The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Mixing Salt types?

MTDreams's picture
MTDreams

Mixing Salt types?

Greetings,

I made my Pate Fermente with Kosher Salt [as I was out of sea salt.]

Tomorrow I will make the Baguettes.  Can I use the sea salt in the dough(I bought it today)?  Or do I need to stick with Kosher as that is what is in the PF?

Thank you!

Lechem's picture
Lechem

One salt is preferred over the other but as I've seen fine sea salt as the preferred salt in many recipes I cannot see why this would be a problem. As long as it's fine. 

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Absolutely but as lechem hints, it may be too chunky which may cause it to leave chunks in the dough.  If its course then crush it to a finer grade ;) 

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

Sea salt is a total waste in bread...you won't be able to taste the difference. Save it for sprinkling on top of stuff.

pul's picture
pul

I have used mildly coarse salt without any issue in the past, but now I grind it

AlanG's picture
AlanG

I always use sea salt because it is what I have in the house.  Salt is nothing more than ionic sodium and chlorine, NaCL.  Yes, sea salt has some trace amount of other minerals in it that pure NaCl does not have.  Other than using rock salt (the kind for deicing roads which is really large crystals), the coarseness of most salts should not matter at all.  The hydration in your dough will be enough to dissolve all the salt over the time period that most of us use for mixing, folding and letting rise.  My brand of sea salt is moderately coarse and I've never had any 'chunks' in any loaf.

Portus's picture
Portus

... when destined for home-made pasta recipes, as anything other than fine salt will jam the rollers or clog the extrusion dies.

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Agreed its just NaCl with possible trace minerals and most people would not be abe to discern the difference in taste - however, some sea salts a quite course.  Consider a cold double hydration where a slow mix partial h2o cycle is followed by a 2 minute quick mix to develop gluten with remaining h2o.  Even if larger particles only just finished disolving, 30 seconds to ensure a finer grade is worth the time - if salt is salt (aka NaCl) then bread is just bread (FWYS) 

MTDreams's picture
MTDreams

Thank you to those that replied with constructive comments!

FYI - the baguettes turned out awesome (with mixed salt).  Accompanied by home made Cioppino... it was a top 10 dinner!