The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Anne-Marie B's blog

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Anne-Marie B

The tastiest sourdough I have ever baked. And also the most aromatic. It is one of those recipes that you bake in an enamel cast iron casserole dish and it just did not rise as much as I hoped. It had to prove in the fridge for two hours before being tipped into the hot pot, but I went swimming and it spent at least double that time in the fridge. I am not sure it that may have affected the rise. It is the best tasting bread without a doubt.

The mix of applesauce, ground almonds and orange is a great flavour combination. The recipe also included raisins, but I felt it did not quite feel right with the other ingredients so I gave it a miss.  Orange flower water is very strong in terms of its perfume, so I settled for a half teaspoon and zested two oranges instead.  I think it turned out perfectly in terms of taste. I will make this one again and again. 

The original recipe https://breadtopia.com/sourdough-apple-almond-raisin-bread/

 

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Anne-Marie B

Our winter arrived very, very early and with a bang. Blizzard conditions in the alpine areas nearby and flash flooding and gale force winds at home. I packed a fire and spent the day baking. These came out of the oven first. A quick, one rise recipe. I took a few pictures immediately, because they are not going to last.

Recipe here: http://www.mymoroccanfood.com/home/2015/8/15/moroccan-semolina-bread-fig-and-tahini-pinwheel

 

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Anne-Marie B

Crisp scrolls filled with layers of tahini and cinnamon. Easy and delicious. A keeper.

 

The experience is enhanced by listening to Giovanni Gabrieli's brass sonata - pian' e forte

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Anne-Marie B

I used my 'cheat' sourdough starter for this one. It is reasonably quick because it uses yogurt and a 1/4 teaspoon of instant yeast and makes a fair volume of starter. The recipe stated 180g of starter refreshed with 80% wheat and 20% rye flour.  The bread is made with coconut water and also contains grated coconut. Slow rising, it sat in the fridge overnight for its first rise and I finally baked it the next evening. I love the way the aroma of the coconut takes over the kitchen when you toast it. We took the final slices with us when we went hiking in the mountains.

Recipe from Bake-Street.com

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Anne-Marie B

The various Rosellas in our garden loves eating the lavender seeds, sometimes daintily holding it with their feet while eating. It served as my inspiration for bread this week. Lavender makes me think of France, so voila, Lavender Fougasse! 

The lavender flavour is very strong, so I used only a sprinkle and combined it with rosemary and orange thyme. I used my wheat sourdough starter for this one.

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Anne-Marie B

Leftover brandy from all those festive season plum puddings and cake.  So I decided to make Sweetened Brandy Buns for brekky in the new year. Not nearly as sweet as I expected. It is quite good with something more savoury, butter and a gentle cheese like a gouda. From The Handmade Loaf by Dan Lepard.

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Anne-Marie B

I have not posted anything for ages. It has been a busy year full of life changes, gardening and travelling. I mainly stuck to my usual recipes. But I received the recipe for this interesting cake in West Australian Yoke Mardewi's December newsletter. Just had to try it and it is delicious. Next year should be more settled with lots more experiments in baking, roll on 2019!

Recipe here: http://wildsourdough.com.au/recipe/wild-sourdough-spelt-khorasan-christmas-cake/

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Anne-Marie B

A fond adieu to Portugal with this light semolina loaf, pao Alentejo, from Nelson Carvalheiro's recipe. It starts off with two different starters, one made with bread flour and one with rye. Left them overnight to bubble and mixed the bread the next morning. I got busy in the garden, so it overproofed a bit. I gently knocked it down and shaped the loaf according to Berndt's method and let it rise in a bowl lined with well-floured cheesecloth. It all worked well except that I could not get the required ridge when it baked. I probably did not flour the end of the roll enough before putting it down to rise. It is one of the nicest tasting breads I have ever baked. I will make it again and keep on trying to get the right ride along the loaf.

 

 

 

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Anne-Marie B

 

 Pao de Figo. Another Portuguese bread. The filling is made by slowly cooking dried figs and fresh rosemary in port wine. You roll out the dough and spread the filling on half. Fold the other half over, cut into strips, twist and braid. The braid is formed into a circle and left to rise. But the recipe did not specify the amount of water to use. I started with half a cup and it was a bit too dry. I added another quarter cup, which was too much. The dough was a bit too soft and it collapsed in the oven. It looked like the sultan was in a hurry when he put on his turban in the morning. Oh well, it is still very good with a strong cheddar. 

 

Recipe here: http://portuguesebreads.blogspot.com.au/2016/12/pao-de-figo.html

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Anne-Marie B

My sister recently bought a house in Portugal. That got me interested in Portuguese breads and I discovered their treasure trove of breads. For the next few weeks I will be baking breads from that little sunny land and aided by Miguel Forte's blog on Portuguese breads.  Bolo do Caco is from the Islands of Madeira. They are made with a sourdough starter and contains sweet potato. Traditionally baked on a slab over an open fire, mine was cooked in a dry skillet on the stove over a very low heat. Soft and moist inside, probably due to the sweet potato. Tradition in this house demands that the first roll/slice of a fresh bread is eaten warm with heaps of butter. 

 

 

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