The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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mse1152's picture
mse1152

Hello,

There are a few of us living in San Diego. Susan (of upside down Pyrex bowl cloche fame) and I (of no particular fame that we can talk about here) have gotten together a couple of times. Last week, we did a field trip to a place called Lakeside Poultry that no longer sells poultry (???), but does sell restaurant supplies, including 50 pound bags of flour. Susan bought a bag of Gold Medal Harvest King, and I bought a bag of Eagle Mills organic bread flour (from ConAgra, not exactly your old time mill).

I have been using Bob's Red Mill flours for years, so I decided to do a side-by-side bakeoff, making one loaf of sourdough from Bob's (BRM) and one from the new Eagle Mills (EM) flour. BRM is organic unbleached flour with a protein percentage of 11.75. The EM flour has 11 percent. Neither is malted. I used the recipe I've posted earlier here, except I used all unbleached flour in the sponges. I started a sponge for each batch of dough with one teaspoon of my 100% hydration white starter, created from the BRM flour. Due to yet another brain lapse, I neglected to photograph the sponges. For the record, BRM looked a bit more robust, thicker, but both had very good bubble populations. Here are pics of the two doughs just after the initial mix (BRM is on the left):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I did four stretch and folds, with 45 minutes between each (and before the first one), for a total fermentation time of about four hours. Both doughs were a bit tacky, and the EM dough rose a little more throughout than the BRM. After the fourth S&F, the dough rested for about 25 minutes before shaping. The BRM dough looked and felt smoother after shaping, as seen here (BRM on the left):

 

The loaves rested 30 minutes after shaping, then went into the oven at 425F (convection). I poured boiling water into a cast iron pan at (well, almost) the same time. I wasn't happy with the look or feel of the BRM loaf; it didn't take the scoring well, and the knife just dragged through the dough. It was also flatter looking than the EM. But the oven spring fairies were on duty! Here's the BRM loaf:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the EM loaf:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I haven't used that center slash before, and I think I like it better than 2 or 3 diagonal ones. Both loaves had very good oven spring and color. They had decently open crumb for a 65% hydration bread.

Here's the BRM crumb:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the EM:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So I'm not seeing much difference so far, are you? The biggest difference is the price; I order the organic Bob's Red Mill flour online, and the shipping doubles the cost of the flour ($12.00 for 20 lb. of flour plus $14.00 shipping). The 50 pound bag of Eagle Mills cost just over $18.00. Duh...

After all this, how did they taste? Well, in a side by side tasting, the clear winner is...um, well I think I liked...er, uh, actually, they tasted very similar! And this is actually good news, because I don't have to spend so much on flour anymore.

It was a fun experiment, and I was even able to keep track of which dough blob was which throughout the whole thing.

Sue

 

mluciano's picture
mluciano

This bread fever is contagious! After seeing me baking bread for two weeks, my husband decided he too was going to make bread. Because he loves baguettes so much, he decided he was going to try lesson 2 from floydm's tutorial... So, while I was making my Honey Wheat Bread, he was making his own bread... Here's the result...

My husband starting his project

That's my husband starting his first baguette...

The huge loaf...The huge loaf...

The result...

The result of both my Honey Wheat Bread and his first baguette....

Baguette

It is absolutely delicious!!!!!!!!!!! And like good PR's we are enjoying it with a good cup of coffee.... I LOOOOOOVE BAKING BREAD!!!!

helend's picture
helend


I posted this in respose to quip from Paddyscake on th boiled fruitcake thread but know I will forget where I put it so am creating a new blog

adapted from a Terence Stamp wheat, dairy and sugar free recipe and can be made using a single dried fruit eg apricots, plums or sultanas.

My wheat version (note dairy option) here as follows:

  • 2 tsp easy-blend yeast
  • 6 oz white or wholemeal flour (spelt in my case)
  • 3 tsp mixed spice
  • pinch salt
  • 3 oz ground almonds
  • 3 tbs rapeseed oil or melted butter
  • 1 grated eating apple
  • 1 grated carrot (or small courgette)
  • 8 oz dried fruit
  • approx 6 fl oz water or milk

Preheat oven to 170c (fan oven). Line a 7" round cake tin.

Sift flour, spices and salt into a large bowl. Stir in yeast and almonds, then grated apple, carrot and dried fruit.

Drizzle ove oil, then use enough water or milk to make a soft dropping consistency mixture.

Turn into tin, level and bake for approx 1 hour until skewer comes out clean. Take out, wrap tightly in tea towl and leave until completely cool.

To take in to work on my birthday I made this using dried plums cut small and shaken with 2 oz sugar, a tsp almond essence and whole almonds on the top - oh and a good splash of Amaretto liqueur. It seemed to go down well!

zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

milk mixture:

1 cup milk.

1 tablespoon olive oil .

Filling:

450 g Feta Cheese .

chopped fresh mint.

1 teaspoon sumac.

1/2 teaspoon olive oil .

 *mix the Filling ingredients.

For dough :

2 1/8 cups white flour.

1 cup whole wheat flour.

1 1/4 cups warm water.

1 tablespoon dried mint.

1 teaspoon dry yeast.

1/4 teaspoon sugar.

1/2 teaspoon salt.

1/4 cup olive oil .

1)place all ingredients in the bowl of mixer ,beat 10 minutes to make a soft dough.

2)Cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

3)Divide dough into 8 pieces.

4)shape each piece into a ball.

5)Roll each piece through pasta machine set on thickest setting,fold dough in half,roll through machine,repeat rolling several times,dusting dough with extra flour when necessary.

6)Roll dough through machine ,adjusting setting so dough becomes thinner with each roll,dust with extra flour,when necessary.roll to second thinnest setting (1 mm thick),making sure dough is at least 12 cm wide.

 7)Cut into 2 pieces.

8)Brush it with milk mixture.

 9)Place 1 tablespoon of Cheese mixture,roll pastry over filling.

Video

 

 10)Brush the top with milk mixture.Cover and let rise for 20 minutes.

6)Bake at 400 for 20 minutes.

zainab

http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/

helend's picture
helend

I've ben practising this recipe for a while. I syill can't quite manage the same crumbly texture as the famous McVitie brand but getting closer ...

They aren't that pretty to look at but taste good

For approx 2 dozen biscuits:

10 oz wholemeal flour

6 oz fine oatmeal

2 tsp salt (nec for the sweet/savoury balance but you could use less)

2 tsp baking powder

6 oz butter/marg

3 oz dark brown/muscovado sugar

5-6 tbs milk

Preheat oven to 150c. Sift dry ingredients together, rub in butter, stir in sugar, use minimum milk to make a dough. Roll out just under 1/4" thick, cut out with a 3" cutter, prick and bake on greased baking sheets for 18 minutes until just browning. Shift to a cooling rack asap.

PS You can use about 10 oz of chocolate, melted to cover the tops.

 

 

prout's picture
prout

A loaf of white sourdough, made with normal plain flour and my starter.

I was very satisfied with the opening of the cuts and the colour of the crust. One of the best loafes I got out of my oven so far.

 

 )

Picture of the crumb: Good aeration, but still close enough to be able to spread butter on it ;)

White souddough crumb

White sourdough cut

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Sunday I finally got a real baking day in. It was the first time in... 2 months? 3 months? A very long time.

I started with the Sourdough English Muffin recipe that Kjknits posted a month or so ago.

They were *amazing*. There wasn't a terribly interesting smell or anything, but when I bit into one it was just one of those "Oh, wow" moments. I will definitely be baking them again.

Pretty nice crumb inside.

I don't have cutter or tins, I just used a mason jar lid. The ones I was happiest with I left about 1/3 inch tall when cutting and then squashed a bit wider and thinner before cooking.

I also make something like a cross between my standard pain sur poolish and the famous no knead bread.

The hydration on this was quite high, probably in the 70-75% range. It spread a little more than I would have liked, but the crumb was very nice (though slightly underbaked). Particularly nice since I'd run out of bread flour and was just baking with store brand AP flour.

I also made three sourdough loaves...

...and experimented a little with the scoring.

I thought it looked like a yin-yang, but my wife says it looks more like the Safeway Logo.

meedo's picture
meedo

This recipe from the Middle East, we eat it especially in Ramadan or any time of the year, cause it's so tasty.

 

For the dough:

2 cups all purpose flour

1/4 cup whole wheat flour

1 1/2 teaspoon yeast

1 1/2 teaspoon sugar

1 1/2 cup fat free milk

1 1/2 cup water

 

For the filling (ashta):

2 cups fat free milk

7 1/2 tablespoons corn starch

1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar

2 to 3 tablespoons thick cream (qaimar which is an Iraqi cream) but you can use the regular thick cream 

2 tablespoons rose water

1 teaspoon vanilla

 

Chopped pistachio

 

To make the dough:

1-Mix the entire ingredient and let it rest about 40 minutes.

2- Cook about 2 tablespoon of the dough mixture in a hot pan until it bubble (just cook one side).

After finishing let them cool then fold half round then fill them with the filling (Using pastry bag) then dip them in the chopped pistachios.

To make the filling:

Mix corn starch with milk and sugar then bring it to boil in a medium pan, stir until thickens, then add the rest of the ingredient.

Spoon mixture into a bowel, refrigerate until cold.

Pastry bag:

 

Qaimar (Iraqi cream):

Serve with honey or syrup:

Visit my blog: 

 http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/

meedo

Srishti's picture
Srishti

We picked gallons of currant this year growing in the wild, red ones, black ones, orange ones....

We made tons of fresh-currant ice-cream to start with.

Then I made banbury cakes:

Whole Wheat pastry flour- Banbury cakesWhole Wheat pastry flour- Banbury cakes

Babury 2Banbury 2

They were ummmmmm.... so goood

Today I made some 100% whole-wheat sourdough Currant & seed bread:

currant breadcurrant bread

currant bread 2currant bread 2

the bread is not sweetened. It's just a lean bread recipe to which I added pumpkin & sunflower seeds and lots of currants :)

Really good and tart :P

 

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Today's Vermont Sourdough came out better than the last. I tried to be brave and really work the slashes and I think they're better but need work. It made me a wreck because I thought the whole thing would collapse. They didn't and next time I will cut deeper. I was really happy with the crumb this time.Vermont SourdoughVermont SourdoughVermont SourdoughVermont  The bread did not get a dark crust like last time probably because I put it in a cooler oven this time. 460º then down to 450º. Also I let the loaves rise 2 1/2 hrs. till they were light and puffy but still (I hoped) had more room to grow and they did once they hit the oven. I thank zolablue for that. This bread is so delicious it's my new favorite. I'm going to make it again for friends on Tuesday. I made today's bread to give away and as you can see I cut them in two but the breads going to my sister and she doesn't care. I had to see inside, right?

 

I hope many of you try this, it's an easy one. Also, like I said I added the salt along with the other ingredients in the final dough and there's no problem that I can detect.VERMONT SOURDOUGH

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