The Fresh Loaf

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Polenta Pepita Sourdough

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limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Polenta Pepita Sourdough

Hi all back to posting after a long hiatus. Inspired by the numerous Tartine 3 breads that have been popping up over thefreshloaf and reminded by a post that is filed under my to-bake list, I decided to make a Polenta Pepita Sourdough over the weekend. 

I mainly followed the Marcus's recipe here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/34729/polenta-pepita-sourdough but instead of soaking in boiling water, I cooked up a batch of polenta by stirring it over the stovetop over low heat. Here's my take on it:

Sourdough

Metric

1 kg

Bread Flour

180

92.78

Water

125

64.43

Mature sourdough culture

35

18.04

Total

340

175.26

Cooked Polenta

 

 

Polenta

40

20.62

Water

160

82.47

Total

200

103.09

Final dough

 

 

Bread Flour

660

340.21

Whole Wheat Flour (15%)

150

77.32

Water

520

268.04

Salt (2%)

20

10.31

Cooked Polenta (15%)

150

77.32

Sunflower Seeds (10%)

100

51.55

Sourdough

340

175.26

Total

1940

1000

Mix all and autolyse for 20 minutes. 
Bulk ferment for 3 hours with 4 S&F at 20 minutes interval.
Proof for 1.5 hours and bake at 230C for 40 minutes.

I think the difference between the two approaches show in the final result. The cooked polenta totally disappeared into the crumb resulting in a softer texture bread but no noticeable specks of polenta. My bread's crumb turned out slightly off yellow rather than the yellow in Marcus's picture. There is no gritty bite of the polenta too.

But otherwise the texture was good with a nice slight chew and sweetness probably from the cooked grains. Next time, I will further bump up the polenta to 20% and try the soaking method instead. Now off to trying other porridge breads!

-Tim

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Looks great, Tim!  Would you mind if I featured it for a bit?

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Hi Floydm, nice to hear from you. Most certainly, I would be honoured!

cerevisiae's picture
cerevisiae

Where it says "mature sourdough culture", what hydration percentage should it be?

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

I use a 100% hydration sourdough but you can just stick with the hydration you prefer and adjust it afterwards. Should not make too much a difference since it is very little as compared to the overall amount of water used in the recipe.

cerevisiae's picture
cerevisiae

I figured it probably wouldn't matter too much, but since I actually have the chance to ask, unlike with a recipe in a book, I thought I might as well. :)

ghazi's picture
ghazi

Looks delicious, just got a bag of polenta which im going to use in some bread. Great job!

 

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Thanks, do try it out!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

fine bread.  Well done and happy baking.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

unknown.  Sorry about that.  What I was saying is A nice bake of this fine bread.  Well done and happy baking.

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Thank you and happy baking to you too!

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Looks great!  I've never tried really cooking the polenta but it looks like it worked well.  I'll have to give that a go next time.

Marcus

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Thanks for the great combination recommendation. Next time I will just try soaking it to have a little more bite.

emkay's picture
emkay

It's nice to see the contrast between your (boiled) polenta bread and Marcus' (soaked) polenta bread. I have put both on my to-do bake list and I'm curious to see which one my family prefers.

:) Mary

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

I think the soaked version will give a more gritty bite to the bread like an anadama bread feel but the soaked one totally "disappeared" into the crumb. Maybe increasing the percentage will make it more prominent. 

isand66's picture
isand66

Beautiful looking bake.  I've made some breads in the past using cooked polenta with cheese and really liked the way it came out.  Will be interested to see how your soaked version compares.

Ian

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Thanks Ian. Yes, I was thinking of throwing other ingredients into the cooking pot but held back this time. Maybe not the next! It should be a good way to layer more flavours into the bread.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

we actually mean water and cornmeal ?  Months ago, I bought this bag of Harina de Maiz for a special recipe which, by the time I brought it home, totally escaped me.  So I have been looking at the bag ever since.  Your bread looks so so good, it would be a wonderful change from my everyday German farmer bread. 

Thanks much  !!

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Hi Anna, yes they are similar. I think when you cook the cornmeal it becomes polenta. Hope that helps. Give it a try!