The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

This pic about says it all, but what?!

JPeezlepop's picture
JPeezlepop

This pic about says it all, but what?!

Hello,

In 6 months I've had great success with yeasted bread. I'm struggling now, trying to get natural yeast (leavens) breads to behave. Today inoculated with 2% mature leaven (starter). What do you think is happening here? This is what I did to achieve these gas giants amid an extraordinarily dense crumb...and these loaves were so heavy!:

main mix- 70% hydration, 75 deg F, 1 hour autolyse, add mature leaven (2% of main mix) and salt, hand mix well (pincer method 15 min), rest 30 min, fold, rest 30 min, fold, rest 45 min, fold, rest for duration of initial rise. Total 4 hours in 75 deg F proofing cabinet, pour out, bench rest 20 min, fold, divide, shape, put in well floured banaten proofing bowls

final proof 4 hours in 75 deg F proofing cabinet, put in preheated (450 deg F) dutch oven

Bake 30 min @ 450 deg F, then 20 min with the dutch oven tops off.

Hope you are all fine indeed,

Jim

BaniJP's picture
BaniJP

2% starter is waaaay too little to achieve any crumb (except if you have days to wait for a bread). I would up it to at least 15%, 20% is even better (and adjust hydration accordingly).

JPeezlepop's picture
JPeezlepop

Thanks, BaniJP,

I'm trying this (micro dosing of leaven) out on a suggestion from my fellow baker and brother. He does well with it. At this point, I'm just trying to get away from straight yeasted doughs.

Out of curiosity, if I had days to wait on this, would I put the time in at the main mix rise, or in the final proof?

Thank you so much,

JimP

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

then build the levain/starter/leaven gradually.  About 2% sourdough culture with each 2% flour and water, several times without discarding and feeding at peak activity (with equal ratios) until all the recipe water and flour is incorporated. The percentage of flour and liquids fed can vary depending on the taste profile you desire.  

BaniJP's picture
BaniJP

I believe either way works, but usually the bulk-fermentation is longer than final proof.

JPeezlepop's picture
JPeezlepop

Fabulous, Thank you

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

More starter and longer proofs.

What to do with these loaves?  They look like half rye?

JPeezlepop's picture
JPeezlepop

Thanks!

Truly

JimP

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Jim, that is a text book perfect picture of under proofed bread!

If you are not opposed to trying a different recipe, you might want to give this one a try. It is a great starter sourdough that has been targeted for beginning SD bakers.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/56678/123-sourdough-no-knead-do-nothing-bread

Danny

JPeezlepop's picture
JPeezlepop

I just wasn't sure what exactly what!

Underproofed!

I'm beginning to make sourdoughs now. After many nearly perfect loaves with straight yeasted doughs (all according to Forkish times and temps, all in dutch ovens) I'm finding that on this path I really need to get way more familiar with what the dough actually looks and feels like as it develops through the initial rise as well as the final proof.

Regardless, Thanks very very much. I'll look at that recipe too.

JimP

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 Let the dough be the teacher.  Mix up a dough, let's say the above 1,2,3 sourdough (a dough that has be well documented and discussed and played around and experimented upon) and all through the entire proofing and manipulating of the dough, take the time at least once every hour to observe the starter and the dough, slice open the dough to see what is happening inside as well as outside.  Make notes (use all your senses, touch, smell, see, taste etc.) slap the cut edges back together and get familiar with the dough, when and how it changes.

in the notes, be sure to note date, time, weather conditions and above all, the temperature and if it is constant or does it change throughout the process.  Note flour type and water source, salt.   Use a basic favourite flour for the loaf and keep the recipe simple so that future observations can be compared and added to this basic knowledge.

-pop quiz next weekend-    :)

JPeezlepop's picture
JPeezlepop

I'll do it and report in...until then,

Thank you,

JimP