The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Danni3ll3

Just a simple loaf. 

 

 

Recipe:

 Makes 3 loaves

 

125 g fresh milled spelt flour (125 g Spelt berries)

125 g fresh milled rye flour  (125 g rye berries)

125 g fresh milled Kamut flour (125 g Kamut berries)

700 g unbleached strong bakers flour

50 g freshly ground flax (50 g flax seeds)

800 g filtered water

24 g Himalayan pink salt

30 g local yogurt

250 g 100% hydration levain (procedure for this is in recipe)

Extra whole grain and unbleached flour to feed levain 

Spelt and Kamut flakes for the top of the loaves

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 50 g of wholegrain flour as well as 50g of strong baker’s flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 
  2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill the grain on the finest setting of your mill or measure out commercial whole grain flour of the various grains if you don’t mill your own.
  2. Place the required amount of each freshly milled flour in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  3. Grind the flax seeds and add to the flours. 
  4. Cover and set aside. 

 

Dough making day:

  1. When ready to make the dough, take the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.
  2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flours, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 
  3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes. 
  4. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  5. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. This dough moved very slowly. It was another 2 hours and 15 minutes after the last coil fold before it barely reached a 30% rise! Interesting how the weather outside affects the dough even when I put the dough in a warm spot. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~740 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  8. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Add Spelt and Kamut flakes if you wish. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

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Danni3ll3

I was looking through cookbooks for inspiration and found this recipe in Vanessa Kimbell’s The Sourdough School - The ground-breaking guide to making gut-friendly bread. I altered the ingredient list slightly by adding yogurt and changing the hydration. She uses a whopping 83% so I reduced the water since I really didn’t feel like dealing with goop. My final hydration was 73%. However, this doesn’t account for the water/beer retained in the spent grains. I also increased the salt and the levain slightly, and used my usual dough making procedure.

 

 

As to finding the spent beer malted grains, I sent a message to the local brewery that provided the stout for last week’s bread, and they let me have spent grains at no charge! Bonus!!! Since I have a couple extra loaves this week, I think I’ll drop off a loaf as a thank you. 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Dough:

700 g strong bakers unbleached flour

300 g fresh milled Einkorn (300 g Einkorn berries)

700 g water

30 g yogurt 

22 g salt

200 g spent beer malted grains (Sleeping Giant Brewery)

200 g sultanas 

250 g of 3 stage 100% hydration levain (procedure below)

Wholegrain flour as well as unbleached flour to feed the levain

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 50 g of wholegrain flour as well as 50g of strong baker’s flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 
  2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill the Einkorn berries on the finest setting of your mill or measure out ready bought whole grain Einkorn flour if you don’t mill your own.
  2. Place the required amount of the Einkorn flour in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  3. Cover and set aside.
  4. Measure the spent grains and sultanas. Mix together and refrigerate.

 

Dough making day:

  1. When ready to make the dough, take the spent grains/sultanas mixture and the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.
  2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flours, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 
  3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes.  
  4. Add the spent grains and sultanas to the mixing bowl, and mix on speed 2 until they are evenly distributed. This will take a couple of minutes. 
  5. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  6. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. This particular dough rose quite quickly and was ready 45 minutes after the last coil fold. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~800 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  9. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

They baked up nice and dark! 

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Danni3ll3

Sleeping Giant Brewery is one of our very successful local breweries. So when it turned out that the stout I used in this recipe last April, was no longer available, it was a no brainer to support our local brewery. Hopefully, this tastes as good as the last time!

 

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

Soaker

180 g oats

200 g stout beer (Sleeping Giant Skull Rock Stout)

 

Dough

720 g Unbleached flour 

200 g freshly milled Selkirk wheat flour (200 g Selkirk wheat berries)

100 g freshly milled Einkorn flour (100 g Einkorn wheat berries)

600 g water 

100 g stout beer (Sleeping Giant Skull Rock Stout)

24 g Pink Himalayan salt 

30 g yogurt

250 g Levain (procedure in recipe)

125 g 2 Year Old White Cheddar, finely cubed 

Extra whole grain flour (I used einkorn and kamut) and unbleached flour to feed the levain

 

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of strong baker’s flour and let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 
  2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. I mill my own wholegrain flour so if you are doing the same, measure out the stated amount for each type of flour in berries or grain, and mill it on the finest setting of your home mill. If buying flour, get the freshest that you can and try to ensure that it is wholegrain. 
  2. Place the required amounts of the wholegrain flours in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  3. Cover and set aside.
  4. Cut the cheese into very small pieces, sprinkle with a bit of flour, toss and place covered into the fridge. Tip: If you sprinkle the flour on the cheese before chopping it, it makes it stick less to itself. 

 

Dough making day:

  1. Take the levain out of the fridge to warm up on the counter. I usually give it a stir to redistribute the beasties and give them access to more food. 
  2. In a stand mixer’s bowl, add the water, the second amount of stout beer and the flours. Mix on the lowest speed until you have a shaggy dough with no dry spots. This takes a couple of minutes. 
  3. Autolyse for a couple of hours at room temperature. 
  4. Mix the soaker together and cover. Let rest on the counter.
  5. Once the levain is ready, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed up for 9 minutes. 
  6. Then add the cheese cubes and the soaker, and mix for another minute or two.
  7. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  8. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 
  9. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~830 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  10. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  11. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Amazing oven spring! Loaves hit the lid while baking! So we have flat tops! 😂

All loaves are spoken for so no crumb shot or taste notes. 

 

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Danni3ll3

 This is a popular loaf for Canadian Thanksgiving. 

 

 

For this batch, I adapted my levain building procedure to have 1:2:2 ratio at each build. Reading a few recent posts about feeding ratios prompted me to try this as my levain often has a bit of acetone smell at its peak which might mean it’s starving. With the 1:2:2 ratio, I didn’t notice that smell but I also didn’t find that it rose any faster. It still took 6 hours to come close to double on the last build before I put it in the fridge. By the way, thank you to those (Dabrownman and Ian if I remember right) that do refrigerate the last build before using it. It is really convenient to be able to use the levain when I want it rather than waiting hours for it to be ready. Much easier to time the autolyse this way!

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Dough:

700 g strong bakers unbleached flour

200 g fresh milled Kamut 

100 g fresh milled Einkorn

75 g dry Wild Rice (~168 g cooked)

150 g dried cranberries 

700 g water

30 g yogurt 

30 g honey

22 g salt

250 g of 3 stage 100% hydration levain (procedure below)

Rye flour (or any other wholegrain flour) to feed the levain

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain rye flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain rye flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of strong baker’s flour and let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 
  2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. I use homemilled flour so if you are doing the same, measure out the stated amount for each type of flour in berries or grain, and mill it on the finest setting of your home mill. If buying flour, get the freshest that you can and try to ensure that it is wholegrain. 
  2. Place the required amounts of the wholegrain flours in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  3. Cover and set aside.
  4. Cook the wild rice in plenty of boiling water until tender. This took an hour. Drain, add the dried cranberries, mix well, and refrigerate overnight.

 

Dough making day:

  1. When ready to make the dough, take the wild rice and the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.
  2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flour, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 
  3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, the honey, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes.  
  4. Add the cooked wild rice and cranberries to the mixing bowl, and mix on speed 2 until they are evenly distributed. This should only take a minute or two.
  5. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  6. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~780 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  9. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 I am quite happy with these loaves. Nice oven spring and beautiful colour. I probably won’t get a crumb shot as they are all promised to other people. 

 

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Danni3ll3

 

A friend requested a loaf with honey and oat porridge. So this is it!

 

Recipe 

 

Makes 3 loaves 

 

Porridge 

100 g rolled oats

200 g water

45 g honey

40 g butter

 

Add-ins

75 g raw Sesame seeds 

 

Dough

700 g unbleached flour

200 g whole grain Red Fife flour 

160 g whole grain Einkorn flour

68 g flax, freshly ground

700 g water + 25 g

23 g salt

30 g yogurt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Extra wholegrain flour of your choice for feeding the levain

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of strong baker’s flour and let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill the Red Fife and  Einkorn berries. Place the required amounts in a tub. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. 
  2. Grind the flax seeds in a bullet and add to the flours in the tub. Cover and set aside.
  3. Make the porridge: Add the water to the rolled oats and cook on low until water is absorbed and porridge is creamy. Add the butter and the honey. Stir well and put into the fridge for the night. This can be done in the morning if you wish. I got lazy and prepared my porridge in the morning. 
  4. Toast the sesame seeds in a dry frying pan or in the oven at 350 F. They are done when lightly golden and fragrant. Reserve.

 

Dough Making day:

  1. Early in the morning, take out the levain and the porridge to warm up.
  2. Put 700 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Autolyse for at least a couple of hours at room temperature. 
  3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt , the extra water, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 8 minutes. At the end of the 8 minutes, add the toasted sesame seeds and the porridge and mix til incorporated.
  4. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  5. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~870 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and cross over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  8. Sprinkle a  mix of rice flour and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 

Oops! Got great oven spring, tops hit the lid and I have flat topped loaves! Need to remember to cut back on this recipe or use bigger Dutch ovens. 

 


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Danni3ll3

 

While looking through the kitchen pantry for inspiration, I came across a bag of Wild Blend Rice made by Lundberg. So I log in to The Fresh Loaf looking for a recipe that uses rice and onions. What do I find? A recipe that I created last November using those very ingredients! 🤦‍♀️Of course, in this version, I had to tweak a few ingredients and the method. I also changed my usual timing of the Levain due to a family birthday party. 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Dough:

700 g strong bakers unbleached flour

200 g fresh milled Kamut 

100 g fresh milled Einkorn

85 g dry Lundberg Wild Blend Rice (~240 g cooked)

20 g dehydrated onions flakes

700 g water

30 g yogurt 

50 g honey

24 g salt

250 g of 3 stage 100% hydration levain (procedure below)

Rye flour (or any other wholegrain flour) to feed the levain

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of wholegrain rye flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g of wholegrain rye flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of strong baker’s flour and let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 
  2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. I use homemilled flour so if you are doing the same, measure out the stated amount for each type of flour in berries or grain, and mill it on the finest setting of your home mill. If buying flour, get the freshest that you can and try to ensure that it is wholegrain. 
  2. Place the required amounts of the wholegrain flours in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  3. Cover and set aside.
  4. Cook the rice in plenty of boiling water until tender. Drain, add the dehydrated onions, mix well, and refrigerate overnight.

 

Dough making day:

  1. When you get up, take the rice and the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.
  2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flour, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 
  3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, the honey, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes.  
  4. Add the cooked rice and onions to the mixing bowl, and mix on speed 2 until they are evenly distributed. This should only take a minute or two.
  5. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  6. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~775 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  9. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 

These went into the fridge at 4 pm. I got up at 5 am to bake these due to another family commitment (photo shoot at the barn). I don’t usually do early mornings. I think I’m dying!

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Danni3ll3

It was time to throw some seeds into some bread again. I checked out my previous methods on adding seeds and decided to go with a dry seed addition rather than using a soaker. It seems that I got a more open crumb doing this rather than doing the soaker. Hopefully, this holds true.

 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Seed Add-ins

70 g Sunflower seeds

50 g Sesame seeds (I used half black and half white)

50 g freshly ground flax seeds

30 g Amaranth seeds

30 g Buckwheat groats

15 g Millet seeds

15 g Hemp hearts

 

Main dough

600 g strong baker’s unbleached flour

150 g wholegrain Durum flour 

150 g wholegrain Kamut flour 

100 g wholegrain Rye flour 

800 g water

23 g Pink Himalayan salt

30 g plain yogurt

250 g levain (Procedure in recipe)

Extra wholegrain rye flour for levain builds

 

Mid afternoon the day before:

  1. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of wholegrain rye flour. Let rise in a warm place. 
  2. I use homemilled flour so if you are doing the same, measure out the stated amount for each type of flour in berries or grain, and mill it on the finest setting of your home mill. If buying flour, get the freshest that you can and try to ensure that it is wholegrain. By the way, if you can’t get Durum flour or Kamut flour, they can be replaced with whole wheat flour. You could even sub in Spelt flour for either the Durum or the Kamut.
  3. Place the required amounts of the wholegrain flours in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  4. Cover and set aside.

The night before:

  1. Toast all the seeds except for the ground flax either in the oven or in a dry frying pan until fragrant. Be careful not to burn them. Cool, add the ground flax, and set aside.
  2. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g of wholegrain rye flour. Let that rest in a warm spot overnight.

Dough making day:

  1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of strong baker’s flour and let rise until double in a warm spot. This took 6 hours.
  2. A couple of hours before the levain is ready, mix the water with the flour, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse until the Levain has doubled. 
  3. Once the levain is ready, add the salt, the yogurt and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute or two to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes.  
  4. Add the toasted seeds and mix on speed 2 until they are evenly distributed. This should only take a minute or two.
  5. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes. 
  6. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 30%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~780g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  9. Sprinkle rice flour, then extra sunflower seeds and sesame seeds in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 

Oven spring was not too bad for a dough with that many seeds in it. 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Back to baking after 3 weeks off. I made David’s bread following his recipe exactly aside from fresh milled flour and the addition of 30 g yogurt. Here is the link: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/59782/todays-bake-3312019#comment-435200

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I revisited this upon request from one of my customers. I changed up some of the grains (Spelt and Kamut instead of Durum), added extra feta and Sundried tomatoes, and decided to go with a longer mixing time rather than sifting and soaking the bran. This last part made for a slightly more streamlined procedure. Hopefully it pays off. 

 

Recipe

Note: I mill more grain berries than needed in order to have extra to feed the levain builds. So add extra grain berries to the amounts listed below unless you have other wholegrain flours handy to use. 

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

150 g Spelt flour (~155 g Spelt berries)

150 g Kamut flour (~155 g Kamut berries)

50 g of rye flour (~55 g Rye berries)

700 g of unbleached flour

725 g of filtered water 

10 g Old Bay seasoning

15 g Pink Himalayan salt 

30 g yogurt 

250 g levain (procedure is in recipe and will need additional wholewheat flour and unbleached flour)

 

Add-ins

143 g of drained sliced mixed olives (49 g Kalamata, 48 g Manzanilla and 46 g Black) or (375 ml jars or cans of each type)

94 g crumbled Feta (Who knew that a 90 g pkg yielded 94 g! 🤔)

72 g Seasoned Sun-dried Tomatoes in oil, drained and oil reserved (2-270 ml jars)

 

The afternoon before:

  1. Take 18 g of your refrigerated starter and add 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of wholegrain flour (your choice- I used mostly rye). Let rise in a warm place (oven with the light on - ~82F).
  2. Mill the grains on the finest setting of your mill. Measure the Spelt, Kamut, and rye flours and place in a tub. Save any leftover flour to feed the levain.  
  3. Add the unbleached flour to the milled flours and reserve.

The night before:

  1. Feed the levain 36 g of filtered water and 36 g of wholegrain flour. Let rise overnight in a warm place. 

Dough making day:

  1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of unbleached flour. Let rise in a warm place till double. This took about 5 hours.
  2. Measure the feta, crumble if needed, and set aside.
  3. Drain (save the oil) and weigh the sun-dried tomatoes, (slice if not sliced), measure out 25 g of the reserved oil, and add both to the feta. 
  4. Drain the olives, weigh, and add to the feta mix.
  5. 2 hours or so before the levain is ready, mix the water with the flours and autolyse. This takes a minute or two in a mixer. Let autolyse for at least a couple of hours.
  6. Once the levain is ready, add the Old Bay seasoning, the salt, the yogurt, and the levain. Mix for a minute on low until the levain is integrated, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes to develop the gluten.
  7. Add the feta, the olives, and the sun-dried tomatoes/oil mix gradually to the bowl. Continue mixing on speed 2 until the add-ins are evenly distributed throughout the dough. Cover and let rest 30 minutes.
  8. Do 2 sets of folds at 30 minute intervals, then do two sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minutes intervals. Let rise for another hour or so until you see lots of small irregular bubbles through the wall of your container. The dough should have risen about 30% and be quite billowy.
  9. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~800g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  10. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  11. Sprinkle rice flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

They smell awesome! My streamlined process doesn’t look like it impacted the oven spring negatively. Crumb when we cut into one!

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

This was a change from my usual routine as I made only one batch of dough! It’s a long weekend and I got orders for only 2 loaves. This turned out to be a good thing since my daughter ran her trial half marathon and I biked behind her to keep her company. Some celebrating and having to go back to the starting point ate up more time than planned as did a side trip to the Farmers Market. Therefore bread making was quite delayed. Making one batch was a nice change. 

This week’s bread is Einkorn with barley porridge. I thought that barley would go nicely with the Einkorn and it turns out that both were grown in Ancient Egypt so that’s how I came up with the name. 😊

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

Porridge:

75 g barley flakes

150 g water 

 

Dough:

675 g strong bakers unbleached flour

300 g high extraction Einkorn flour (315 g Einkorn berries)

575 g filtered water + 50 g 

22 g salt

30 g yogurt 

250 g levain (procedure in recipe) 

 

The afternoon before:

  1. Mill the Einkorn berries for the main dough and sift to obtain the needed amount of high extraction flour. Place the required amount in a tub. Save the bran for dusting the bannetons. Reserve any leftover high extraction flour for feeding the Levain in the evening and the next day. I had very little left over. 
  2. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. Cover and reserve. 
  3. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g whole grain flour (whatever you have on hand). Let rise in a warm place. 

The night before:

  1. Add the water to the barley flakes and cook on low until quite thick and all the water has been absorbed. I ended up with 221 g of porridge. Cover and put into the fridge for the night. This can be done in the morning if you wish.
  2. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g whole grain flour. Let that rest in a warm spot overnight.

Dough Making day:

  1. The next day, feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of AP flour and let rise 3-4 hours in a warm spot. My warm spot is the oven with the door cracked open and the lights on. I get an ambient temperature of around 82F. Mine doubled in 3 hours. 
  2. One hour after feeding the levain, put the filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes and makes a very stiff dough. Cover and autolyse for 2 -3 hours at room temperature (73F). Because the levain matured so quickly, I only autolysed for 2 hours. 
  3. At the same time, remove the porridge from the fridge and let it warm up to room temperature.
  4. Once the levain is ready, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the dough. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 4 minutes. I reduced the mixing time because I read that Einkorn doesn’t like to be over mixed. 
  5. Add the porridge and extra water, and mix for another minute or two until well distributed.
  6. Remove dough from bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest in a warm spot to begin bulk fermentation.
  7. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise about 30 %. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. This was one hour after the last fold for this particular dough. 
  8. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~715 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let it rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  9. Do a final shape by flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  10. Sprinkle some Einkorn bran and barley flakes in the bannetons. If your bannetons are not well seasoned, sprinkle rice flour first, then the bran and the barley. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl covers or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. My total proof time was 12 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for an hour. 
  2. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  3. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

I got really good oven spring. The boules might have been slightly underproofed, which I suspected might happen since I only had three loaves in the fridge rather than 12, and that would cause the 3 to cool down more quickly. A bit more of counter time before retarding might be a good idea. 

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