The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Danni3ll3's blog

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Danni3ll3

All of my other bread related obligations are done, so I can finally bake for the family. Cedar Mountain had posted a wonderful recipe that he called “Grass Bread”. This is an almost identical recipe with a few tweaks from me. Thank you, CM, for sharing that recipe.

 

Recipe:

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Add-ins

 

25 g hulless oats and 75 g water

38 g wild rice and 114 g water

25 g barley flakes and 75 g water

63 g large flake oats and 125 g water

 

Dough

75 g rye berries

75 g spelt berries

75 g kamut berries

75 g Red Fife berries

750 g unbleached all purpose flour

725 g filtered water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

40 g local yogurt

250 g 3 stage 100 hydration levain (procedure in recipe)

Wholewheat flour/all purpose flour for feeding the levain

 

Mid afternoon the day before:

  1. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of wholewheat flour. I used flour from our local miller. Let rise in a warm place (oven with the light on and door cracked open - 82F)
  2. Mill the grains and sift to obtain 250 g of high extraction flour. Save the bran for dusting the baskets as well as for another use. 
  3. Place the high extraction flour in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. Cover and set aside.

The night before:

  1. Place the hulless oats in a pot with the water. Boil one or two minutes and turn off the heat. Let sit covered overnight on the stove.
  2. Put the wild rice and the water in a pot and let soak overnight covered.
  3. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g of wholewheat flour including any left over high extraction flour. Let that rest in a warm place overnight.

Dough making day:

  1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of all purpose flour and let rise 4-5 hours in a warm spot. I deemed mine ready after 4.5 hours.
  2. Boil the hulless oats gently until the water disappears. They should be soft to the bite. I ended up with 50 g of cooked hulless oats. Cover and set aside. 
  3. Cook the wild rice until it has bloomed fully and most of the water is gone. Drain and reserve. Mine had actually done most of its blooming overnight and I just needed to cook it a bit to soften the a few hard pieces. This made 95 g of cooked wild rice. Add to the hulless oats.
  4. Cook the barley flakes in the water until the water has been all absorbed. This made 69 g of cooked barley. Add to the oats and wild rice.
  5. Cook the large flake oats with the water until soft and water has soaked in. This made more than 150 g but I used only 150 g. My oldest apprentice ended up with a bit of porridge. =) Add to the other add-ins.
  6. Two hours before the levain is ready, mix the water with the flour in the tub and autolyse for a couple of hours.
  7. Once the levain has doubled, add the salt, the yogurt, the add-ins and the levain. Mix well to integrate everything and let sit for 45 minutes in a warm spot.
  8. Do three sets of French slaps and folds at 30 minutes intervals. The first two sets have 100 slaps, and the last set has 50 slaps. Continuing on 30 minute intervals, do another 3 sets of folds. The dough was highly hydrated, therefore the extra work with it. 
  9. Let rest 30 minutes and then retard the bulk for two hours. The dough rose about 30%. 
  10. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~790g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  11. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  12. Sprinkle bran, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and hemp hearts in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 10 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425 F, and bake for another 25 minutes. I usually do 17 minutes but the loaves were still a bit pale for my taste. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Oven spring was pretty good and the loaves look quite festive with their coating of seeds. 

 

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Danni3ll3

I got 48 loaves done for my Xmas orders, and these are 12 extra loaves for those who missed out on the original ordering. I have a dear friend that owns a Fresh Fruit Bouquet place and she gave me space in her commercial freezer to store the loaves. These orders are being picked up there so she offered to do a mini Open House where a few of us will be selling pottery and a few other crafts. We have done a wee bit of advertising and so hopefully we will all sell some of our wares and make a few more people happy. I think I am crazy for having baked 60 loaves over a couple of weeks. 

 

On another note, you will see that I didn’t mill any flour for this recipe. I had a big bag of Wholewheat flour from the local miller so I decided to use that as it really is very good flour and I was feeling a tad lazy. I am still surprised at the amount of bran that I get out of his flour compared to mine. 

 

 

Recipe: 

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Recipe:

 

Add-ins:

150 g dried cranberries

131 g crumbed feta (sheep’s milk feta)

50 g sunflower seeds

 

Dough:

188 g sifted wholewheat flour from Brûlée Creek Farms (bran sifted out)

770 g unbleached flour

50 g freshly ground flax seed

725 g filtered water + 15 g

30 g plain yogurt

21 g salt

240 g 80% hydration levain

142 g of wholewheat flour from Brûlée Creek Farms (sifted to separate out the bran and used for the levain)

 

Two nights before:

  1. Take the 142 g of wholewheat flour for the levain and sift it to separate the bran. Reserve both for the levain.
  2. Take 3 g of starter and feed it 8 g of filtered water and 9 g of bran. Cover and let sit overnight.

The morning before:

  1. Feed your levain 15 g of filtered water and 19 g of bran/sifted flour.

The night before:

  1. Sift enough wholewheat flour to get 188 g of sifted flour. Save the bran from this for bran muffins or another use.
  2. Place the 188 g of the sifted Wholewheat flour in a tub, add the unbleached flour and the freshly ground flax. Cover and reserve.
  3. Measure out 50 g of sunflower seeds and toast in a dry frying pan until fragrant and lightly toasted. Set aside. 
  4. Before going to bed, feed the levain 31 g of filtered water and 38 g of the flour reserved for the levain.

Dough making day:

  1. Feed the levain 61 g of filtered water and 76 g of the reserved flour. Let rise till double. This took 4 hours in my 73 F kitchen.
  2. Two hours before the levain is ready, add 770 g of filtered water to the tub with the flour and flax, and mix well. 
  3. At this time, you can place the salt, the sunflower seeds, the cranberries and the feta on top of the dough and let it it there while the dough autolyses. Do not mix in!
  4. Let the dough autolyse for a couple of hours. 
  5. Once the levain is ready, add the yogurt and the levain to the tub and mix well. Let rest 30-45 minutes.
  6. Do three sets of French slaps and folds at 30 minutes intervals. The first set has 70 slaps, the second set has 40 slaps and the last set has 10 slaps. I did add 15 g of water to the tub after the first set of slaps and folds because the dough felt a bit stiff. Continuing on 45 minute intervals, do another 2 sets of folds. 
  7. Let rest an hour and a half in a warm spot (oven with lights on and door cracked open) and then retard the bulk for two and a half hours. The dough rose about 40%. 
  8. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~872g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  9. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  10. Sprinkle rice flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 10-11 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

 

 

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Danni3ll3

 Xmas batch # 3. One more batch of this same recipe and I’ll have all my Xmas orders done! 😊

 

Makes 3 loaves

 INGREDIENTS

770 g unbleached flour

110 g high extraction Red Fife flour (Mill 125 g Red Fife berries and sift. Save the bran for the levain.)

50 g freshly ground flax

1 tsp vital wheat gluten

620 g filtered water + 25 g

180 golden raisins (sultanas)

180 dried cranberries

35 g plain yogurt

2 tsp ground cinnamon

3.5 tsp of mixed spices (4 tsp ground cinnamon, .5 tsp each of ground ginger and ground cloves, 1 tsp each of ground nutmeg and ground coriander - Note this makes more than you need.)

22 g salt 

465 g of 4 stage levain (100% hydration)(Procedure in recipe)

Extra flour to feed the levain.

 

Two nights before:

  1. Take 16 g of your refrigerated starter and feed it 16 g  each of left over bran and filtered water. Let rise overnight.

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 32 g of bran/extra flour and 32 g of filtered water. I had some locally milled flour hanging around that needed to be used up so I utilized that. When I ran out, I used unbleached flour to feed the levain.

The night before:

  1. Mix the unbleached flour, the high extraction flour, the ground flax, and the vital wheat gluten well in a tub, cover and reserve.
  2. Measure out the cranberries and the golden raisins and place in a bowl. To the bowl, add the yogurt and mix well. On top of this mix, add the cinnamon, the mixed spice and the salt. Do not mix in! Cover and place in the fridge till the next morning.

Dough day:

  1. Feed the levain 128 g each of flour and water. Let rise till double. This should take about 4 hours.
  2. Take the cran raisin mixture out of the fridge to bring to room temp. 
  3. Add all the ingredients including the levain to the mixing bowl, except for the salt, raisins, cinnamon and mixed spices.  Mix until the ingredients are incorporated. Leave to rest for one hour.  
  4. After the dough has sat for an hour or so, add the fruit mixture and mix well to disperse the salt, spices and fruit. Let rest for a half hour.
  5. The plan was to do three sets of French slaps and folds (70/40/10) at 30 minutes intervals. However, the dough was so stiff, I was only able to stretch out the dough and do a double set of letter folds. I put the dough back in the tub and added 25 g of water and let that soak in for 30 minutes. 
  6. Then I was able to do 70 gentle slaps and folds. The reason for doing gentle ones is that the raisins and cranberries pop out of the dough and go flying. I have 3 four legged apprentices that have a good chance of getting sick if they eat raisins. Raisins are toxic to dogs. Even so, a few hit the floor and I had to be vigilant in grabbing them ASAP!
  7. I continued with another 2 sets of slaps and folds 30 minutes apart as per the plan. 
  8. Again on 30 minute intervals, do 2 sets of stretches and folds in the tub.
  9. Let rest an hour at room temp (73F) and then retard the bulk for two and a half hours. The dough rose about 40%. 
  10. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~830 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  11. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  12. Sprinkle rice flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 9-10 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

The boules were super firm when I tipped them out of their bannetons so I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was a very happy camper when I took the lids off after 30 minutes. They sprung nicely and smelled amazing! Quite pleased with these!

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Danni3ll3

This is baking batch #2 of the Xmas sourdough orders. 

 

I want to thank Wendy (Lazy Loafer) for outlining her method of bulk fermentation in the fridge and proofing/baking the next morning in her posts as I used this for the first time to accommodate my schedule. 

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

696 g unbleached flour

4 g vital wheat gluten 

250 g high extraction red fife flour (I milled 285 g of red fife berries and sifted it. Save the bran for the levain)

50 g buckwheat flour (I used 50 g of buckwheat groats and milled them)

1 tbsp of dried Italian herbs

725 g water

150 g of shredded 4 cheese mix (parmesan, Asiago, provolone and mozzarella)

100 g caramelized onions

36 g full fat plain yogurt

20 g salt

200 g levain (explanation below)

Plus high extraction whole wheat flour (local Brûlé Creek partially sifted flour) for levain

 

The morning before:

  1. Take 15 g of starter and add 15 g of high extraction wheat flour and 15 g of water. Let sit for 12 hours.

The night before:

  1. In a tub, put in the unbleached flour, the bread flour, the high extraction red fife flour, the buckwheat flour and the Italian herbs. Cover and reserve for the next morning.
  2. Use the bran from the red fife as well as some high extraction whole wheat flour to equal 30 g. Add this and 30 g of water to the levain. Let sit overnight.
  3. Thaw the caramelized onions if you have some frozen in advance. (Otherwise, slice one large onion and caramelize slowly on the stove with 1 tbsp of olive oil and a bit of butter as well as a pinch of salt.) Cover and reserve.

Dough making day:

  1. Very early in the morning, feed the levain 60 g each of high extraction whole wheat flour and water. This doubled in 5 hours at room temperature (73F). 
  2. About 2 hours before the levain is ready, add the water, mix well and let sit (autolyse) until the levain is ready.
  3. Add the caramelized onions, the shredded cheeses, the yogurt, the levain and the salt to the dough. Mix well and let rest about 30 minutes.
  4. Do three sets of French slaps and folds at 30 minutes intervals. The first set has 75 slaps, the second set has 40 slaps and the last set has 10 slaps. Continuing on 30 minute intervals, do another 3 sets of folds. Then I had to go out do the dough took a trip to the fridge. By the time I got back home, it was after midnight and the dough had been in the fridge 5 hours. So I decided to take a page out of Wendy’s book and leave it in the fridge for the remainder of the night to finish bulk fermentation. 

Baking Day:

  1. In the morning, tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divided it into portions of ~745 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  2. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle and continue stitching the rest of the loaf. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  3. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons, cover, and proof on the counter for not quite an hour and a half. Total time from the dough leaving the fridge and hitting the oven was just under two hours. 
  4. Forty-five minutes to an hour before the dough is ready, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a wide strip of parchment paper and carefully place the dough inside the pots. 
  5. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 208F or more.

 

The loaves are a bit misshapen due to the parchment paper. I have to figure that one out. 

 

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Danni3ll3

I don’t know why I do this to myself but I am doing Xmas Sourdough orders again like last year. The plan was to simplify and only offer two kinds of breads but somehow, I can’t say no and I am doing 3 kinds. And not only that… last year, I limited my orders to 36 loaves… somehow things go away on me and I am doing 48. So that means 4 baking sessions as I can only make 12 loaves at a time. 

 

On top of all of this, I have a bunch of other commitments that I can’t get out of. So the next 2 weeks are going to be crazy. Hopefully, someone doesn’t end up maimed or dead at the end of this!

 

So I apologize in advance if I am not going into as much detail as usual. First baking session is a Cranberry Wild Rice with Pepitas.

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Wild Rice:

75 g raw wild rice

10 g buckwheat groats

Soaker:

60 g pumpkin seeds, raw

150 g cranberries

200 g water

30 g honey

Dough:

700 g unbleached flour

200 g kamut berries

200 g spelt berries

575 g water

30 g yogurt

22 g salt

250 g 100% hydration 4 stage levain

 

A few days before:

  1. Bloom the wild rice with the buckwheat groats by the method of your choice. Once bloomed, refrigerate until needed.

Two days before:

  1. Mill the kamut and spelt berries, sift the bran and reserve 125 g of bran/sifted flour for the levain. Start building your levain (10g/10g/10g).
  2. Place the flours in a tub and reserve.

The day before:

  1. In the morning, continue building the levain (20g/20g).
  2. Toast the pumpkin seeds. Add the cranberries and the water. Soak overnight.
  3. At night, feed the levain again (40g/40g).

The day of:

  1. Do your final build of the levain (80g/80g).
  2. Add the honey to the soaker.
  3. A couple of hours before the levain is ready, add the wild rice, the soaker, and the water to the flours and mix well. Let sit covered at room temp (73F).
  4. Once the levain has peaked, add the yogurt, the salt and the levain to the dough. Mix well and let sit 30 minutes.
  5. On 30 minute intervals, do slaps and folds (75/50/10), and then go to stretches and folds (3 sets).
  6. Let sit for an hour and then refrigerate for a couple of hours.
  7. Divide into portions of 800 g and round with a scraper. Let rest for 1 hour.
  8. Shape into boules and put seam side down into bannetons.
  9. Cover and place into the fridge for 9-10 hours.

Baking day:

  1. Heat pots and oven to 475 F for an hour. Bake boules seam side up for 30 minutes at 450 F covered, and then at 425 uncovered for 17 minutes.

 

I got okay but not great oven spring for some reason. Maybe I shouldn’t have soaked the cranberries and added the add-ins later...

 

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Danni3ll3

I haven’t done this bread since the spring so it was time to give it a shot with the slap and fold method that I have been using for the last little bit. I increased the amount of whole grain a bit to get a bigger and healthier loaf. Hoping that this isn’t too much for the 3 quart Dutch ovens I have. 

 

Recipe:

 Makes 3 loaves

 

200 g spelt berries

200 g rye berries

200 g Kamut berries

820 g unbleached flour

50 g freshly ground flax

950 g filtered water

26 g Himalayan pink salt

40 g local yogurt

280 g 100% hydration levain (procedure for this is in recipe)

 

 Two nights before:

  1. Mill the kamut, spelt and rye berries and sift out the bran to feed the levain. Weigh the bran and set aside. Add enough fresh flour to the weight of bran to equal 140 g. Save the bran and this amount of flour for the levain. 
  2. Place the remainder of the fresh flour in a tub. Add the unbleached flour and the freshly ground flax. Cover and reserve.
  3. Remove 10 g of starter from your refrigerated starter and feed it 10 g of filtered water and 10 g of bran. Leave to rise overnight.

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of filtered water and 20 g of bran.

The night before:

  1. Feed the levain 40 g of filtered water and 40 of bran/fresh flour. Let rise overnight. It makes a very thick mixture. 

Main dough:

  1. Feed the levain 80 g of filtered water and 80 g of fresh flour. This should use up all of the flour saved for the levain. Let rise until double. Mine took about 5 1/2 hours at 73F.
  2. A couple of hours before the levain is ready, mix together the water and the reserved flour/flax mix. If mixing by hand, I found it easier to first put in 850 g of water, mix as much as possible and then add the remaining 100 g of water. Sprinkle the pink salt on top for the autolyse. Let rest for 2 or so hours until your levain is ready.
  3. Once your levain is ready, add it and the yogurt to the dough. Mix very well and let rest for 30 minutes.
  4. Do three sets of French slaps and folds (70/40/10) at 30 minute intervals. Again on 30 minute intervals, do 2 sets of stretches and folds in the tub.
  5. Let rest an hour at room temp (73F) and then retard the bulk for two and a half hours. The dough rose about 30%. Total bulk fermentation was 6 hours and 15 minutes (3.75 hours on the counter and 2.5 in the fridge). 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~875 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  8. Sprinkle rice flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 9-10 hours. 

 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

Well, I guess I should reduce the amount of dough a bit since the loaves all have flat tops from hitting the lid! 🙄 Otherwise, I am pleased with this version! Crumb shot when we cut into one.

 

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Danni3ll3

While looking through the kitchen pantry for inspiration, I came across a bag of Wild Blend Rice made by Lundberg. I normally use this rice for a wonderful Chicken & Wild Rice Soup made in the Crockpot but I had bought too much and this bag was sitting there saying to me: “You have been lusting after Ian’s Rice breads for some time, so here I am!”. Who am I to argue with a bag of rice? Ha ha!

 

I have Peter Reinhart’s Artisan Breads Every Day and  between Ian’s posts and this book, I managed to put this one together. 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Dough:

700 g unbleached flour

255 g Kamut berries 

155 g Rye berries

20 g dried onions flakes

85 g dry Lundberg Wild Blend Rice (~240 g cooked)

585g water + 30 g

125 g buttermilk

50 g honey

24 g salt

200 g of 4 stage 100% hydration levain (procedure below)

 

Two nights before:

  1. Mill and sift the Kamut and Rye berries. Reserve 200 g of the sifted Kamut flour and 100 g of the sifted rye flour in a tub. Add the unbleached flour and the dried onion flakes to the tub. Cover and reserve.
  2. In separate containers, save the bran and leftover Kamut and Rye flour for the levain.
  3. Take 5 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 5 g water and 5 g of the bran. Mix well. This will be quite thick. Note: I use the bran for feedings first to soften it up and when all the bran is used up, I start feeding with the leftover flour. 
  4. Cover and let sit overnight at room temp (73F).

The morning before:

  1. Feel the levain 15 g of water and 15 g of bran.
  2. Cover and let sit 12 hours at room temp.

The night before:

  1. Cook the rice mix in plenty of water until the rice is tender. I just put it on a low boil uncovered. Drain, cool and reserve covered in the fridge until the next morning.
  2. Feed 30 g of water and 30 g of bran or leftover flour to the levain. Let sit covered overnight at room temp. By the way, because the mixture is so thick, there won’t be a lot of rising. There will be a lot of holes and it will smell mature in the morning. 

Dough day:

  1. In the morning, prepare the final stage of the levain. Add 60 g of water and 60 g of leftover flour. Mix well and let sit at room temperature (73F) until it peaks; this took 4 hours. 
  2. At the same time, take the rice out of the fridge to bring to room temperature.
  3. An hour or two before the levain is ready, add 585 g water to the bowl with the rice, stir to loosen, and pour it all into the tub with the flours. Add the honey and the buttermilk, and mix until all the flour is hydrated. Autolyse (let sit) for an hour or two. 
  4. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, 30 g water (dough felt stiff, hence the extra water), and 200 g of levain. Mix well and let rest for 30 minutes.
  5. Do three sets of French slaps and folds (75/40/10) at 30 minutes intervals. Again on 30 minute intervals and in a warm spot (oven with light on), do 3 sets of stretches and folds in the tub.
  6. Let rest an hour and a half and then retard the bulk for two or three hours. If you can see bubbles through the walls of the tub, the dough feels jiggly and there are some bubbles along the walls of the tub, you could go ahead and divide the dough at this point but I wanted to extend the bulk without it rising too much so I decided to refrigerate the dough for a few hours. The dough rose about 20%. Total bulk fermentation was 7.5 hours (4.5 hours on the counter and 3 in the fridge). 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~765g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  9. Sprinkle rice flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 9-10 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

And if you are interested in the soup recipe, here it is:

 

CREAMY CHICKEN WILD RICE SOUP [SLOW COOKER]

YIELD: 8-10 SERVINGS

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

1 cup uncooked wild rice blend (NOT parboiled) I use Lundberg Wild Rice Blend.

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast

1 cup onions, chopped

3/4 cup celery, chopped

3/4 cup carrots, chopped

4-5 cloves garlic, minced

2 bay leaves

6 cups low sodium chicken broth

2 cups water (or additional chicken broth)

1 tablespoons salt-free seasoning blend (such as Trader Joe’s 21 Seasoning Salute OR Mrs. Dash’s Original Blend)

1 tbsp Thyme

1 tbsp sage

1/2 tbsp Old Bay Seasoning

1 tbsp Chicken Bovril (concentrated chicken bouillon)

3 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons olive oil (or substitute more butter)

1/2 cup all purpose flour

2 cups milk or light cream

Seasoning salt and pepper to taste

 

DIRECTIONS:

 

Rinse the rice under running water. Place the uncooked rice, chicken breast, onions, celery, carrots, garlic, bay leaves, chicken broth, water, Bovril and all the spices and seasonings (do not add the seasoning salt or pepper at this time) in a slow cooker. Cover and cook on the high setting for 3-4 hours or on the low setting for 7-8. In the last 1/2 hour of cooking, remove the chicken from the slow cooker. Allow to cool slightly before shredding using two forks.

When the rice is done cooking, add the shredded chicken back into the slow cooker. Melt the butter and oil in a saucepan. Add the flour and let the mixture cook for 1 minute. Whisk the mixture slowly while adding in the milk. Continue to whisk until all lumps have dissolved. Allow the mixture to thicken and become creamy.

 

Add this creamy mixture to the slow cooker. Stir to combine. Add additional water or milk to your preference if the consistency is too thick. Season with seasoning salt and pepper to taste.

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I got a request for a “7-grain with Bulgur” that I apparently made a while ago. The only thing I could figure out was that it had to be Hamelman’s 5 grain Levain that I had made with Bulgur. So here is a 7 different flours with seeds and grains version not counting the AP flour. 

 

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Liquid Levain build 

272 g flour 

343 g Water 

55 g Starter (if kept in the fridge, fed a few times prior to using in the Levain)

Soaker

100 g bulgur

100 g Flaxseeds 

76 g Sunflower seeds 

85 g old fashioned oats (large flake)

484 g Water, boiling 

6 g Salt 

Dough

533 g Unbleached flour 

15 g Vital Wheat Gluten

40 g high extraction Selkirk wheat flour 

40 g high extraction Red Fife flour

40 g high extraction Spelt flour

40 g high extraction Kamut flour

40 g high extraction Einkorn flour

40 g high extraction Rye flour

40 g Partially Sifted Brûlé Creek flour

303 g Water + 50 g + 21g

30 g yogurt 

21 g Pink Himalayan Salt 

All of the Soaker 

650 g Levain 

A day or so before:

  1. Main dough and levain prep: Measure 46 g of each type of grain for the high extraction flours, mill the berries, and sift. Use 40 g of each of the sifted flours for the main dough and reserve the bran and the remaining sifted flour to revive or feed the starter prior to making the final levain. 

The night before:

  1. Levain: Twelve to sixteen hours before the the final mixing of the dough, put all of the ingredients together for the levain and keep covered at room temperature (70-73 F).
  2. Soaker: Measure out the bulgur, and oats. Reserve. Grind the flax seeds coarsely in a Bullet or spice grinder. Add to the bulgur and the oats. Toast the sunflower seeds and add to the bulgur, oats and flax. Add the 6 g of salt. Add the boiling water to the soaker ingredients and cover. Leave to cool overnight at room temperature.
  3. Main dough prep: To the high extraction flours, add the unbleached flour, the Partially Sifted Brûlée Creek flour and the vital wheat gluten. Mix well to distribute the VWG.  Cover and reserve.

Making the dough:

  1. Put the water and the yogurt for the dough in a bowl and add the soaker. Mix well to loosen the mass. Measure 650 g of the levain, add to water and soaker, and mix again. Add this mixture to the reserved flour mix and make sure to mix well to a shaggy dough. Let sit for 60 to 75 minutes.
  2. My dough felt dry so I added another 50 of water with the salt. Mix well to integrate all ingredients. Let rest 30 minutes. Do three sets of slaps and folds on a bare counter at 30 minute intervals (50/40/10). I added 21 g of water to the dough after the first set because it still felt too dry and stiff. Continue bulk fermentation with 2 sets of stretches and folds also 30 minutes apart. 
  3. Place in the fridge for 4-5 hours. I left mine for 4 hours in a 38F fridge. The dough rose about 30%. 
  4. Pour the dough out onto a bare counter and divide into 3 loaves of about 920 g. Lightly flour the top of the portions and gently round into boules using a dough scraper. Let rest one hour on the counter. 
  5. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  6. Sprinkle a mix of rice and AP flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for ~10 hours.

Baking

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 475 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 17 -20 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

The daughter came home from her midnight shift at the hospital and persuaded me to cut into one of the warm loaves. Warm bread with cold butter from the local dairy, can’t get any better than that! 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

My brother asked me if I had any extra bread for his mother-in-law but all of my Kamut 3 Ways with Honey were spoken for. I had some left over levain after I mixed up my other dough so I threw this recipe together. Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to mill fresh flour, however, I did use flour from our local Brule Creek mill so it wasn’t all commercial flour. 

 

 

By the way, I am not sure if this qualifies for a 1-2-3 dough but I used that as my starting point.

 

Recipe

 

Makes two large loaves

 

Soaker

200 g of large flake oats

200 g boiling water

 

Main dough

250 g of 100% 4 stage levain

500 g of water

250 g partially sifted wholewheat flour (Brule Creek)

500 g unbleached flour

50 g honey

17 g Pink Himalayan salt

40 g plain yogurt

 

Soaker

  1. Pour boiling water into oats and let sit until cool.

 

Dough

  1. Pour the water into the levain, and add the oat soaker. Stir to loosen the soaker. Add the honey.
  2. Add the flours and mix well to hydrate all of the flour. Let sit for an hour.
  3. Add the salt and the yogurt. Mix well.
  4. Pour the dough onto a bare counter and do 3 sets of slaps and folds (70/40/30) each 30 minutes apart.
  5. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds in the bowl also 30 minutes apart. Let rest in a warm place for a couple of hours. The dough rose a fair bit but because it was in a bowl, I couldn’t judge the degree of rise. I might have overdone the bulk fermentation but the dough came out of the container quite cleanly. I would have gotten to it sooner but I was dealing with the other recipe.
  6. Divide into two equal portions of about 975 g and do a preshape. Let rest 45 minutes. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  8. Sprinkle rice flour and Oat flakes in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for ~10 hours.

Baking

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 475 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 16 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.
Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I was checking out my stash of grains and realized that I have a lot of Kamut. So I decided to do a repeat of a loaf that I did about a year ago. I did make a few changes to include things that I have learned over the past year and also decided to add some honey. 

 

And.... I forgot to add my usual yogurt. I didn’t feel up to par for some reason so I’ll consider myself lucky that the rest of the dough seemed to come nicely together. 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Sprouts

100 g Kamut berries

 

Soaker

50 g flax seeds

100 g Kamut flakes

300 g boiling water

 

Dough

700 g unbleached flour

250 g high extraction Kamut flour (mill and sift 285 g of Kamut berries)

50 g high extraction rye flour (mill and sift 60 g of rye berries)

570 g water + 30 g 

60 g honey

22 g pink Himalayan salt

200 g 100% hydration 4 stage levain (procedure in recipe)

Extra whole grain wheat or/and partially sifted whole grain flour for levain

 

Three days before:

  1. Soak 100 g Kamut berries in plenty of filtered water for 6 to 8 hours. Hubby forgot to drain mine while I was away at pottery so it was more like 12 hours!
  2. Drain and rinse the berries. Drain again and let sit at room temp (72 F).
  3. Every 6 to 8 hours, rinse and drain the berries, and keep at room temp  until the roots are about the same length as the berries themselves. This took about 2.5 days for me. Your mileage may vary. =D
  4. Rinse, drain very well and refrigerate until needed.

 

Two nights before:

  1. Take 5 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 5 g water and 5 g whole wheat flour.
  2. Let sit overnight.

 

The morning before:

  1. Feel the levain 15 g of water and 15 g of whole wheat flour.
  2. Let sit 12 hours.

 

The night before:

  1. Prepare the soaker by toasting the flax seeds in a dry frying pan. Place the flax seeds in a bowl, add the Kamut flakes and pour the boiling water over the seeds and flakes. Cover and let soak overnight.
  2. If you are using Kamut and Rye berries, mill into flour. You could use commercial whole grain Kamut flour and dark rye flour if milling your own is not a possibility. Sift to remove the bran. 
  3. Place 250 g of the Kamut flour and 50 g of the rye flour in a tub. To the tub, add the unbleached flour. Cover and reserve till the next morning.
  4. Save the extra flour and the bran to feed the levain. I ended up with a total of 20 g of Kamut/Rye bran and 21 g of extra Kamut flour.
  5. Add 30 g of water and 30 g of bran/extra Kamut flour to the levain. Let sit overnight at room temp (72 F). Note that the bran and the whole grain flour make for a very thick mixture.

 

Dough day:

  1. In the morning, prepare the final stage of the levain. Add 60 g of water and enough leftover Kamut flour and partially sifted whole grain wheat flour to make 60 g. Mix well and let sit until it peaks; this took 3 and a half hours. 
  2. An hour or so before the levain is ready, add 570 g water to the bowl with the soaker, stir to loosen the mix, and pour it all into the tub with the flour. Add the honey and mix until all the flour is hydrated. Autolyse (let sit) for an hour. 
  3. At the same time, take the sprouts out of the fridge to warm up on the counter.
  4. Once the autolyse is done, add the Kamut sprouts, the salt, the yogurt, 30 g water, and 200 g of levain. Mix well and let rest for 30 minutes.
  5. Do three sets of French slaps and folds (75/40/10) at 30 minutes intervals. The dough felt quite sticky for some reason. Again on 30 minute intervals and in a warm spot (oven with light on), do 3 sets of stretches and folds in the tub. The folds really helped pull the dough together. 
  6. Let rest until you can see bubbles through the walls of the tub, the dough feels jiggly and there are some bubbles along the walls of the tub. The dough rose about 30%. Total bulk fermentation was 4.5 hours. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~820g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 45 minutes to one hour on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  9. Sprinkle rice flour and Kamut flakes in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 9-10 hours. 

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

I was very happy when I lifted the lids and saw that these loaves had sprung nicely! They sure smell good!


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