The Fresh Loaf

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Formula Development IV - You only try twice

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proth5's picture
proth5

Formula Development IV - You only try twice

It's a slow, agonizing sort of thing that I do.  (Especially being able to bake only once a week.  Hey, King Arthur Flour - if you need a full time high altitude test baker - call me!)  I would like to have the genius to throw many things in the bowl of My Preciousss confident that it will be good bread, but that is not me.  It never has been and I strongly suspect that it never will.  Even if the bread was delicious, I would pound myself with "what if I had done X or Y - would it be better?" No, better to stay single factor.


But I am nothing if not market driven (even overcoming my aversion to all acts photographic to post pictures of what I feel is much better described as "brown loaf - fine crumb") and so allowed myself to be influenced by cries for "More triticale, please!"


So I increased the percentage of tritcale to 20% of the total flour in a firm pre ferment. 


It was very informative. (That's never good...)


One thing to realize is like its cousin rye, triticale absorbs a lot of water.  Removing enough water  from that used to soak the oats to make a 60% hydration pre ferment with the triticale left me with an oat mixture that was wet enough to soak the oats, but not enough (even when the pre ferment was added) to create bread dough.


Did I achieve the elusive "hydration neutral?"  Hardly.  Once again there was no visible water, but the oatmeal mixture definitely gave up some moisture into the dough.  Ah yes, just what I needed - another ideal to struggle with! I'll have to tell the doctors at "The Place" about this...


 I had to add a full 8oz of water (in 2 oz increments) to get a somewhat tacky dough and I did need to mix for 8 minutes for the thing to come together.


The next thing that occurred is the dough still rose like gangbusters.  I spend time mulling over that I now have a dough that is weighted down with oatmeal and grain that has a reputation as one that won't support good rise in bread (I read that 50% triticale is an absolute upper limit) and it still rises like gangbusters.  I feel strongly that this will result in another ill conceived experiment with 100% triticale bread where I pre ferment a very high portion of the flour and bake it in a pan, but for now I must focus


In fact, there was some degradation in the quality of the crumb.  It was light and airy, but sliced thinly tore apart when buttered (unless toasted - it is delicious toasted).  And it was delicious, but not much more delicious than 10% which had a better crumb and nicer dough handling qualities.   Picture below - note the somewhat less sturdy crumb (if you can.)


So, another slow step forward only to decide that this time I went too far.


The bread wasn't bad, and to keep a complete log, I am presenting the formula in spite of its flaws.  But now I am going to stop a bit and remember what I was trying to accomplish: Take a simply made sandwich loaf (and there seem to be a lot of very small variants on the "oatmeal bread" in the baking literature), use some of the newer techniques to make it better, and use ingredients that might be more local to the Mountain West.   I have to lie to myself pretty much to claim that things like oats and triticale "could" be local.  Certainly they have wider growing ranges than the very fine, fine wheat that we produce on our high plains, but they are more adapted to cool, wet climates.  But oats are part of the original formula, triticale is my favorite, and there are times when my capacity for self deception is high. 


The formula:


Total Dough Wt

 

68.958

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.2

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

%

Wt

UOM

%

WT

UOM

Ingredients

Wt

UOM

Total Flour

1

27

oz

1

5.4

oz

Total Flour

21.6

oz

KA AP Flour

0.8

24.3

oz

 

 

 

KA AP Flour

24.3

oz

Triticale Flour

0.2

2.7

 

1

5.4

oz

 

 

 

Water

0.42

11.34

 

0.6

3.24

oz

Water

8.1

 

Rolled Oats

0.17

4.59

oz

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

4.59

oz

Steel Cut Oats

0.11

2.97

oz

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

2.97

oz

Boiling water

0.62

16.74

oz

 

 

 

Boiling water

16.74

oz

Shortening(leaf lard)

0.04

1.08

oz

 

 

 

Shortening(leaf lard)

1.08

oz

Molasses

0.112

3.024

oz

 

 

 

Molasses

3.024

oz

Milk Powder

0.04

1.08

oz

 

 

 

Milk Powder

1.08

oz

Salt

0.028

0.756

oz

 

 

 

Salt

0.756

oz

Yeast

0.006

0.162

oz

 

 

 

Yeast

0.162

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed

0.008

0.216

oz

0.04

0.216

oz

Levain

8.856

oz

Totals

2.554

68.958

oz

1.64

8.856

oz

 

71.658

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combine the two types of oats, boiling water, milk powder and shortening.  Allow to cool to lukewarm. 

Add the salt, molasses, yeast, levain, and flour.  Mix 8 minutes on the single speed of the spiral mixer. Or use your preferred method of mixing.

Let rise until doubled - 2 hours at 78-80F.  Fold.  Let rise again - about 2 hours 78-80F.  (Note the change - it was too cold in my house to use cool room temperature)

Shape and place in greased pans.  Proof (1 hour) and bake at 375F for 40 minutes.  Remove from pans and cool on a rack

And the picture (of a brown loaf with a fine crumb...)

 Brown Loaf - fine crumb

But there are other ingredients to tweak (and using honey is just too obvious - or is it?) and the troublesome matter of "inclusions."  While not wanting to make a seedy, nutty bread (I actually have, as one of my 2011 formula goals such a thing, but not in this style) I ponder what might make a not too crunchy set of inclusions for a good "sammich" loaf.  I shall continue to ponder until I nail down next week's formula.

Comments

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you for posting your triticale adventure.  Another grain I have yet to try, but now feel somehow compelled to use if I can find it.  That's why I come here.


Marcus

proth5's picture
proth5

I'm going to work on a high triticale loaf as a separate adventure - but these things do take time....

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

is high. I'm whisker over 6000'. Are you higher than I am? (No pun)


By the way, your dated posts on grinding and sifting fresh ground flour have been invaluable to me. Thanks


Michael

proth5's picture
proth5

at almost exactly a mile high.  I am close enough to the famous marker that I'm pretty sure about that. 


Thanks for reading my old posts - I still do grind and sift a whole wheat flour that way.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Can't help it.  I automatically look to the right hand column for the percentages.


Discombobulating.


Given your comment about the weak crumb, what about using KA Sir Lancelot in place of the AP? 


Mr. Hamelman recommends high-gluten for his oatmeal bread.  Makes for a nice soft crumb.  I have lots of Sir Lance around.  Maybe I should substitute tritcale for the WW next time (if I can find it).

proth5's picture
proth5

when these up and coming bakers write their books - they'll all use this notation.  Might as well get used to it. 


Actually when I bake - especially if I'm doing a number of different breads, I have a spreadsheet that transposes the BBGA format into a large type worksheet without the percantages so I can just scale and go.  It will also be helpful when I figure out how to get grid lines to post in the blog - I can get them in my document, but not in the blog entry.


My original formula dates from a time when these higher gluten flours were not commonly available to the home baker and I did figure that just by switching from Gold Medal (as was called out by the orginal) to KA, I was upping the gluten somewhat.  But 20% of triticale did not improve the taste that much - so I'm headed back to 10% on my next variation.  However, it is a good thought to use a higher gluten flour and I may give that a try.  I also wonder if I've gotten just a little too "long slow fermentation" on the whole thing because the original had no problem with weak crumb.  I'll need to study Mr Hamelman's formula a bit to look at yeast percentages (which doesn't always apply to my breads because I do bake at what is considered high altitude...)


I haven't found triticale flour anywhere. Have to grind my own.


We shall see...

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

Challenging!


Pam