The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Flipping Board (Transfer Peel) Demonstration

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Flipping Board (Transfer Peel) Demonstration

I have made a video demonstrating how to use a flipping board.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caAif4A03Jk

Enjoy! David

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Nice!

(I updated your post to include the embed code.  I'm actually looking into how to make that easier to do this weekend on another site I'm working on, so if I figure out a good solution here, I'll let you know!)

-Floyd

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I really would like to know how to embed videos. If you have time, point me at instructional materials.

If it were easy to do it, and I didn't have to weigh bothering you, I'd probably do more videos. ... Now, that's not meant as a threat. ;-)

David

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

Hi David,

Believe it or not I signed into TFL today with the firm intention of asking you to consider doing a video on slashing technique.  And to my great surprise, here was this lovely video on the use of a flipping board! So I guess you're primed now for me to ask you -- since most everyone here, I think, would consider your slashing techniques to be among the best, would you consider doing a tutorial video on that subject?

Barbara

EvaB's picture
EvaB

video and now I know how to do an esoteric bread thing! Now all I need is the lovely case of bordeaux that comes in a wooden crate, around here they all come in cardboard boxes not quite the same thing! However I do keep all and any lovely slats of wood I come across (that inherited dirty thirties syndrome) so I may find something if I look hard enough in the many and varied spots that such things are saved. By the way loved the bread with the interesting markings on! LOL

DH and I are going to try the challah loaf from ITJB tomorrow, which will be fun, we were going to do it tonight but the dishes got in the way and by the time we had washed and dried all of them (left over from Xmas and New Years due to very low water in the tank and waiting for them to catch up with deliveries) and had a few rum and cokes, and rye and ginger ales ( a rare occasion around here) we decided that the morning would be better to attempt such a difficult thing, besides it would give us better time. It was too close to 9 to start such a drawn out affair.

We shall see how it goes and post some pictures. DH thinks it will be fun! I am reserving judgement, since I have never found making bread that much fun, or at least not more than once or twice since it usually turns out terrible for me.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi David,

I think Floyd should place these fine loaves of yours on the Home page for awhile :-)  Such beauties and I especially like the melodic name.  I was hoping for a crumb shot, but alas, the video ended before these were even baked.....

More seriously.  This is a great video and goes so well with your last tutorial.  Such a wealth of knowledge and to see it done really makes a big difference.   I have yet to try this technique because any loaf over 6" long that looks like a baguette still scares me so I steer clear and stick to batards, boules and rolls.

Janet

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The closest you're gonna get to a crumb shot is the frayed edges of my couche fabric.

We enjoyed both loaves for dinner tonight .... Well, truthfully, it was after dinner ... drying the dishes.

On a more serious note, having a flipping board takes away one of the scariest parts of making baguettes, which is moving them around. Now that you have seen it in action, you should appreciate how easy it is to use. So, start with 6 inches and build up to 14, 18 ... 36, ... 

David

proth5's picture
proth5

Good video.  And it's true - use of a transfer peel takes a lot of mystery out of loading long breads of all types.

I've been taught to always use the short end of the couche to manipulate the loaves and to keep the transfer peel between the loaf that is being transferred.  So you would unroll the short part of the couche - place the flipping board between the loaf to be transferrred and the next loaf in line, flip the loaf over towards the short end of the couch and use the short end of the couche to roll the loaf on the transfer peel.

Not as dramatic as your method, but if you have a couche loaded with a dozen or so loaves (or having a voice in your head saying"And just HOW did I tell you to do this, Pat?" - a problem that not everyone has to be sure...) a bit more practical, perhaps.

Anyway, I'm wondering about that Super Peel.  I'm sure that you like it or you wouldn't use it, but can you give me some pros and cons.  I have decided to keep my home oven cleaner by not using semolina on my peel, but experience great unhappiness with using pachment paper.  Was wonder how the Super Peel does for you...

Thanks

Pat

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Re. which end of the couche to grasp: Your point is well-taken. In the bakery, of course, the couche is likely full and covered with plastic, so it's not an issue. Being right-handed, I just got in the habit of holding the transfer peel in my right hand and flipping the couche with my left. The solution, of course, is to place my 2 to 3 loaves at the left end of the couche. I'll try that.

Re. The Super Peel: With the optional extension, it holds 3 or 4 baguettes as long as my baking stone will accommodate. The mechanism is similar to that of a loader, which I really got to like at the SFBI. (Preaching to the choir, eh?) I also like being able to load all my loaves in one swell foop.  With my smaller wooden peel, I could only load one boule or bâtard at a time and found the first-loaded loaf always baked darker than the last and had better oven spring. With the Super Peel, all the loaves bake the same. The alternative would be to buy a wider wooden peel, but I don't really want a fourth peel right now. When making pizzas, I load with the Super Peel but still un-load with a large aluminum peel.  Even with the Super Peel, I sometimes use semolina for stickier doughs and sometimes parchment for pizzas. I like the Super Peel a lot.

David

proth5's picture
proth5

Yes, I do love me a loader (but not as much as a sheeter).  I've been practicing with larger volumes of loaves so the short end manuver really counts - and I must do as told because there is some troubles I just don't invite.

I've been thinking about the Super Peel.   I will probably begin thinking harder about it.

 

Thanks again.

isand66's picture
isand66

Let me know if you really want one.  I got one as  gift and I don't really like it.  If you want I would sell it to you for a good price.

Just send me a message at isand66

thanks.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Shocked I tell you, what with the Oscar nominations coming out yesterday that David's name was not listed listed under the Tutorial Documentary Category - 'Flipping Off One to Another and Another.'  Shame on the Actors Guild for this obvious slight.

I'm with Barbara and would love to see a slashing video that the Guild could slight you for ...again ......this time in the Horror Film Category!  You could call it 'Slash That Bag, Again and Again and Again and Again and Again' :-)  I know that I  would watch it more than once and many other Fresh Lofians might want to as well!

Film On David!

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for the compliment. I am embarrassed to reveal I let my Screen Actors Guild membership lapse. They are so picky!

Re. A scoring video: What's missing from the Scoring Tutorial you would like to see?

David

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

The scoring tutorial is great, David. A picture is worth a thousand words, but a video even more.  I'd like to see you in action. I think it would bve very helpful.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Even though it is a simple thing I learned French folding techniques from bwraith's 2 videos and French slap and fold from another done by a lady I can't remember.    I think a scoring video would be handy as well for so many on TFL.   Seeing is so much easier to lean from as you found out at SFBI right?

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

For the scoring demonstration, use real bread. Be a shame to cut up dish towels.

And let me be the first to call it a Slasher Film.

Glenn

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

That makes a hard-to-describe maneuver very easy to understand.  

Your next challenge will be to post the formula for those rustic loaves.

Paul

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The formula for the asciugamani is very simple - only 3 ingredients: Dish towels (well aged), masking tape and a marking pen.

David

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

That has gotta be the best flipping video I ever saw!

Glenn