The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Danni3ll3

I have had a number of breads that include onions bookmarked, but never got around to trying them. So this is my attempt at this.

1. Caramelize 3 diced onions in 1 tbsp each of butter and olive oil. Since I quadruple my recipes, this took me 3 hours! Normally, it takes 45 minutes to an hour. Set aside to cool. I prepared mine a few days ahead and put them in the fridge. I let them come back to room temperature before using them.

2. Autolyse 650 g unbleached flour, 50 g freshly milled buckwheat flour, 252 g freshly milled red fife flour, 50 g freshly ground flax seed, 1 tbsp and 1 tsp of dried Italian herbs (the plan was to use 2 tbsp but I didn't have enough), 50 g freshly grated parmigiano-reggiano cheese and 700 g of water. I found putting in 600 g of water first, mixing and then adding the last 100 g to work really well in mixing the initial dough. Due to other things interfering, I let the dough autolyse for about 3 and half hours. Wow! I was very surprised at how supple the dough felt after this. I will have to not be afraid of autolysing for longer than a couple of hours.

3. Mix in 30 g plain full fat yogurt, 72 g of caramelized onions (or all that you got from step #1), 20 g salt and 275 g of 80% freshly fed levain. My levain is usually rye and unbleached flour but I have a bag of whole grain Rogers Whole Wheat flour that I need to use up so I am feeding my levain that instead of the rye. I find things are a bit slower but that is okay. I use my levain once it has tripled.

4. Do 3 sets of folds 20-30 minutes apart and leave to double. This took 5.5 to 6 hours. The wholewheat instead of the rye does slow things down. Or it just might be because it is much colder here... who knows. The dough will be ready when it is ready.

5. Divide into 729 g boules, pre-shape, let rest 15 minutes and do a tight final shape. I then put them in bannetons, covered them and then put into the fridge to proof for ~10 hours.

6. The next morning bake as usual in Dutch ovens for 25 minutes at 450F, uncover and then at 425F for 22 minutes. 

They smell fabulous! Unfortunately, they are all promised to other people, I even had to give away the loaf that I was saving for us so no crumb shot unless one of my friends sends one to me. 

 

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Danni3ll3

Like Bread1965, I have been collecting the left over levain from my bakes because I just couldn’t justify throwing out perfectly good starter. I didn’t feel like making waffles or pancakes and I had done a bit of research on using Starter in bread dough without refreshing it. I also took a peek at FWSY for how much yeast to use in a hybrid dough. So armed with that info, I came up with a recipe.

Then in the middle of it, I read Bread1965’s post and had a mild heart attack when he said he threw his batch out because it was overly sour. I did taste the raw dough to make sure it wasn’t too sour. It actually had a very mild tang. I wonder if this was because I tend to use my Levain as soon as it tripled which it does in 3-4 hours. So the leftover Levain is still very young. 

Anyhow, it all turned out just fine. And it tastes more than fine too. We had some for dinner. Here is the recipe:

1. Autolyse 600 g unbleached flour, 302 g multigrain flour, 50 g ground flax with 600 g water. Let sit for an hour. 

2. Add 410 g unfed levain at 80% hydration, 30 g yogourt, 1/2 tsp yeast and 22 g salt. Mix well using pinch and fold. 

3. Ferment doing 4 sets of folds every half hour and then let rise till double. 

4. Divide into 3 small loaves, preshape, rest 15 minutes, shape tightly and place into bannetons. Cover bannetons and out to proof in the fridge for 12-14 hours. 

5. Preheat oven to 475 F with Dutch ovens inside. Drop loaves into pots lined with rounds of parchment paper. Bake covered  25 minutes at 450 F, uncover pots and bake a further 22 minutes at 425 F. 

I found that making only 3 loaves this weekend was a piece of cake when I usually make 12 (I took a break from baking for my friends).  Not having add-ins to fuss with was also kind of nice! I also know that I can collect my left over Levain and make bread with it that is quite tasty.  

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Danni3ll3

Thanks to everyone's input, my second shot at this bake turned out much better. I might have underproofed the loaves a bit but at least, I got decent if not great oven spring. Here is the changed recipe:

1. Toast 100 g of buckwheat groats. Cover with hot water and let soak for an hour. Drain. Add 50 g of yogurt. 

2. Autolyse the above with 650 unbleached flour, 50 g of freshly milled buckwheat flour, 252 g of freshly milled Selkirk wheat, 50 g fresh ground flax seeds, 70 g of diced dried apples, 75 g of diced dried organic apricots, and 625 g of water. In the end, I think I could have added another 25 g of water but I was very conservative due to my previous disaster.

3. After a couple of hours, I added 266 g of 84% hydration 4-stage levain and 22 g of salt as well as 30 g of water. The dough felt much better. I did add a bit more water with my hand as I was pinching and folding.

4. I did four sets of folds about 30 minutes apart and then let rise until double.

5. Once doubled, I divided it into portions of 795 g and did a pre-shape. I let rest 15 minutes, did a final shape and put into the bannetons. The dough was easy to handle and didn't stick at all. My usual work surface is out for repairs/replacement so I used my granite counter. I must say that I almost preferred shaping on the granite rather than the maple butcher block island. 

6. The dough was placed into the fridge to proof. 10 hours later, I took it out of the fridge and noted that it could have risen a bit more but due to tight timelines, they went into the oven anyhow. 

7. I baked as usual in Dutch ovens... 25 minutes at 450 F and 25 minutes at 425 F. The second batch had about a half hour out of the fridge and ended up looking a bit better. What I  mean by that is that the crevasses on the second batch weren't as deep.

I will get a crumb shot when I cut into the loaf.

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Danni3ll3

This is a repeat of last week’s bread without the cranberries or pumpkin seeds. Bread1965, have no fear, I made you one with the add-ins unless you prefer one without. Let me know. :-D

Here is the recipe again so you don’t have to go searching for it. 

1. Toast 125 g of large flake oats in a dry frying pan. When toasted add 25 g of oat bran to the oats.

2. Mix together 345 g of water and 75 g of organic plain yogurt. 

3. Pour 3/4 of the water/yogurt mixture into the oats and cook on medium heat until water is absorbed. Add the remainder of the water/yogurt mixture and cook on low heat until creamy. Cool until just warm.

4. In a large bowl, place 650 g of unbleached flour, 302 g of freshly milled spelt flour, 50 g of freshly ground flax seed, all of the oat porridge, 50 g of honey and 550 g of filtered water. Mix well and let the mixture sit for a couple of hours.

5. Add 22 g of sea salt and 266 g of 80% levain. Mine triples in less than 4 hours. Mix in well using folding and pinching until you see some gluten development which takes about 5 minutes.

6. Let rest 45 minutes and do a set of folds. Repeat two more times and then let sit in a warm place until it has doubled. 

7. Divide into portions of ~830 g and do a loose pre-shape. Let rest 10-15 minutes and then shape tightly into a boule. Place boules seam side down in rice/unbleached floured bannetons (sprinkle some raw oats flakes for decoration in bottom of bannetons before placing boules) and cover with a plastic shower cap or bowl cover. Place into fridge overnight (10-12 hours).

8. Heat oven and Dutch ovens to 475 F for at least 45 minutes. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of the pots and put the loaves seam side up directly out of the fridge into the pots. No need to score! Bake at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove lids, drop temperature to 425 F and bake a further 25 minutes.

Let cool and enjoy!

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Danni3ll3

I am continuing my exploration of true porridge breads and for Canadian Thanksgiving, I decided to add pumpkin seeds and cranberries to the basic loaf. I did make one batch without the cranberries and pumpkin seeds to take to my brother's house tomorrow and it turned out wonderful so the cranberries and the pumpkin seeds are optional. You could actually add any type of add-in that doesn't require soaking or doesn't absorb too much moisture from the dough such as sprouts, sunflower seeds, nuts or dried fruit.

1. Toast 125 g of large flake oats. When toasted add 25 g of oat bran to the oats.

2. Mix together 345 g of water and 75 g of organic plain yogurt. 

3. Pour 3/4 of the water/yogurt mixture into the oats and cook on medium heat until water is absorbed. Add the remainder of the water/yogurt mixture and cook on low heat until creamy. Cool until just warm.

4. In a large bowl, place 650 g of unbleached flour, 302 g of freshly milled spelt flour, 50 g of freshly ground flax seed, 75 g of dried cranberries (optional), 75 g of pumpkin seeds (optional and these could be toasted as well), all of the oat porridge, 50 g of honey and 550 g of filtered water. Mix well and let the mixture sit for a couple of hours.

5. Add 22 g of sea salt and 266 g of 80% 4-stage levain. (My levain is all freshly milled rye for the first 3 stages and 1/4 rye and 3/4 unbleached flour for the last stage. The first 3 stages are about 12 hours apart and the last stage takes less than 4 hours to triple.) Mix in well using folding and pinching until you see some gluten development which takes about 5 minutes.

6. Let rest 45 minutes and do a set of folds. Repeat two more times and then let sit in a warm place until it has doubled. You can use the fridge to slow it down if needed.

7. Divide into portions of ~880 g and do a loose pre-shape. Let rest 10-15 minutes and then shape tightly into a boule. Place boules in rice/unbleached floured bannetons and cover with a plastic shower cap or bowl cover. Place into fridge overnight (10-12 hours).

8. Heat oven and Dutch ovens to 475 F for at least 45 minutes. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of the pots and put the loaves directly out of the fridge into the pots. Bake at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove lids, drop temperature to 425 F and bake a further 25 minutes.

9. Let cool completely before placing into a plastic bag for storage. I find that plastic seems to work best for me in keeping the crumb moist and the crust soft. I have family and friends that complain about a too crunchy crust (rolling my eyes here). 

The loaf below is one of the ones without the add-ins. The others with the add-ins are all for other people.

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Danni3ll3

I must admit that there is something special about making “true“ porridge breads. The loaves sure seem to stay fresh longer and the crumb is incredibly soft. After making loaves using this method for a second week, I found that it isn’t too onerous if I do all the the porridge for my 12 loaves all at once. Then I divide the porridge by four to add it to the four batches I make (each batch makes 3 loaves). I am very pleased on how this turned out!

I forgot to toast the Kamut flakes but this is definitely an option if one wishes. 

1. Mix 345 g of water with 75 g plain yogurt. I use a local organic yogurt. Add 3/4 of this mixture to 150 g of Kamut flakes and cook until water mixture is absorbed. Remove from heat. Add remaining water mixture, and let sit until cooled. 

2. Autolyse the above with 650 g unbleached flour, 302 g freshly milled Kamut flour, 50 g freshl’y ground flax seeds, 50 g honey and 600 g water. Let sit for a couple of hours. 

3. Mix in 22 g sea salt and 266 g of 80% rye/unbleached flour levain. The levain is a 4 stage levain. I mix everything well by hand until everything is well integrated and I see some gluten development. 

4. Do 3 sets of folds about 30 minutes apart and let rise till double. This week again, the dough had to take a side trip to the fridge so I could get my daily walk in. When I got back, I took the dough out and let it finish rising till double. 

5. Divide into portion of about 840 g and preshape into a loose boule. Let rest for a bit and then shape tightly into a boule. Place into rice/unbleached floured bannetons seam side down and cover. 

6. Place in cold fridge to proof overnight. 10-12 hours seems to be the sweet spot for me. 

7. The next morning, preheat oven and pots to 375 F for at least 45 minutes. Put parchment paper rounds in bottom of pots and place loaves seam side up in hot pots. Bake covered at 450 F for 35 minutes, remove lids and bake a further 25 minutes at 435 F. 

Makes 3 fantastically tasting boules. 

 

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Danni3ll3

I made up this recipe using a true cooked porridge method rather than a soaker which is my usual method when using porridge grains. I followed the method outlined by Ian and Laurie. To be honest, I am not sure that the results are worth the extra pain in the neck especially when making 4 batches of this. The crumb seems to be softer and hold more moisture but I should try this as a soaker as well. Unfortunately, I don't have enough of the 12 grain cereal I used to repeat this using a soaker. Anyhow, on to the recipe:

1. Toast 150 g of Daybreak Mills 12 grain cereal in a dry frying pan. 

2. Mix 345 g of water with 75 g of organic plain yogurt. Cook toasted 12 grain cereal in 3/4 of the water mixture until creamy and grains are al dente. 

3. Add the remaining water mixture to the porridge as well as 100 g of dried cranberries. Let soak overnight.

4. Autolyse all the above with 550 of unbleached flour, 202 g of multigrain flour, 200 g of freshly milled einkorn, 50 g of freshly ground flax seed and 555 g of water. Mix well and let sit for about an hour.

5. Add in 22 g of salt, 266 g of 80% levain and 20 g of water. Use the pinch and fold method until everything is well integrated and there is some gluten development.

6. Do 3 sets of folds 45 minutes apart and let rise until double. To be honest here, there was a slight detour to the fridge when I had to meet friends for a walk. When I got back, I let it finish rising which only took a few minutes. I actually like the little trip to the fridge because it makes the next steps much easier.

7. Divide into 3 loaves, shape loosely and let rest for 15 minutes. Reshape tightly and put into rice floured bannetons seam side down. Cover bannetons with plastic bowl covers and put into cold fridge for the night (~10 hours). In this case, because of the little side trip to the fridge earlier, I let the loaves sit on the counter for about a half hour to give the proofing a bit of a kick start.

8. The next morning, preheat the oven and the dutch ovens to 475 F. This usually takes at least 45 minutes. Load the loaves seam side up and bake covered at 450 F for 25 minutes. Remove the lids and bake at 425 F for a further 25 minutes.

9. Let cool and enjoy!

Crumb shots:

This was delicious! I might add a bit of honey to it next time.!

 

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Danni3ll3

I want to thank Flour.ish.en for the inspiration for this one. The herbes de Provence that I bought have a bit of lavender so it has a nice little zing to it. I am super happy with the crumb on this one considering the amount of add-ins in it.

This recipe makes 3 small loaves. Recipe:

1. Toast 60 g of sunflower seeds and 115 g of walnuts in a dry frying pan. Cool.

2. Mix together 75 g dark olives, 75 g green olives, 2 tsp herbes de Provence, zest of one lemon, 650 g unbleached flour, 200 g multigrain flour, 102 g fresh milled einkorn, 50 g freshly ground flax seed as well as the walnuts and the sunflower seeds. Add 700 g of water, mix well, and let sit for about an hour or so.

3. Add 30 g plain full fat yogurt, 20 g of sea salt and 266 g of 80% four stage levain. I use folding and pinching to integrate everything well.

4. Do 3 sets of folds about 30-45 minutes apart and let rise in a warm place (82F) until double. I had to run out so there was a little side trip to the fridge to slow it down till I was ready to deal with it.

5. Divide into ~780 g loaves and pre-shape. Let rest 15 minutes and do a final shape. The dough being cold was surprisingly easy to shape. The loaves went into rice floured bannetons and were covered by plastic bowl covers.

6. I let the bannetons sit out on the counter for about an hour and half (because the dough was cold and I wanted to give a kick start to the proofing) and then put them in the fridge for the night. After 8 hours in the fridge, the loaves were nicely proofed and they were baked in a pre-heated 475 F oven in dutch ovens. Immediately after loading the oven, drop the temp to 450 F and bade for 25 minutes. Remove lids and drop the temperature to 425 F. Bake for a further 22 minutes.

I encourage everyone to give Flour.ish.en's recipe a try. The results are delicious!

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Danni3ll3

This is the same recipe as the Olive, Sun-dried Tomato, Feta without the add-ins. We needed some simple bread for sandwiches and I tested out my base recipe to see what came out of it without all the flavour enhancements that I usually put in. It came out delicious but the crust was a bit tough as I didn't add in any yogurt. If I had any doubts that 30-50 g of yogurt made much of a difference in the tenderness of the crust, well this certainly answered it. The yogurt is definitely needed!

So here is the base recipe:

1. Autolyse 705 g of water, 550 g of unbleached flour, 200 g of multigrain flour, 202 g of freshly milled Selkirk wheat flour and 50 g of freshly ground flax. Let sit for a couple of hours.

2. Mix in 22 g salt, 266 g of 80% hydration levain and 10 g of water. Use pinching and folding to integrate well.

3. Do 3 sets of folds 30 to 45 minutes apart and let rise until double. 

4. Divide into 3 portions, pre-shape loosely into boules, let rest 10-15 minutes and shape tightly into boules. Place in rice/unbleached floured bannetons, cover and put into fridge for 10-12 hours.

5. The next morning, heat up the oven and the dutch ovens to 475 F. Load the boules into the dutch ovens lined with parchment paper rounds and bake covered at 450 F for 25 minutes. Remove lids and bake a further 22 minutes at 425 F. 

I am very happy with the look of the crumb and the flavour is delicious! Perfect for a grilled cheese sandwich at dinner time!

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Danni3ll3

It was time to do a repeat of this particular loaf. The recipe is very slightly tweaked from my original version.

1. Chop 100 g of Kalamata olives, 50 g of sun-dried tomatoes in oil and 100 g of feta. Add in 1/4 tsp of dried thyme and 2 tsps of dried oregano.

2. Autolyse all of the above with 705 g of water, 550 g of unbleached flour, 200 g of multigrain flour, 202 g of freshly milled Selkirk wheat flour and 50 g of freshly ground flax. Let sit for a couple of hours.

3. Mix in 21 g salt, 266 g of 80% hydration levain and 10 g of water. Use pinching and folding to integrate well.

4. Do 3 sets of folds 30 to 45 minutes apart and let rise until double. This took forever (~7 hours) because my kitchen was cool and my usual warm spot (oven with the light on and the door cracked open) was in use by the daughter.

5. Divide into 3 portions, pre-shape loosely into boules, let rest 10-15 minutes and shape tightly into boules. Place in rice/unbleached floured bannetons, cover and put into fridge for 10-12 hours.

6. The next morning, heat up the oven and the dutch ovens to 475 F. Load the boules into the dutch ovens lined with parchment paper rounds and bake covered at 450 F for 25 minutes. Remove lids and bake a further 22 minutes at 425 F. 

I haven't cut into our loaf yet but my friends who bought loaves are telling me that it is delicious!

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