The Fresh Loaf

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My First try at Anis Bouabsa Baguettes

mlayne's picture
mlayne

My First try at Anis Bouabsa Baguettes

Well, they're finished and it was very interesting working with such slack dough in a screaming hot oven.  Extremely difficult to shape.  I was afraid to do the normal elongate, fold, seal routine for baguettes so I simply stretched them to length like ciabatta.  They were really difficult to score.  My lame couldn't cut smoothly through the skin and there was pulling rather than cutting.  After 20 minutes at 480f and 100% steam in the Anova they were looking almost burned which seems to be normal for this method.  

I followed the directions without modification.  Mixed, rested, folded, rested in the fridge for 21 hours, portioned straight from the fridge, rested for an hour, shaped, let rise on the couche for 45 minutes then into the oven.

Photos show the results, they're still cooling so I haven't checked the crumb yet.  I'll post more when I cut into them.  Comments, criticisms and snide remarks appreciated. 

mlayne's picture
mlayne

Photo of Crumb of my first Anis Bouabsa Baguette

I cut into the loaf not expecting much but I'm very pleased with the crumb and the taste.  Since taking a bite caused me to close my eyes I've stopped worrying about the appearance too much but I'll be making more of this recipe and hopefully with practice the external looks will someday match the taste and the crumb.  Great bread.

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

I only try my hand at baguettes occasionally, so I'm familiar with the "rustic" shape! :) They look great from here, Mike, and the true test is that you enjoyed their texture and flavor!  Shaping comes with practice (a lot of it)....but you get to eat all the practice, so.... :)

Enjoy those with some cheese, maybe a Parisian sandwich with some butter, and ham? :)

Rich

mlayne's picture
mlayne

I had a nice ham and brie sandwich built on a Kerry Gold buttered baguette for lunch today.  It was my box standard poolish 67% hydration baguette and it was good but this one blew its doors off for flavor and crumb.  I plan on working with this one until I get it to look right and I also plan on working with Ciabatta and Focaccia at about 80% hydration just to get used to working with wet dough.

My go-to loaves of bread to keep in the house are Hamelman's 40% Rye, an enriched 100% whole wheat sandwich loaf and an enriched 67% AP 33% whole wheat 10 grain with sunflower seeds, and of course baguettes.  It makes it tough to lose weight but we do love baguettes.

Thanks for the kind words.

Benito's picture
Benito

The Bouabsa baguettes are well liked by the baguette brigade on TFL.  I like the organic appearance of the cracks that formed on the surface of your baguettes.  To make the scoring easier, you can place your shaped baguettes en couche into the fridge for 15 mins to firm up the dough.  This will make scoring easier so the blade will drag less.  You can also dip the blade into olive oil or water to help the scoring as well.

I haven’t found that the Bouabsa dough to be more difficult than other baguette dough to work with.  What flour did you use to make it with and at what hydration?

Benny

mlayne's picture
mlayne

I appreciate your suggestions and I'll give them a try.  I used Bob's Red Mill AP flour at 73% hydration.  It's my go-to AP here in Oregon.

alfanso's picture
alfanso

From me - https://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/63557/simple-pleasures-idy-baking

And from MTloaf - to me, he is the acknowledged master of the Bouabsa baguette. https://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/63580/baguette-virus-spreading

 

mlayne's picture
mlayne

Thanks, I'll check them out this evening.

foodforthought's picture
foodforthought

You might want to check out David’s (dmsnyder) version of Gosselin baguettes. His work with Bouabsa and Gosselin resulted in his excellent San Joaquin Sourdough recipe. He writes the most excellent procedural notes, too.

I think your bread looks lovely. Agree that cold dough will probably improve handling characteristics. I often make dough for multiple loaves and keep it refrigerated for up to 3-4 days (no more than 5) then have fresh bread every other day or so.

May the yeast be with you,

Phil

mlayne's picture
mlayne

I'll check it out.  I'm making dinner for a guest this evening so I'm making focaccia. fresh pasta and Caesar Salad to go with the ragu and creme brulee that I put together yesterday.  Should be pretty good.  The ragu and custard are resting so I'll just need to heat the ragu and brulee the custard tonight. In addition to making the pappardelle pasta and focaccia.

foodforthought's picture
foodforthought

You might want to check out David’s (dmsnyder) version of Gosselin baguettes. His work with Bouabsa and Gosselin resulted in his excellent San Joaquin Sourdough recipe. He writes the most excellent procedural notes, too.

I think your bread looks lovely. Agree that cold dough will probably improve handling characteristics. I often make dough for multiple loaves and keep it refrigerated for up to 3-4 days (no more than 5) then have fresh bread every other day or so.

May the yeast be with you,

Phil

mlayne's picture
mlayne

really good.  I've made pan d' campagne with 5% ww and 5% dark rye before and liked it a lot.  I'll definitely put the San Joaquin Sourdough on my to-do list.

mlayne's picture
mlayne

I used Janedo's yeasted levain this time and applied the suggestions received to chill the shaped loaves before scoring with an oiled razor blade on my lame.  Both suggestions were excellent and helped a lot.  I highly recommend them to anyone working on high hydration baguettes.  The loaves came out pretty good, certainly prettier than my first batch. For some reason, I hit a huge hole when I cut into this baguette.  Go figure.

Now my levain for David's San Joachim Sourdough Baguettes is working on the counter and will be mixed in later this evening.

As always criticism, comments and snide remarks are welcomed.

 

  

Benito's picture
Benito

Good improvements there. If I may offer a diagram on how I score my baguettes. The scores are in red and the beginning and ending of each score in blue. Imagine your baguette divided longitudinally into three lanes approximately equal widths. Your scores should stay in that middle lane. Ideally each score should overlap with the next by about ¼ to ⅓. If they don’t overlap the baguette will end up sausage link shaped with lobes. Your blade should be angled at about 30-45* from the surface of the dough. This will give you nice ears.

mlayne's picture
mlayne

with the scoring part of making baguettes.  Your's look very professional and I'm appropriately jealous! 

I try to stay down the middle and only slightly angled right to left; with the blade held at about a 45 degree angle; and about 1/3 overlap; but my slashes always seem to have a mind of their own and roll to the left more often than not.  I decided that I like the 250g baguettes because they fit my smaller Anova oven better than the 330g ones I had been making in my wall oven but I may go back to the wall oven.  

I know there's no substitute for practice so I plan to make up 1k a day of some kind of baguette dough to practice on so I'll have 4 loaves a day to butcher.  Meanwhile, I gave away 3 loaves today that were still warm and yesterday I made bread pudding.  Silver lining to all the excess bread that seems to pop up around here.

Thanks for your help, I appreciate it very much.

Benito's picture
Benito

Nothing beats persistence and practice with baguettes, your two efforts are already showing improvements.  Your plan of baking them regularly will get you to your goals.  Nice to have another baker here interested in baking baguettes.