty flavor from the crumb. There was some mild acidity but no discernible acetic acid tanginess. These are among the best-flavored sourdough baguettes I have ever tasted. Very yummy fresh baked and with great sandwich, crostini, toast and French toast potential.

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

My oven is nowhere near as fancy as the one you are buying! I know nothing about it. Mine is an in-wall KitchenAid convection oven.

When you get your oven going, please let us know how you like it.

BTW, writing messages using all capital letters in online messages is called "shouting." It is used for single words or very brief phrases occasionally for emphasis. Otherwise, it is regarded as rude. Please find the Caps Lock key on your computer keyboard, and turn it OFF.

Thanks.

David

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

DAVID,

I HAVE HEARD THE RULES ABOUT CAPS BEING SHOUTING ---- I KNOW WHERE THE CAPS KEY IS --- I HAVE NO INTENTION TO BE SHOUTING --- I LIKE READING ALL CAPS AND WILL CONTINUE TO USE THEM --- NO DISRESPECT INTENDED --- I HOPE YOU WILL UNDERSTAND MY CHOICES --- I HOPE YOU WILL CONTINUE TO RESPOND TO MY QUESTIONS AS I RESPECT YOU AND HAVE FOUND YOU RECIPES AND SUGGESTIONS VERY HELPFUL --- I USED THE OVEN FOR THE FIRST TIME TODAY AND SO FAR I AM VERY HAPPY WITH IT --- IT HAS A MANUAL STEAM INJECTION BUTTON --- PUSH BUTTON AND YOU GET STEAM ---- THERE ARE ALMOST NO INSTRUCTIONS WITH THE OVEN AND SO I DO NOT KNOW HOW MANY TIMES TO PUSH  ---THE BUTTON (SUGGESTED TIME IS 2 SEC. PER PUSH) --- I AM LOOKING FORWARD TO MAKING THESE BAGUETTES IN IT SOON ---

 

TONYK

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

DAVID,

I RECENTLY MADE THESE BAGUETTES AND GOT RAVE REVIEWS FROM FAMILY AND FRIENDS --- I RECENTLY GOT A VOLLRATH CONVECTION STEAM OVEN AND REALLY LIKE IT SO FAR --- IN THE ABOVE YOU CALL FOR TEM MINUTES OF STEAM --- AS MY OVEN IS A MANUAL STEAM TYPE --- HOW WOULD I USE THE CORRECT AMOUNT OF STEAM TO MATCH YOUR TIMING --- THE RECOMMENDED STEAM INJECTION IS A TWO SEC. BURST PER SHOT ---- HOW OFTEN AND FOR HOW LONG --- I KNOW I WILL HAVE TO EXPERIMENT BUT COULD YOU SUGGEST A STARTING POINT --- AS ALWAYS, THANKS YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP ---

 

SKLIRK

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

you will have to experiment, but the manufacturor's recommendation is certainly the best place to start, imo.

alfanso's picture
alfanso

Forgot to press the start button on my timer for the post-steam part of the bake, so they are a half shade darker than intended.  Still have some work to do on improvements.  One step at a time.  But I am pretty happy with the results.

Thanks for the inspiration...

Alan

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for letting me know how they turned out.

How was the crumb? What did you think of the flavor?

David

alfanso's picture
alfanso

A bit disappointed that the crumb on the portion that I cut into wasn't a little more open.  I pre-shaped and rolled these a little tighter than my typical, so I wonder if that had an effect.  My kitchen is running about 77-78 this time of year (So. FL so what does one expect!), so what I proof tends to prove a little faster than, for example, in Portland.

The flavor was delicious, quite delicate.  My wife is more a fan of the sweet baguette flavor, more along the lines of the Bouabsa taste, so I'll have to alternate bakes.  Gee, what a penalty to have to endure!

alan

alfanso's picture
alfanso

A little over dramatic on my response to the crumb.  It is fine, as you can see.  It's just that my expectations are always high, thanks to me and you-know-who.  Keeps me striving...

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I think that's a pretty nice crumb. You know, how vigorously to degas and how tightly to shape varies from bread to bread.  Maybe from batch of dough to batch of dough.

My SJSD baguette crumb has become increasing open over time. This was certainly not a conscious, planned modification of technique. It just happened unconsciously.  I imagine this is a common experience among bakers.

David

alfanso's picture
alfanso

hummed to the tune of "It's Getting Better All The Time".  I like to work something until I can be consistent bake after bake.  I'm discussing this affliction with my shrink ;-) .  I figure that I'll be ready to move on by 2016 or so...

This time I decided to go back to a three baguette bake instead of the four demi-baguettes, although the formula and TDW remained the same.  I also adhered to dabrownman's dictum of placing water for steam into my lava rock pan when the oven is first turned on so that the oven is already steamed by the time the baking surface has heated up (~45 minutes).  I follow that by pouring very hot water into the pan just after loading the baguettes.

Although my levain starter is mature at this point, it still doesn't display the tang notes that I am after.  It is still too "soft" although it is certainly potent enough to provide an appropriate rise and prove.  I queried dbm on his 3 stage build, and he provided a beautiful detailed report on his philosophy and methodology, which I plan on employing the next time that I refresh my starter.  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/287377#comment-287377

I love the results of this bake although I'd like the crumb to be more open (familiar cry?).  I'm trying to find the right balance between a tight baguette with sufficient surface tension vs. a softer touch where the scoring seems to be poorer but the crumb is perhaps a tad more open.  The journey continues...

alan

breadesky's picture
breadesky

Next time you bake can you show what the dough looks like before you bake. I seem to have smaller sizes but similar crumbs. 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I can certainly (try to remember to) take a photo before loading the loaves in the oven, but I am quite confused about what information you are seeking. Can you explain?

Regarding size: My baguettes are generally around 240g prior to baking. They are shaped to about 14-15 inches long.

David

breadesky's picture
breadesky

I'm making mine closer to 100g. I need to bring up the size so they come out wider. Mine are also 14-15 inches long. I'm getting decent oven spring as well. 

recent bread

alfanso's picture
alfanso

breadesky,

I found these in my collection.  I will make the assumption that you are looking for something like this:

 1. preshaped

2. couched 

3. hand peeled ad ready to score 

4. scored with a razor blade lame 

5. as posted in early March, the finished product

alan

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Terrific scoring!

The crumb is showing progress, I think. Most would be very happy with it as is, you know.

David

Brokeback Cowboy's picture
Brokeback Cowboy

Thank you David for this well composed and thorough recipe. It has been so long since I've tasted a baguette like this. After leaving Toronto to move back to rural Ontario the quality breads I'd come accustomed to in my student days have long surpassed near memory.The texture, aroma, appearance and philosophy of baking. Well done, a thorough piece.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

alfanso's picture
alfanso

Hi breadesky,

When you say smaller sizes, do you mean that your baguettes are smaller?  I vary my bag bakes between 3 or 4 bags with the same amount of total dough.  The length of my bags is generally about 14"- 15" due to the limitations of my oven depth and the baking deck.  The girth of them is dependent on whether I get 3 or 4 out of a bake as well as the consistency of the oven spring.

Being a relatively new home baker I would venture that the crumb should be consistent in the openness regardless of the baguette size.

I will try to remember, but it may also be good to get the input of the OP as well.

breadesky's picture
breadesky

Thank you for posting the photos from shape through bake. That helps in understanding the sizes and expected spring I should be getting. I'm also not cutting as deep, so I need to improve that. 

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