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zoltan szabo's picture
zoltan szabo

Hello to everybody,


I would like to share with you guys my todays bread. I used 100% hydriation sourdough and ground caraway.


 



Formula:


 



ingredients

% quantity mea need mea
Flour 100% 375 gr 375 gr
Water 66%   gr 247.5 gr
Starer 34%   gr 127.5 gr
Salt 2%   gr 7.5 gr
Oil 2.5%   gr 9.4 gr
Total          

 Plus 1 level teaspoon of ground caraway seed.

I mixed together every ingredients yesterday , then today morning i knead it back, then placed into a floured banneton. I left to proof for 3hrs then baked in 220C oven for 30 min. rested on wire rack.

The crust is a wee bet chewy but a bit crunchy(if this makes any sence).

happy baking! zoltan

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer


 


Got this idea from "Flavored Breads: Recipes from Mark Miller's Coyote Cafe", it reconstructs the classic pastrami on rye sandwich, and makes the ingredients (pastrami slices, onion, mustard, cream, milk, and rye) into a flavorful bread. However, the book only has volume measurements, and the ingredient ratios look rather "interesting" as the result. If I assume 120g of flour per cup, I end up with a 89% hydration level, without counting that 1/2cup of yellow mustard! So I basically changed up the ingredients ratio according to my preference, and turned the bread into a sourdough one too. 


100% starter, 200g


bread flour, 200g


rye flour, 180g


milk, 120g (I used nonfat)


heavy cream, 120g (it add some richness to the bread, just like Russian dressing does to a traditional pastrami rye sandwich)


butter, 28g


salt, 2tsp


mustard, 1/2 cup (I used yellow mustard I had on hand, but the book recommends half Dijon half whole grain mustard, I will try them next time, I image the flavor will be different)


brown sugar, 1tbsp, packed


pepper, 1tsp


onion, 2tbsp, diced (I used some caramelized onion I had on hand)


pastrami, 113g, cut into thin slices


 


- Mix together everything but onion and pastrami, autolyse for 20 minutes.


- Knead until gluten starts to develope, then knead/fold into onion and pastrami. It's a bery stick dough, and my hands were a nice shade of yellow.


- Bulk fermentation for 3.5 hours, S&F at 30, 60, 90 minutes.


- Shape into a batard (a big one, over 2lbs, I was too lazye to divide it), put into a brotform, cover and into the fridge it goes.


- 2nd day (15 hours later), take out and finish proofing (about 100 minutes)


- bake at 430F for an hour, steam for the first 15 minutes as usual.



 


Pretty decent ovenspring and bloom considering all that rye flour, and pastrami



 


Moist crumb, very flavorful. Mustard taste is very noticable, which I like, and I think a better quality/flavor mustard would enhance the bread even more. Pastrami and onion also play dominant roles in the taste.Not the most open crumb, but expect from a rye bread with so much fillings.



 


We all like this bread, tastes great, a meal in itself. The book has other intersting flavor combos that I want to try, but I probably won't use the exact formulas from it.


bakinbuff's picture
bakinbuff

I decided to try making a savory olive bread using my usual sourdough recipe, and just adding herbs and chopped Queen olives.  I would occasionally buy an olive baguette from our nearest supermarket, until they stopped making them.  It was a good thing I only bought them occasionally, they were delicious and somewhat addictive.  Anyway, having enjoyed getting the hang of basic sourdough bread, I decided this would be the perfect base for an olive bread.  Because I have lots of fresh Rosemary growing in the garden, that seemed like an obvious and delicious addition, and who can eat Olives and Rosemary without a little Oregano?  Anyway, I mixed it all up yesterday morning, let it triple over about 4 hours, shaped and popped it in the fridge.  I re-shaped just before bed, and baked this morning.  All I can say is YUM!!!  I don't know whether this loaf will make it past today...


 



 


Recipe and Method:


1 Cup of high hydration starter directly from fridge


1 Cup of freshly ground whole wheat flour


1.5 Cups of strong White Bread Flour


1 scant  tsp salt


Handful of pitted sliced Queen Olives


Handful of finely chopped Rosemary


Pinch of Oregano


1 Tbsp Olive Oil


A few splashes of warm water


 


I mixed everything up in a bowl with a stiff plastic spatula, then turned it out and kneaded for 10 minutes until smooth and elastic.  Placed back in oiled bowl and covered with clingflim, and left in a slightly warmed oven for 4-5 hours.  By then it had nearly tripled so I shaped into a boule, placed on parchment paper on a baking tray and put in the fridge.  Reshaped at 10pm and put back in the fridge.  Took out of the fridge and turned on the oven with roasting pan and stone inside at 8am.  Baked in preheated oven under the roasting pan for 20 minutes at 250C, then reduced temperature to 190C, removed roasting pan and baked another 15 minutes.  I let it cool on the counter and cut when just barely warm.  Yum yum yum!  Will try REALLY hard to wait until lunch to eat another slice......


 

koloatree's picture
koloatree

Greetings all,
Last week I tried the Portuguese sweet bread from the book titled "Bread and Pastry" by Micheal Suas. All I can say is that it is pretty darn good! I highly recommend it.


Question, I noticed that the dough can double its original size 4 times. However, I baked after the dough doubled in volume from its final shape. Would it be better to wait till the dough doubles its original volume 3.5 times?


The following is the formula.


Preferment



  • bread flour

  • water 192%

  • yeast 32%

  • milk powder 90%

  • sugar 45%


ferment for 1hr at 70 degrees


final dough



  • bread flour

  • water 40%

  • eggs 15%

  • yeast .4%

  • salt 1.29%

  • sugar 30%

  • butter 14%

  • sponge 35%


Mix all, wait till doubled in volume, shape, wait till doubled in volume, bake!


I baked with convection, a little steam, at 380F for 20-30mins. I also did a quick egg wash on 2 and sprinkled a little raw sugar. I plan on making a cinnamon sugar version and another one with fruit and nuts.



 



 



 


 


extra chunky chocolate chip cookies. (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Best-Big-Fat-Chewy-Chocolate-Chip-Cookie/Detail.aspx)


 


 


Chausiubao's picture
Chausiubao

So I'm writing a recipe for everyone. Its intended so that anyone, regardless of experience can try to make bread. So far, I've been told that the recipe reads as a technical document. As yet, I'm not sure if thats a good thing or a bad thing. 


But please read and tell me if its not detailed, too detailed, or in general too wordy.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


4.00 Cups Bread Flour
1.00 Cup Water
4.00 Tbsp Water
1.00 Tbsp Instant Yeast
1.00 Tsp Salt
3.00 Tbsp Melted Butter


Notes:


Bread flour has protein content of between 11-14%, the bag should say which, but all purpose works too (generally the more protein the better)


Instant yeast can be mixed directly in with the flour, bread machine yeast works, but if all you can get is active dry yeast use 1.5 tablespoons, and proof it in water with some sugar first, it should bubble (use some of the water you have measured for the bread).


Water at around body temperature is great, around 80-90F (25-30 C), but any hotter and you risk getting the water too hot for the yeast. Use your finger as a thermometer (finger test!), if you can't tell if the water is hot or cold, use it.


(the instructions to this recipe may seem long, but I am describing everything from start to finish in as much detail as I can, really the process is quite simple)


Procedure:


1.) Melt your butter.
2.) Measure out all your ingredients. Mix the flour and yeast in a large mixing bowl, then mix in the salt.
3.) Pour the water and melted butter into the mixing bowl on top of the dry ingredients.
4.) Using one hands, scoop and fold the ingredients in the bowl; with the other hand continuously turn the bowl.


After a few minutes the dough will come together into a sticky mass.


5.) Turn the dough out onto a table and knead the dough by stretching it away from you and folding it towards you.
6.) Seal the fold by pushing the dough against the table.
6.) After sealing the fold give it a quarter turn (turn it 90*) and repeat until the dough is smooth and tacky.


You will know the dough is finished when it is smooth, and just slightly grabs your fingers (tackiness). By this time your hands should be no longer covered in dough (the gluten has settled).


7.) Cover the top of the dough with plastic wrap to prevent oxidation, and boil a small pot of water
8.) Put your mixing bowl into a turned off oven, put the steaming pot of water below it
9.) Let the dough ferment until it has doubled in size (this takes about one hour)
10.) Take the dough out of the bowl and divide it into sixteen equal sized pieces


11.) Beat one egg with salt to make egg wash.
12.) Line a baking pan with parchment paper (dusting with semolina flour, or oiling up the pan also works)
13.) Lay the dough onto the paper seam side down, and brush it with egg wash
14.) Boil some water in a small pot; cover the dough with plastic wrap
15.) Put the baking pan in the oven (with the oven off) along with the steaming water for about 15 min


Press Test: press the dough, it should spring back halfway, thats when you know its proofed


16.) Preheat your oven to 400 F, bake the rolls until they are well browned and sound hollow when thumped


When baking, you must always bake it until it is done!


17.) Let the dough cool before cutting into it


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Thanks


--Gabriel

droidman's picture
droidman


I've been working on this one for quite awhile. The original was a variation on the Basic Sourdough in the Bread Baker's Apprentice. Between trying different proportions of the ingredients and consulting the good advice on The Fresh Loaf, I've arrived at this version, which I'll probably stick with for awhile. I've pushed it up over 75% hydration, so I've had to switch from kneading to stretching-and-folding. 


Have also solved problem of oblong boules by turning them out of the bannetons onto small sheets of parchment, instead of sliding directly off the peel. Don't know why I didn't think of this before. Saw it in DMSnyder's educational scoring video and had one of those forehead slapping moments. Still need to work on my scoring...


Regarding the goat milk: I've tried this recipe with whole milk and half-and-half, and have to say that there's something about the goat milk that I cannot put my finger on... I want to say that the flavor is more creamy, but I don't know if that makes sense. 


Firm Starter (biga)



  • wild yeast starter (75% hydration) [200g]

  • bread flour (Dakota Maid) [163g]

  • water [92g]


Final Dough



  • bread flour [617g]

  • whole white wheat flour [127g]

  • sea salt [20g]

  • goat milk scalded then cooled to room temp [307]

  • water at room temp [307]


Steps



  1. Mix up firm starter, mist with spray oil, cover bowl with plastic wrap, let rise for approximately 4 hours until doubled.

  2. Refrigerate overnight (12 – 18 hours).

  3. Remove starter from fridge and set on oil-misted countertop. Cut into multiple small pieces, separate, mist with spray oil, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to warm to room temperature (a couple hours).

  4. Mix final dough. If mixing by hand like I do, you'll probably have to turn it onto the counter and knead a couple minutes to make sure starter is fully incorporated.

  5. Cover and wait 10 minutes. Then do a series of 4 stretch-and-folds, every 10 minutes or so. 

  6. Allow to rise for 3-4 hours until doubled.

  7. Cover tightly, and refrigerate overnight.

  8. Remove from refrigerator and allow to warm up a couple hours. 

  9. Gently remove dough from bowl, shape into two boules, place in floured bannetons, lightly mist bottom with spray oil, cover and proof for at least four hours.

  10. Preheat oven containing bread stone and steam pan to 500 degrees at least one hour before proofing is complete.

  11. Sprinkle semolina on bottom of loaf, then flip over onto piece of parchment paper on peel. Score loaf as desired.

  12. Pour one cup of water into steam pan.

  13. Slide onto baking stone.

  14. Bake until internal temp is nearing 205 degrees, 15-25 minutes.




     

    cpc's picture
    cpc

    I decided to try the Gérard Rubaud bread that so many people around here seem to be enjoying.  I followed dmsnyder's instructions using a single levain build.  I had quite a bit of trouble shaping this dough into batards; it was sticking to everything and didn't seem to have much strength at all.  I proofed the loaves in a (improvised) couche but during proofing they seemed to fall and spread out instead of rise.  Fortunately they sprang quite a bit in the oven.


    My scoring mostly disappeared! This seems to happen quite a bit to me.  I think they might be under-proofed or not scored deep enough.  Maybe?






    I'm not sure about this crumb.  Yes, there certainly are holes!  But I'm wondering if they are from poor shaping technique because the non-hole crumb is a bit dense.


    Nitpickiness about scoring and crumb structure aside, these loaves taste great!  Thanks to dmsnyder and TFL for the formula for a fantastic loaf!


    dmsnyder's picture
    dmsnyder

     


    The Gérard Rubaud Pain au Levain au Levain has been a smash success for all those who have made it. Thanks again to Shiao-Ping for bringing this remarkable bread to our attention after reading about it on MC's blog.


    The most remarkable features of this bread are its fabulous aroma and flavor. How much they derive from Rubaud's very special flour mix and how much from his fermentation and other techniques has been a matter of some speculation. So, today I made my San Joaquin Sourdough using Rubaud's mix of flours. I did not use Rubaud's flour mix in the sourdough starter. I used my usual flour mix of AP, WW and Rye.


     Gérard's blend of flours comes through. It's my new favorite San Joaquin Sourdough version.


    The aroma of the baked bread was intoxicating, and the flavor was wonderful. Rubaud is not a fan of cold fermentation, if I understand MC correctly. The San Joaquin Sourdough uses an overnight cold retardation of the dough before dividing and proofing. In comparison to the Rubaud pains au levain I've made, the San Joaquin Sourdough was noticeably tangier. I happen to like that, but others may not.


    I also tried to use Rubaud's method of shaping his bâtards, which accounts for the “charming rustic appearance” of my loaves. I trust that, after another 40 years of practice, mine will be almost as nice as Gérard's. 



     


     


    Flour Wts for Levain & Dough

    Grams

    Flour

    Total Wt. (g)

    Total for Levain

    156.33

    AP

    404.38

    Total for Final Dough

    421.35

    WW

    103.98

    Total of Flours for the recipe

    577.68

    Spelt

    51.99

     

     

    Rye

    17.33

     

     

    Total

    577.68

     

    Total Dough:

    Baker's %

    Weight (g)

    Flour

    100

    561.8

    Water

    76

    426.97

    Salt

    2

    11.24

    Yeast

    0

    0

    Conversion factor

    5.62

    1000

     

    Levain:

    Baker's %

    Weight (g)

    Flour

    100

    140.45

    Water

    75

    105.34

    Starter

    20

    28.09

    Total

     

    273.88

     

    Final Dough:

    Baker's %

    Weight (g)

    Flour

    100

    421.35

    Water

    76.33

    321.63

    Salt

    2

    11.24

    Pre-Ferment

    58.33

    245.79

    Total

     

    1000

     

    Procedure

    1. Mix the firm starter (1:3:5 – Starter:Water:Flour). Let it ferment at room temperature for 12 hours.

    2. Pour the water into a large mixing bowl. Add the starter and dissolve it in the water.

    3. Add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover tightly and let it sit for 20-60 minutes.

    4. Sprinkle the salt over the dough and mix thoroughly using the “stretch and fold in the bowl” technique. Let it rest for 30 minutes.

    5. Repeat the “stretch and fold in the bowl” for 30 strokes 2 more times at 30 minute intervals.

    6. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board, and do a stretch and fold.

    7. Return the dough to the bowl and cover.

    8. After 45 minutes, repeat the stretch and fold on the board.

    9. Reform the dough into a ball and replace it in the bowl.

    10. Allow the dough to continue fermenting until the volume has increased 50%.

    11. Cold retard the dough for about 20 hours.

    12. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and immediately transfer it to a lightly floured board.

    13. Divide the dough into two equal pieces and pre-shape them into logs or rounds, depending on whether you want to make boules or bâtards. Cover the pieces with plasti-crap and let them rest for 60 minutes. (Give them a shorter rest if the kitchen is very warm. You don't want them to expand very much, if any.)

    14. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and your steaming method of choice in place.

    15. Shape the pieces and place them in bannetons or on a couche. Cover the loaves and proof them until they have expanded by 50-70%. (30-45 minutes)

    16. Pre-steam the oven. The transfer the loaves to a peel (or equivalent). Score, load them onto your baking stone and steam the oven again.

    17. Turn the oven down to 450ºF.

    18. After 12 minutes, remove your steaming apparatus. Turn the loaves 180º, if necessary for even browning.

    19. Continue to bake the loaves for another 15-18 minutes or until their internal temperature is 205ºF.

    20. Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack.

    21. Cool the loaves completely before slicing.

       

      David

      Submitted to YeastSpotting

      P.S. If your scale doesn't measure to 0.01 gms, don't be concerned. I'm playing with a new spreadsheet which generated the numbers above. Feel free to round at will.

     

    txfarmer's picture
    txfarmer


    2/14 is Chinese New Year this year, to celebrate the year of tiger, I baked the "tiger cake" above. Inside, it's a "tiger print cake", which is really a zebra cake in disguise. The Recipe is from: http://www.azcookbook.com/zebra-cake/



    Then I made Burnt Orange Silk Meringue Buttercream from"Rose’s Heavenly Cakes", a complicated recipe but so worth it. I don't know why some people dislike her method, she's so detailed and precise, I've always gotten good results following her instructions. Not necessarily the most authentic results, but always the results she promised. Finally I drew the little tiger and tiger prints on the sides. Honestly that's the most time consuming part!



     


    Now for the Valentine's Day, I made Apple Caramel Charlotte, also from "Rose’s Heavenly Cakes". Again, tastes and looks great, even though the instruction was 7 full pages, and it took me 3 days to complete.



    The creme was silky smooth, matches perfectly with the slightly tart apple topping






    Matches perfectly with the roses I got from my husband!


    rossnroller's picture
    rossnroller

    Hi folks. ABC Rural Radio's 'Bush Telegraph' program has a regular segment called 'Food On Friday', and last year they broadcast a feature on sourdough bread. This included an interview with John Downes, the so-called "father of Australian sourdough", who is currently spreading the love in the UK.  I found the whole program compelling listening.


    Because of the time that has elapsed, the segment is no longer archived on the ABC Rural Radio site, but a staff member kindly made it available to me on request. I have now embedded an MP3 recording of the segment in my recent blog post, so it can remain a publicly available resource. Thought people here might be interested in having a listen. If so, you'll find the MP3 at the following link:


    Sourdough Rising - The Artisan Bread Baking Revolution


     


    Cheers all
    Ross

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