The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bound to happen sooner or later

Anonymous baker's picture
Anonymous baker (not verified)

Bound to happen sooner or later

Turns out that halving Maurizio's porridge sourdough is still too much for one pullman. This one rose so well that this morning, when I went to check it after the final proof in the fridge, the dough had risen to the top and I couldn't get the lid off. So I baked it hoping it'd sort itself out in the process. A volcano erupted! Photo doesn't show the full extent of what I had to clear up. Anyway after baking it enough so I could prise the lid off, and spent a good few minutes trimming the top so I could get it out of the pan and returning it to the oven for a nice finish I think it's turned out quite good. I'll post more later after I cut into it and have a taste. 

Here is the link to the community bake. Please join in. I shall re-run the recipe as this was just a trial run substituting the flour and porridge. See you on the community bake page. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I have often wondered what would happen if the dough in the pullman over rose. Looks like we’re going to find out.

Failures are never welcomed, but we learn more from them than success  :)

I’m chicken, always under filled the pullman, but wanted to produce a square loaf for sandwiches. Any tips concerning how much dough to put into the pullman to get square slices? Since dough rises vary, it would seem there are no hard fast rules to answer this.

Dan

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

and show you what happens. That was my plan all along Dan :)

This was just a trial run mind you. Making do with flour at hand (bread, durum and kamut) and a barley flake soaker. Wished to use up stock before buying more. 

As it turns out, after making best out of a potential failure, I've actually got a perfectly square loaf. Apart from clearing up a mess it actually looks very good. Excess overflowed and left a good shape. 

I plan on redoing the recipe which will be my community bake. 

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

I like it!

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Thank you! Turned out very well in the end.

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Slightly gummy but that's probably due to the porridge and me fiddling about trying to salvage it instead of letting it bake through uninterrupted for the alloted time. I'm thinking it'll improve over a day or two. Taste is absolutely wonderful. So flavoursome with a lovely tang. A keeper! 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I think Maurizio talks about the need to bake this thoroughly. The oats hold a lot of moisture so he bakes it a long time.

I think the slice looks pretty good. As you probably know, the bread does not lend itself to open crumb.

The CB is posted. You may want to link to this bake on it.

Danny

The Roadside Pie King's picture
The Roadside Pi...

My first try at this was baked directly on a 5/8" thick pizza steel covered with a dutch oven. Rather than lower the temperature or shorten the time I think placing a cookie sheet on the steel will keep the bottom from burning. Eureka!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Abe wrote, “Slightly gummy but that's probably due to the porridge...”. I was thinking about that. We know the oats hold a lot of water. The technical hydration of the formula is ~100%. In the case of your bake using a pullman (covered) pan, maybe the bread would benefit if it was completely removed from the pan and baked a while in the oven to release (vent off) some of the internal moisture that was trapped inside the covered pullman.

Just a thought.

Danny

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

I did take it out but that was after an interrupted bake. The crust had formed and taking it out only serves to darken the crust which happens quickly so can't leave it in too long. I think the gumminess is that the nature of the pullman is to make a sandwich loaf which restricts the full potential of the crumb being open. So while freestanding it would have been more open and therefore less chance of gumminess which would be more the nature of a porridge bread. But today it has improved a lot and think over the next 24 hours it would have all but disappeared. But by that time so would the bread :) It is very tasty indeed! And I urge everyone to try this recipe. Thank you Dan. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Abe I am using this 13 x 4 pullman. Can you recommend a total dough weight for that pan?

Did your bread release well from the pan?

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

If so then I can say that if you half Maurizio's porridge recipe exactly (which is what I did) then you'd probably need to further reduce it by another 200g at a guess! Different doughs will need different amounts in the pullman so what's correct for this recipe might not be best for another. But if I were to do this again this it what I'd do. 

Another reason why it might have turned out gummy was because it was over filled. I also used jumbo barley flakes as a soaker which would not have absorbed as much water as oat porridge. I reckon sticking to the recipe (flour and porridge) and not over filling the pan will be just fine.

My bread always releases well from the pan due to the 3 holes at the bottom which enables steam to circulate and for the bread to release. I see yours doesn't have this so you might not have the same experience. Grease it well. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Abe, what are the measurement of your 2 lb pullman?

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Ignore the misinformation. It's a 2lb loaf pan and a generous one at that.  

21 x 12 x 11.5cm H

What us the length, breadth and height of your pullman in centimetres? 

If your L x B x H is equal to mine then the volume is the same. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

First I converted Abe’s pan from Cm to inches.

cm = 21cm x 12cm x 11.5cm

4.724 x 4.527 x 8.26 = 177 square inches for Abe’s Lakeland (brand) pan.

4 x 4 x 13 = 208 square inches for the USA (brand) Pan

 

177/208=.85

 

Abe’s pullman is 85% of the large USA Pan pullman.

 

Multiple the weight of Abe’s dough times 1.15 to get the weight of the dough needed to fill the LargeUSA (Brand) Pan

 

Abe, what is your best guess at the perfect dough weight for your Lakeland pullman?

 

If someone has time to check my figures, that would be nice.

Dan

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

overflow and trimmings should make good ones !  I am waiting to order my USA pullmans from Breadtopia when the newest ones come out this Summer. I have resisted buying till then. I too wonder how one gets it just right to fit in the pan...I guess trial and error. c

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Innovative. I believe Dabrownman has a way but it does include some educated guesswork on how much it'll oven spring. Best of luck. I love the pullman when it works a treat. 

OldLoaf's picture
OldLoaf

I blew the top off my pullman once.  Miscalculated my dough weight and 10 minutes into the bake "BAM"!  Though my stove blew up!  The pullman pan was fine, but the dough was unrecoverable.  Lesson learned...

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Looks like you didn't fare as well as I did. Thank goodness I got a lovely loaf out of it. Great crumb and delicious.

merlie's picture
merlie

I bake Jeffrey Hamelman’s Toast Bread every week in my 9”x4” Pullmans. He suggests 1lb 8oz of dough for this size pan. I have found that 1lb 9oz is perfect for each of two loaves . ( with enough dough left over for two dinner rolls.)  I did try just dividing the dough in two and  of course it stuck to the lid - I baked it anyway with disastrous results ! It poured passed the lid like an exploding volcano  and cooked to a crisp . Very difficult to get the lids off.......

merlie's picture
merlie

I bake Jeffrey Hamelman’s Toast Bread every week in my 9”x4” Pullmans. He suggests 1lb 8oz of dough for this size pan. I have found that 1lb 9oz is perfect for each of two loaves . ( with enough dough left over for two dinner rolls.)  I did try just dividing the dough in two and  of course it stuck to the lid - I baked it anyway with disastrous results ! It poured past the lid like an exploding volcano  and cooked to a crisp . Very difficult to get the lids off.......