The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Want lighter more airy crumb - Problem with second Proof

ewspears's picture
ewspears

Want lighter more airy crumb - Problem with second Proof

Hi!

This is my first Post and I'm hoping I can find some help here.

I have been making no-knead breads using bread flower have also used bread flower with 25% whole wheat & 10% Rye. I have used quick acting, instant, & sourdough on different loaves. I have used the 1/4 to 1/2 tsp yeast with cool water & 8-24hr, 72deg 1st proofing as well as the 1 1/4 to 2 tsp yeast with warm water & 1 to 3 hr, 85deg 1st proofing. Everything through this step seems OK, My dough has lots of bubbles and has more than doubled in volume

I degas, fold, & stretch the dough and place in a parchment lined container of appropriate size and shape for my 5qt dutch oven or my superstone bread baker. I give it a second proofing hoping it will double in size again; but it never does! All I ever get with the 2nd proofing is a 10 to 60% increase in volume. I have varied time and temperature to no avail. The better ones  are good and edible but not as light and airy as I would like.

Have wondered about mixing some beer or vinegar with the water. Also wonder about adding baking powder.

Would really appreciate any help! Thank You for any Response!

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

use a shorter first rise. Your yeast is probably eating up most all the food in the first rise, so don't double it.  Maybe 50%.  Also, use the finger poke test for the second rise, to see when it is ready to bake.  That way you'll get more rise in the oven.

Please  post a pic of your next loaf.

ewspears's picture
ewspears

I'm thinking You're "right on point" since I've always been on the high side of recipes on amount of yeast, proofing temperature, and proofing time

SourdoughSA's picture
SourdoughSA

Hi hi.....i trust you are well.

It might be a to long 1st proof, we also call it the bulk fermenting stage, because you use yeast.

It also depends how many % yeast did you use. Yeast is a quick thing, it ferments quick and eat up all the sugars, and if you ferment for to long, it starts to over oxidize the dough, and then it will starts to mess up your gluten instead of keeping it. You dough might even start to smell like vinegar after a while.

So try to add 1.8% yeast to your dough, bulk ferment overnight in the fridge, take the dough out the morning, chill it down for about an hour, shape it, and it will proof nicely, and then you can bake.

ewspears's picture
ewspears

I'm thinking You're "right on point" since I've always been on the high side of recipes on amount of yeast, proofing temperature, and proofing time