The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Yippee

Same formula as the 76% hydration baguettes in my 090510 entry.  However, a few changes took place:


 


Flour - switched to KA organic all purpose flour from bread flour


Having become more comfortable handling slack dough by referencing to dough kneading and shaping techniques from Susan of San Diego, SteveB of Bread Cetera and Mark of the Back Home Bakery.


And for the first time, I heard the 'singing' of my baguettes.


 


Next time:    Study David's Bread Scoring Tutorial and handle the dough even more gently.


 


After: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157618813197876/


Before: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617904188161/

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Yippee

Bundt shape for a colleague's birthday, traditional for ourselves:


 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157618022118071/

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Yippee

Adapted from a friend's home recipe, made with mashed bananas.  Very moist and light interior. 


Used Trader Joe's white whole wheat flour for the first time.  Couldn't tell the difference between KA and TJ flours.


KA $5.99, TJ $2.99.


 


090515 follow-up observation:


This sandwich loaf was still extremely pillowy soft (without toasting) 4 days after it was baked. This was the most long lasting softness I've ever experienced among all the sandwich loaves I've baked.  Must be the enzymes in the banana doing the trick.   No more report on this loaf since the last slice was gone.   


 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617984673373/


 


 



100% White Whole Wheat Banana Sandwich Bread    
The use of mashed banana significantly extends the keeping time of the loaf    
       
       
Adapted From KO's home recipe      
       
       
Water Roux Starter      
       
any amount is fine as long as bread flour (or whole wheat flour to make 100% WW) 50 g
the 1:5 ratio is followed water  250 g
       
  Whisk both until well mixed    
  Heat it up on stove, keep stirring     
  until temperature reaches 65 C or 149 F    
  (Yippee uses the microwave, about 4 minutes, stir halfway.)     
  (Final product should leave a trail when stirred.)    
  Put a plastic wrap directly on top to prevent forming a 'skin'.    
  Must be cooled to at least room temperature before use.    
  Refrigerate up to 3 days.      
  Do not use if turns grey.    
       
       
Makes 1 twin loaf (530g) plus about 4 - 5 rolls at 60g each    
       
A. whole wheat flour 332 g
  sugar  50 g
  salt 1 / 2 tsp
  yeast 8 g
  vital wheat gluten 2 1/4 TBS
B. whole eggs + milk  137 g
  water roux starter 106 g
  mashed ripe banana 50 g
C. unsalted butter 25 g
       
Knead: Combine A. and B. until a ball is formed.  Adjust by adding either flour or water 
  in small increments (1tsp ) to form the dough    
  Add C. and knead until the dough passes the windowpane test.  
       
1st Fermentation: About 40 minutes at 28 C or 82.4 F, 75% humidity    
       
Divide:  265g x 2 for the twin loaf, rest for rolls     
       
Relax: 15 minutes at room temperature    
       
Shape: twin loaf:    
  Deflate    
  Roll into an oval    
  With the long side facing you:    
  Fold 1/3 from top to bottom, press to seal    
  Fold 1/3 from bottom to top, press to seal    
  Turn seam side down    
  Roll and elongate the dough to about 30cm or 12 "     
  Upside down and roll into a cylindrical shape    
  Seam side down, into the loaf pan    
       
Final Proof: About 40 minutes at 38 C or 100.4 F, 85% humidity     
       
Bake: 350 F, 35-40 minutes    
  (Yippee applies whole egg wash before baking)    
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Yippee

My another 'first time' experience.  As always, I'm having fun while learning new skills and trying out new recipes.


It's a spiked dough retarded since Sunday. 


New technique applied:  Covering the bread with an inverted dutch oven while baking.


 http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157618023122996/

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Yippee

70% Whole Wheat Sesame Sandwich Bread    
Can be switched to 100% WW, but Yippee finds 100% WW too bitter    
       
Adapted From 'The 65 C Bread Doctor",  by Yvonne Chen    
       
       
Water Roux Starter      
       
any amount is fine as long as bread flour (or whole wheat flour to make 100% WW) 50 g
the 1:5 ratio is followed water  250 g
       
  Whisk both until well mixed    
  Heat it up on stove, keep stirring     
  until temperature reaches 65 C or 149 F    
  (Yippee uses the microwave, about 4 minutes, stir halfway.)     
  (Final product should leave a trail when stirred.)    
  Put a plastic wrap directly on top to prevent forming a 'skin'.    
  Must be cooled to at least room temperature before use.    
  Refrigerate up to 3 days.      
  Do not use if turns grey.    
       
       
Makes 2 loaves      
       
A. whole wheat flour 350 g
  bread flour (can be replaced entirely by ww flour) 130 g
  dry milk powder 140 g
  sugar (May reduce to 50g, Yippee uses more sugar to cover 90 g
  the bitter taste)    
  salt 7 g
  yeast 10 g
  vital wheat gluten 3  1/4 TBS
B. whole eggs 60 g
  milk 140 g
  water roux starter 120 g
C. unsalted butter 50 g
D. white sesame  50 g
  (Yippee washes the sesame, drain, and pat dry with paper towels after 10 minutes)
E. More white sesame for rolling the dough in    
       
Knead: Combine A. and B. until a ball is formed.  Adjust by adding either flour or water 
  in small increments (1tsp ) to form the dough    
  Add C. and knead until the dough passes the windowpane test.  
  Add D. at the last 5 minutes of kneading and knead slowly     
       
1st Fermentation: About 40 minutes at 28 C or 82.4 F, 75% humidity    
       
Divide:  into 2 pieces, each at about 450g     
       
Relax: 15 minutes at room temperature    
       
Shape: Shape like regular sandwich bread, 2 loaves    
  Roll the dough in sesame seeds.    
       
Final Proof: About 40 minutes at 38 C or 100.4 F, 85% humidity     
       
Bake: 350 F, 35-40 minutes    
  (Yippee applies whole egg wash before baking)    
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Yippee

This slack dough was more difficult for me to shape  and the baguettes were deflated when I tried to transferred them from the baguette pan to the stone.  Need to figure out a better way to do this.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617904188161/

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Yippee

I guess all the hard work and sleepless nights, even the dark circles under my eyes, are well worth it:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617903700219/

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Yippee

A variation of my previous whole wheat sandwich bread.  The lightest and the most aromatic I've ever achieved.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617873978308/

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Yippee

Little Yippees have had all these sandwich breads that I've been testing for weeks.  They are begging for a change.   Here it is, something different on the table for breakfast:


 http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617619002761/show/


 

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Yippee

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617674239548/


These baguettes were a result of the collaborative efforts of Yippee and Little Yippees. The kids enjoy eating foods that they took part in preparing more.  These turned out to be part of our lunch and dinner of the day.


These are better looking baguettes than my first batch.  However, there were even fewer air pockets than the first time.  May be this was due to excessive gas loss during shaping since I did not follow Mike's video this time.    


 Colors improved since this time I did everything I could to achieve a better color. 


1st, 2nd  and 3rd rises were all done in the fridge and each followed by stretch and fold. 3rd rise was unexpected and was used as a way to delay the process to a later time. Final internal temperature was 205F, a few degrees lowered than last time at which I found the crust was crispier.    

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