The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hokkaido milk bread - unreal!

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

Hokkaido milk bread - unreal!

Hi all,

 

Just made this Hokkaido milk bread.

Floyd, thank you for the inspiration, your words sank into my mind "the silkiest and softest"... yes, it is!

 

I used a mix of these flours in the final dough: 2 parts of KA AP four and 1part of 00 Antimo Caputo flour.

I utilized the Tangzhong method with a mixture AP four, water and milk, and the final dough had milk and heavy cream. For the second rise, I divided the dough in 4 parts and rolled them this way: rolled each part into an elongated oval, using a rolling pin, then folded both sides to the center lengthwise, flattened it with the rolling pin, and then rolled it into a tube, pinching seems. Both resting stages took about 1 hour and 15 min. I baked it at 350F, for almost 40 min.

My observations: the dough is super fun to work with; the tangzhong method that I used for the first time, really impressed me; the bread is unreal, cloud-like look, the lightest, and yes, "the silkiest and softest", and my family absolutely loved it!

This bread is a must to bake, and its destined for success!

Happy baking!

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

It just has to taste as good as it looks, with all of the work that you put in to the preparation. 

Thanks for sharing!

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

yes, it's so so yummy, can't resist it lol...thank you!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Looks great. :)

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

It really is an amazing bread!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

fun to make.  I've gone total Japanese with this bread and make it with yeast water.  Even more soft and fluffy, hard to believe,  the kind of crumb only yeast water can give to bread.  Well done indeed and happy baking Stella

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

I would love to try it too! I am always opened for new experents...

the bread was absolutely delightful! thank you very much!

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

how should I adapt a milk bread recipe to make it with the yeast water? And should I still use the tangzhong method anyway? Thank you!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and instead of milk I use half and half or usually cream for the dough liquid since some of what would be milk is YW. - The half and half or cream sort of makes up for the missing whole milk  Witht the butter and the egg it is pretty rich. The levain is 20% pre-fermented flour with equal amounts of YW.  Just make the Tang Zhong and the rest of the recipe the same.  I don't know if comes out any better than your fomne exampe but YW just sounds more authentic Old Time Japanese to me.  Good luck.  This one takes a while to proof since ther is no commercil yeast in it,so be patient.

Happy Hokaido baking 

bikeprof's picture
bikeprof

really nice work...but no one gets away with posting a loaf like that without a complete formula (and/or link to one).

I also like to ask what people who really nail a bread what they take to be the keys to success are with that particular bread...???

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

Thank you for your nice words.

 

i made quiet an extensive research in this particular bread. In general, I don't make anything until I know as much as I can about it, including the background, how it was created, where, a true authentic recipe of it, if availble, why some ingredients vary and what they contribute to a particular bread or since I also bakes cakes and cookies, to them too. For example, that's how I developed my own ravioli pasta dough recipe. If you google it, you will see many recipes, but why do they vary, why amounts vary? I got to the science of it and arrived to a recipe that makes perfect ravioli every time! The same for my focaccia bread, some sourdough breads and this hiccaido  bread.

As to this particular bread, I saw Floyd's creation and just got absolutely excited about this bread. So, as usually, I made my reaserch and created my version of the recipe.

 

You will need a loaf pan, 9x5 or a little bigger is ok too. 

I used Kitchen Aid stand mixer, that I just got as a gift. :-) I only used speed 2 for the kneading process.

Tangzhong

25g  - AP flour (I always use KA)

125g - mixture of water and milk (42g milk and 83g water)

As you see, the classic ratio in tangzhing 1/5.

Final dough

400g flour (a combination of KA AP four and Antimo Caputo 00 flour 2/1 ratio)

50 g - cast sugar

90g - milk

60g - heavy cream

25 g - mill powder

1 egg

2 Tbsp - butter

2 tsp - instant yeast

1/2 tsp salt

tangzhong mixture

 

egg wash: 1 yolk and 1 tbsp milk, beate...

 

In the bowl of my stand mixer, I put flour, sugar, milk powder, yeast, salt, egg, milk, heavy cream, and tangzhong. At this point, I did not add butter yet. I started on a stir mode for a minute and then swithed to speed 2 and kept kneading the dough for about 4 minutes. I checked the dough for development, consistsncy, etc. and I added butter at this time. I kept kneading the dough for another about 10 min. I was checking the dough. I believe observing the process is important, checking the dough from time to time. Then I stopped the mixer and transferred the dough to a lightly greased bowl. The dough should be very elastic, smooth, certainly formed into a ball. I covered the bowl with the plastic food cover. It took about 1 hour and 20 minutes to double in size. 

Then i turned the dough onto a mat, it was not sticky, you almost need no flour to roll it, it's just so much fun to work with the dough, it just "listens" to your hands. Here how I worked with it. I separated it into 4 equal parts. I worked with one part at a time. I rolled each part into an elongated oval, folded its sides lengthwise to the center of the oval, flattened it slightly with the rolling pin, and rolled it into a tube, pinching the seems. Then I placed the roll into a prepared (greasd) loaf pan seem side down. I repeated this with each of the 4 parts. They were pretty tight in there. I covered with a tea towel. It took ablut 1 hour 15 to 1 hour 20 minutes to puff up to the size that it was close to 1 inch above the loaf pan. 

Brush the egg wash about 30 min into resting time, and again, just before baking. Make sure not to drip it anywhere but the loaf.

About 30 min prior to putting the bread into the oven preheat it till 350F. Bake the bread in the middle of the oven. It take 35-40 min.

Take the bread out of the pan and cool on the rack. And...Enjoy!

Of course the timings may slightly vary. So it's important to observe your creation during all the stages.

 

Happy baking!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Is the small percentage of salt correct? I calculate 0.07%, or 3/10% less than 1%.

I'm excited to try this bread, but need clarification before starting. I did check Floyd's post on this bread and it also looks low.

Yeast looks like 1.4%. I'm thinking that maybe the low amount of yeast coupled with the small amount of salt works to make the bread rise so high.

Dan

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

Hi Dan,

I really did not count a percentage of salt myself before baking this bread, but yes, you are correct! So I can confirm this. And you won’t be disappointed, it’s delicious! 

 

Hapoy baking!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

What should the internal temperature of the baked bread register? I normally bake sourdough to about 205° or more, but I'm not sure about this type of bread. I'm guessing less.

Would the loaf benefit from steam?

Thanks,
Dan

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

yup, 190-195 is usually enough, and I would not keep it in the oven above 200...I did not use steam, I don’t think this type of bread needs it, it had a beautiful oven rise just like that.. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I'm wondering if someone can tell me when to use SAF Gold instead of RED. I know that the Gold label is used for sweet breads that are high is sugars. But I'm not sure  what percentage of sugars is the starting point for using Gold.

 

I've contacted Lesaffre (makers of SAF) and I'm awaiting their response to this question. While writing this post Lesaffre called back. I was told the RED is recommended from 0 - 13%. And anything over that, Gold would be the best choice. By my calculations this recipe is 11.76%, so RED seems to be the one.

BTW, I followed GrowingStella's recipe exactly and the bread is baking now. The rise is out of sight and the smell is outstanding.

Since I didn't know how to proceed with the Instant Dry Yeast, I use 50% Red and 50% Gold.

Dan

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

thank you for sharing the information! You are great!

and so happy the bread is coming out just as expected, fantastic!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Thanks Alexandra, I followed your instructions to the letter and the bread came out wonderful. I was out of my league dealing with a dough of such low hydration. I use an Ankarsrum to mix and had to resort to the dough hook in order to knead the dough properly. I normally use the roller and scraper, but not with this dough. When thoroughly kneaded this dough felt sort of like "play dough" to me. It was very easy to handle and it didn't stick to anything. 

I recommend that the baking pan be well greased. I lightly greased my pan and had to coax it out with a butter knife. It appears that some of the egg wash dripped down to the bottom of the pan, causing the bread to stick slightly. Next time I'll grease moderately heavy.

My wife, the white bread connoisseur loved it. I also enjoyed it, but it won't soon be replacing my old school sourdough. At least as long as my teeth can chew the stuff ;-) . Great Recipe!

I've attached an image of the Spreadsheet for anyone interested.

If there is an interested I could setup a download link to the Spreadsheet and also the corresponding recipe instructions. Let me know...

Dan

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

the bread came out exactly as expected! And the way you were working with the dough, that’s exactly how the dough should feel and be. I agree with you WHOLEHEARTEDLY as to sourdough preference As opposed to white bread. I was thrilled to bake my sourdough every time, there is something in this process that facinates me! But I cannot bake only if I am eating them, so decided to listen to the the crowd lol, my family wishes! Lol 

and to add to that Brioche has more flavor and in my openion the most enriched bread having milk, butter and eggs in it. And I mastered it too...so focaccia and brioche are my family’s favorites...my son absolutely loves the german soft pretzels, amd It became a regular.

 

you mentioned, egg wash caused the bread to stick slightly, yes, it can certainly cause it, basically, it acts like a glue. And with brioche, too, have to use just enough egg wash to not cause it to spill under the bread...

anyway,your baking looks fantastic and thank you for the spreadsheet!

macette's picture
macette

I just got great results with your version of the recipe, my first try using another recipe caused me no end of trouble with a very sticky dough that was really difficult for an inexperienced baker. Your version was a joy to work with, now waiting for them to cool. I got 6 dinner rolls and 4 good size burger buns or sandwich rolls, can’t wait to try them they look amazing...thank you.

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

i am really happy you liked it and got a great result!

Thank you for the wonderful feedback!

 

happy  baking!

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

This looks so good! Bookmarked. Never done a loaf like this before but your success really wants to make me try it.

Lovely.

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

absilutely, try it, it's really really good! I am glad, I inspired you :-)

alfanso's picture
alfanso

I'll also add my admiration of this beautiful loaf.  I still have not tried a tangzhong based bread yet, but this may give me a desire to do so.  Thanks for the lovely post.

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

thank you for such nice words!

and I want to add that some people just make it look like it's a complicated method, but really is not, and so much fun! 

 The ingredients for tangzhong could vary, like milk or water or a mixture of both. And this method can be used in so many different breads, not only milk bread. You can convert almost any recipe to use it with this method. What you have to do is to take these ingredients out of your original recipe, not to add to it. And make the tangzhong in the ratio 1to 5 - flour to liquids, again out of your original recipe. 

But the Hokkaido milk bread, is where this method was used originally, invented by a Japanese baker. 

happl baking!

HansB's picture
HansB

Very well done.

GrowingStella's picture
GrowingStella

thank you very much!

pul's picture
pul

Beautiful loaf and so rich, congratulations. I got a Hokkaido milk bread gift from my neighbor who likes baking Asian pastries and breads. It was delicious and it kept moist for longer than a regular sourdough. I guess it is the result of using the Tangzhong which helps to trap moist in the dough. I have seen some German sourdough recipes using a similar Tangzhong idea, which I should try one of these days to see whether the moist can be kept for longer.