The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine Attempt - Some Spring, but Air Pockets and Dense Areas

NicolaiM's picture
NicolaiM

Tartine Attempt - Some Spring, but Air Pockets and Dense Areas

I followed the NYT Tartine country loaf recipe with the only modification being using 55g of leaven vs. a tablespoon. Proof was 12 hours. I'm not sure what to tweak to get a better crumb structure and spring. Am I overproofing?

Also, the dough was pretty chewy / gummy. What can I do to lessen this?

 

Here are pics of the loaf:

 

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

Hi Nicola.. I looked up the NYT recipe for Tartine you mentioned to see if the described the recipe differently than the book. Generally it's on point, but yes you're over-proofed / fermented if I'm saying that correctly.

A few thoughts. First the levain: yes stick with a table spoon of starter  as it's all you'll need - assuming you have a good and active starter, that's enough. I also don't think you need the temp to be at 75 to 80 during the first phase of half hour folds as they suggest. If your kitchen is particularly cold, then getting to the end of that bulk fermentation is going to take a bit longer, but being too warm is going to create too much yeast at this stage and the dough will be overly fermented by the end of your final proof. If you think it's just too cold in your kitchen to do the bulk fermentation, then turn your oven light on (not the oven itself) and place it in there between the half hour folds. That will create a warm environment that should work out well. 

As to the overnight proof, once you've shaped and placed your dough in the basket get it into the fridge unless you want to bake it the same day. 10 to 12 hours later get your stove pre-heated. You don't need to let the dough get to room temp the next morning. You can load it cold from the fridge into your oven and it will be fine.

These are all small tweaks but they'll make a big difference.

Just look at your dough along the way, let it tell you when to move to the next steps. You might want to do a finger dent test on the dough when you take it out of the fridge the next day too while in the basket - that will give you some sense of if it's over fermented or not.

You're so close.. just give it another try.. let us know!! bake happy .. bread1965

NicolaiM's picture
NicolaiM

Thanks, really helpful to get this validation. I appreciate it and will definitely post follow-up pictures from my next bake this weekend!

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

How old is it? How did you make it? What's it like when active? etc

NicolaiM's picture
NicolaiM

Ah yes, good question. I should have clarified. I didn't use Robertson's starter recipe. My starter is based on https://www.theperfectloaf.com/7-easy-steps-making-incredible-sourdough-starter-scratch/

Could that make a difference in the bake?

It's about 3 weeks old. I'm getting good rise and bubbles when it is active. I'm pretty sure the problem isn't in the starter.

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

A lower hydration all bread flour recipe? This recipe makes a lovely sourdough and it has detailed instructions. 

http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/sourdough-pain-naturel/

Make notes and take photos of each stage. 

NicolaiM's picture
NicolaiM

Thanks, that looks like a great one to try in the future. I'd first like to understand what I'm doing wrong with this recipe though. I want to get to a place where really understand what I'm doing with this recipe and what's happening throughout the process vs. just attaining an end result. And, yes, great tip about the making notes and taking photos - thanks!

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

Making notes and taking photos will help. Is your loaf over fermented? Could be! I'm of the opinion it's starter related. Whether it was used at not the optimal time or something with the maintenance has resulted in your starter to be off balance with the yeast population who can tell. There's not a lot to go on. Not enough info and detail. I've seen issues you have experienced in young starters which may be unpredictable. If I were you I'd give your starter some TLC for the next few days giving it some good feeds and not feeding again till it's peaked each time. Then I'd take a simple, low hydration, bread flour recipe and try to follow it as closely as I can. After which we'll be clearer about what's going on. 

An idea for a feed is twice a day (although if it takes longer to peak then wait). A feed of 1:5:5 and use 50:50 bread flour and wholegrain. Keep at room temperature. Aim to bake over the weekend.