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Putting Marmalade into [Rye] Bread

Anonymous baker's picture
Anonymous baker (not verified)

Putting Marmalade into [Rye] Bread

There's been talk about using preserves for flavour in bread as you can see in my other forum post. A while back I did a Swedish Rye Bread (for which I have also posted a more recent bake here) and having no zester I substituted the orange zest for marmalade with fantastic results. The flavour shines through and gives the crumb a very good texture. Also think that rye does better with acidity and makes for a good pairing. I'll post my write up here, from breadtopia, and while some of it may not make too much sense since I was answering some points from previous posts you'll get the gist of it. You'll also see how I worked out the substitution should you wish to try it. 

 

1: Had no anise seed so used extra fennel instead. Between caraway and fennel I think fennel is most like anise seed.

2: Instead of using the usual molasses I used carob molasses instead. It is more liquid than the thick viscous cane molasses.

3: Had no oranges and even if I did I have no zester. So I used 20g orange marmalade jam instead. Don’t know if a perfect substitute but should be interesting!

4: Because of points 2 & 3, the more liquid molasses and the 20g jam, I reduced the water by 20g to try and get the same properties for the final dough when it comes to hydration. It seemed to give me a good result which was very similar to Eric’s dough.

The bread flour I used was a very strong 15% protein Canadian flour by Marriage’s and I used Dove’s Farm wholegrain rye.

The dough was sticky however by the time I finished the last of the stirring folding kneading alternative method it had strengthened up very well. The dough was holding itself together and had strength to it even though it was sticky. Left it to bulk ferment overnight.

This morning it was very well risen, much more so than Eric’s dough in the video, and seemed over done and far too sticky to handle just by looking at it however when doing the folds the dough soon tightened up and had a good strong structure. Shaping was not as difficult as I thought it might be just by looking at the risen dough.

I did not final proof in a basket. As per Eric’s advice, and I can see what he means, this dough would really suit a cloth lined banneton due to its sticky nature. So I final proofed and baked it in a lekue - silicone pouch. More support than freestanding or in a cloche but more room to expand then a loaf pan. While this method of baking obviously gave me a big advantage for a tall loaf I have to say even I was surprised. I’ve done other less challenging loaves this way which produced less oven spring so while I was expecting this method to help I wasn’t expecting such good results. This loaf exceeded my expectations and while I would have lost height on a stone or in a cloche I think there’s still potential for good oven spring. Something which I suspected when shaping due to feeling how much strength it had and a good gluten formation.

suave's picture
suave

I think it comes down to the relative aromas of the components.  In this case I suspect the sour and the spices will overpower the marmalade.  At least that's what happened to me when 10% of apple butter met coriander. 

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Using some top quality marmalade which had orange peel bits inside the flavours weren't lost and made a good pairing. I also think the texture was improved. Sort of tangzhongesque (I've coined this word). It was a substitute for orange zest after all. 

suave's picture
suave

Having solid bits of peel there will certainly help.

GaryBishop's picture
GaryBishop

You can bake in a silicone pouch? Could you share a link please?

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Loaf pan come Clay Baker. Baking in a tabletop oven has some challenges and for a while I used this for ease. I'd say it's good if you can't cook in a Dutch Oven or Cloche but still want some of the benefits. The final loaf lacks in the artisanal effect but it's a handy tool for very high hydration loaves. Rarely use it nowadays now that I have a Pullman but every so often it makes an appearance. What I don't like about it is you've got to be very careful removing the loaf when it comes to safety and not to spoil it. But if you make sure it's baked through properly and a crust has formed it should be ok. I'm not a great fan of it, I just happened to bake this loaf in it. 

https://www.lekue.com/en/cookware/bread-maker-lekue.html

It can have a place in one's kitchen but the Pullman is much better. 

Benito's picture
Benito

This is a great idea Abe, thanks for sharing it.  It would be an interesting use of the yuzu tea I recently fell in love with.  Your bake has a gorgeous crumb, well done.

Benny

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Out of all the times i've baked this bread it's this one that stands out. Hit the nail on the head when using marmalade with flavour and texture. Toasted up very well. 

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

Abe and Benny - your recent experiences with yuzu tea and marmalade stirred my curiosity about citrus flavors in general, and zest in particular. Especially since oranges and lemons are in season here in AZ right now. I discovered you don't need a zester, a  vegetable peeler combined with a sharp knife or food processor can produce the same result. So can a cheese grader. And I had never heard of lemon sugar before, which is generating ideas as well. See what you think. And thanks! ☺️

http://www.creativesavv.com/2013/01/zesting-oranges-easy-way.html?m=1

https://theviewfromgreatisland.com/how-to-make-lemon-sugar-recipe/

Benito's picture
Benito

JKS I’ve use the vegetable peeler when I’m making candied lemon peel, yummy!  The lemon sugar is an interesting idea too, thanks for sharing that.

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

I did use a marmalade with orange bits. A very nice brand called St Dalfour which uses good quality ingredients and is lower in sugar. The flavour really shine through. I'm trying to think which those of bread lemon would suit. Can vouch for rye and orange but never used lemon before. Thanks for those links.