The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Danni3ll3's blog

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Danni3ll3

The local dairy that I get my yogurt from is slowly expanding their products and the latest is a hard Herb Cheese. 

 It is actually fairly strong tasting and the thyme really comes through. I thought it would be perfect with some roasted garlic and sun dried tomatoes. So here goes:

 

Makes 3 loaves. 

 

Levain:

63 g starter

63 g water

110 g unbleached flour

15 g freshly milled Rye flour

 

Dough:

750 g strong bakers unbleached flour

100 g freshly milled Kamut flour

100 g freshly milled Spelt flour

50 g freshly milled Rye flour

800 g filtered water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g Slate River yogurt

250 g levain from above

 

Add-ins:

82 g Roasted Garlic (4 heads)

85 g Sun dried tomatoes 

70 g Slate River Herb Cheese

 

A few days before:

  1. Get your starter up to speed by feeding it two or three times. I fed mine 3 times with rye and unbleached flour. 
  2. Oops! I forgot so I ended up feeding it only two nights before and sped it up by keeping it in a very warm place. 

 

Two nights before:

  1. Mix the starter with the water and then add the flours. Let ferment at room temperature (70 F or so) for 12 hours. Refrigerate until the morning of making the dough. 
  2. Well that was the plan. 🙄Unfortunately I forgot and did this the night before. So it didn’t get any refrigerator time. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill and measure out your flours and set aside covered.
  2. Roast the garlic and mash. (Cut off top of head, drizzle with olive oil, cover with foil and roast at 400 F for 45 minutes.)
  3. Chop sun-dried tomatoes, unless you get lucky like me and have the daughter find them already chopped. 😁Set aside. 
  4. Grate Herb Cheese. 
  5. Refrigerate garlic and cheese. 

 

Dough making day:

  1. Remove the levain from the fridge to warm up to room temperature.
  2. Mix the flours and the water in a stand mixer and mix on low for one or two minutes until you have a shaggy dough and no dry flour. Let autolyse for a couple of hours.
  3. Remove add-ins from fridge to bring to room temperature. 
  4. Add the salt, the yogurt and the starter in chunks. Mix on low for 1 minute to mix the ingredients and then mix on the next speed up for 9 minutes to develop the gluten.
  5. Add the add-ins gradually and mix for a minute or two to distribute them throughout the dough.
  6. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and cover. Place in a warm spot (82 F-My warm spot is my oven with the lights on and the door cracked open) and let ferment for 4 hours with two sets of stretches and folds at 50 and 100 minutes. My dough rose about 50% by the end of bulk fermentation. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~775g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  9. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons. Cover and let sit for 15 minutes, then refrigerate for at least 12 hours. Mine were in the fridge for 16 hours. 

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough, seam side up, inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

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Danni3ll3

I have quite a stock of Spelt and Kamut berries and need to use some of them up. While searching, I found this impromptu recipe that I made over the winter for my daughter so I scaled it for three loaves and tweaked the method.

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Soaker:

65 g Spelt flakes

65 g Kamut flakes

65 g Bulgur

65 g honey

260 g boiling water

 

Levain:

60 g trice refreshed sourdough starter

30 g strong bakers unbleached flour

30 g home milled rye flour

60 g of filtered water

 

Dough:

720 g strong bakers unbleached flour

155 g freshly milled Spelt flour

155 g freshly milled Kamut flour

716 g filtered water

23 g salt

30 g plain yogurt

180 g levain from above

 

The night before:

  1. Combine the ingredients for the soaker and cover overnight.
  2. Mill the individual amounts of Spelt, Kamut and Rye berries on the finest setting possible. Reserve separately. 
  3. Be sure that your starter has been refreshed a couple of times already and give it one more feeding. In the morning, you need a total of 60 g of starter.

Dough making day:

Levain

  1. Early in the morning, add the water and flours for the Levain to the starter and let sit for 4 hours.

Dough

  1. About an hour or more before the levain is ready, mix the dough flours and the water together in a stand mixer on the lowest speed for a minute or two, and then let autolyse for an hour or so.
  2. Add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain and mix for a minute on the lowest speed. Then mix on the next speed up for 9 minutes. 
  3. Then add the soaker. Mix until the soaker is well distributed. Cover the dough and let rise in a warm place. My dough temp was 77F. 
  4. After 30 minutes, give it a set of stretches and folds until it feels quite firm.  Repeat in 30 minutes. 
  5. 45 minutes after that, do another set. Then let rise until total bulk fermentation equals 4 hours. By then, I see some large bubbles on the top and the volume has expanded by about 50-60%. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~835 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can. Note that I had to move pretty fast as the dough started to get sticky the more I touched it. 
  8. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons. Cover, then refrigerate overnight.

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

For fun, after the dough was mixed I figured out the hydration including all ingredients (counted in Bulgur and flakes as part of the flour) except for the salt, allowing 80% water for the yogurt and 10 % water for the honey, and came up with 83.4% hydration! 😳No wonder it felt borderline sticky when I was shaping! 

On another note, I have been using cooking spray to oil my Cambro tubs for the autolyse and bulk fermentation. It really makes a difference for me when I am moving dough in and out of tubs to put into the mixer. I am not fighting to get every little bit out and makes clean up a breeze. Wish I had thought of this years ago!

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Danni3ll3

I had quite a few people asking me for a redo so here it is. Minor changes were using only 50g of additional water, doubling the amount of bourbon, mixing the cinnamon with the raisins before adding to the dough and bulking for only 4 hours as the dough temp was quite a bit higher with this batch. Here is my prior recipe: 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/60439/saigon-cinnamon-raisin-sourdough

 

Once again I got nice oven spring. Hopefully the crumb is as nice as last time. 

 

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Danni3ll3

I loved David’s San Francisco recipe and decided to add some seeds to it and change the flour combo. I got the inspiration for the seed mixture from a guy named Josh (JoshFox Bread) that I follow on Facebook. He has a micro bakery thing happening similar to what I do but on a larger scale. His breads always look so delectable! So between David’s recipe/method and Josh’s combo of seeds, I hope I have a winner!

 

 

Levain:

63 g starter

63 g water

110 g unbleached flour

15 g freshly milled Rye flour

 

Dough:

668 g strong bakers unbleached flour

116 g freshly milled Durum flour

116 g freshly milled Spelt flour

96 g freshly milled Rye flour

800 g filtered water

23 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g plain whole milk yogurt

 

Add-ins:

40 g toasted sesame seeds

40 g toasted sunflower seeds

40 g toasted flax seeds

40 g toasted millet

40 g toasted poppy seeds

 

A few days before:

  1. Get your starter up to speed by feeding it two or three times. I fed mine 3 times with rye and unbleached flour.

 

Two nights before:

  1. Mix the starter with the water and then add the flours. 
  2. Let ferment at room temperature (70 F or so) for 12 hours. 
  3. Refrigerate until the morning of making the dough. For me this was about 24 hours.

 

The night before:

  1. Mill and measure out your flours and set aside covered.
  2. Toast all of the add-ins in a dry frying pan. Cover and reserve.

 

Dough making day:

  1. Remove the levain from the fridge to warm up to room temperature.
  2. Mix the flours and the water in a stand mixer and mix on low for one or two minutes until you have a shaggy dough and no dry flour. Let autolyse for a couple of hours.
  3. Add the salt, the yogurt and the starter in chunks. Mix on low for 1 minute to mix the ingredients and then mix on the next speed up for 9 minutes to develop the gluten.
  4. Add the toasted seeds gradually and mix for a minute or two to distribute the seeds throughout the dough.
  5. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and cover. Place in a warm spot (82 F-My warm spot is my oven with the lights on and the door cracked open) and let ferment for 3 and a half hours with two sets of stretches and folds at 50 and 100 minutes. My dough rose about 30% by the end of bulk fermentation. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~760g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  8. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons. Cover and roof in a warm spot until dough has risen 50%. When I made this recipe the last time, the dough had risen 50% in two hours but this time, it was ready after only one. 🤗 
  9. Then refrigerate for at least 12 hours. This particular dough was retarded for 17 and a half hours.

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough, seam side up, inside. I was surprised at how light the loaves felt and hoped that they weren’t overproofed! 😳
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

I think I caught them just in time. I have ears on most of them so happy about that! 

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Danni3ll3

Alan posted delicious looking cinnamon raisin batards (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/60371/maurizios-cinnamon-raisin-levain-baguettes) so I had to jump on the bandwagon too. I scaled up the original recipe from Maurizio to make three boules of my usual size which is usually around 1100 g of flour. 

I didn’t go as far as Maurizio to make my own raisins but I certainly thought about it! Due to it being a crazy week, I went with unsulfured Thompson raisins and soaked them in some bourbon overnight. His wholewheat flour was replaced by freshly milled Red Fife wheat done on the finest setting I could get on my Komo mill. I did not sift out the bran. It took a bit to find the Saigon cinnamon but one of the local health food stores had it.

As well, I used my Kitchen Aid Pro Line mixer to mix and develop the gluten instead of using slaps and folds. When it was time to integrate the levain and the salt, I put the mixer on speed one for 1 or two minutes, then I put it on speed two for 9 minutes to develop the gluten. After the 9 minutes, I added the cinnamon and the raisins and mixed for another minute. The rest of the recipe was followed as per Maurizio’s instructions. This is the link to Maurizio’s original recipe: https://www.theperfectloaf.com/cinnamon-raisin-sourdough/

 

So here is my rescaled recipe:

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Levain:

60 g trice refreshed sourdough starter

30 g strong bakers unbleached flour

30 g home milled red fife flour

60 g of filtered water

 

Dough:

740 g strong bakers unbleached flour

300 g freshly milled red fife flour

830 g filtered water (divided into 730 g and 100 g)

22 g salt

180 g levain from above

220 g unsulfured Thompson raisins

22 g Bourbon

12 g Saigon cinnamon

 

 

The night before:

Raisins

  1. Soak the raisins in the bourbon and cover overnight.
  2. Be sure that your starter has been refreshed a couple of times already and give it one more feeding. You should have a total of 60 g of starter.
  3. Mill the required amounts of Red Fife berries on the finest setting possible. Reserve. 

Dough making day:

Levain

  1. Early in the morning, add the water and flours for the Levain to the starter and let sit for 3 to 4 hours.

Dough

  1. About an hour before the levain is ready, mix the dough flours and 730 g of the water together in a stand mixer on the lowest speed for a minute or two, and then let autolyse for an hour or so.
  2. Add the salt, part of the reserved water, and the levain and mix for a minute on the lowest speed. Then mix on the next speed up for 9 minutes. 
  3. Then add the remaining water and the cinnamon. Let that mix for 30 seconds or so and then add the soaked raisins. Mix until the raisins are fairly well distributed. Cover the dough and let rise in a warm place.
  4. After 30 minutes, give it a set of stretches and folds until it feels quite firm.  
  5. 30 minutes after that, do another set. Then let rise for another 3 or 4 hours. My dough temperature was 76 F when Maurizio called for 79F. I placed the dough in a warm spot (oven with the door cracked open and the lights on) to compensate for the cooler dough. I let it rise until I saw a number of large bubbles on top and the volume had expanded by 50%. This was an additional 4 hours and 15 minutes after the folds for this particular dough. So the total bulk was 5 hours and 15 minutes. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~775 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  8. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons. Cover, then refrigerate overnight. The loaves spent 15.5 hours in the fridge. 

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Watch that they don’t burn. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.
  3. The house smells amazing!
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Danni3ll3

I’ve been drooling over the beautiful breads that David has been producing with extended retardation and his description of “severely yummy” was very enticing. So I stayed true to his recipe and method aside from using strong bakers unbleached flour for all the white flour and adding 30 g of yogurt to tenderize the crust. The whole grain flours were freshly milled and I used Selkirk wheat berries for the whole-wheat. I did not sift out the bran as per my usual practice. The first batch was retarded 17 hours and the second batch a bit more than 18 hours. Here is the link to David’s recipe: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/59782/todays-bake-3312019#comment-435200

The loaves are super light and had really good oven spring. I can’t wait to see the crumb and taste it. 

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Danni3ll3

I had a huge bag of apricots and decided to use them in a bread. Maybe I shouldn’t have bothered. 🙄 I remember another time using apricots and the loaves bombing. 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves 

 

Soaker

125 g Rolled Oats

250 g Boiling Water

 

Dough

800 g Unbleached Flour 

200 g High extraction Spelt Flour (230 g Spelt berries)

540 g Water + 50 g

22 g Salt 

30 g Yogurt

250 g Levain

100 g Pecans (chopped)

150 g Dried Apricots (chopped and a tsp of flour addd to prevent sticking)

 

Mid afternoon the day before:

  1. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of bran or wholewheat flour. Let rise in a warm place. 
  2. Mill the Spelt berries and sift to obtain the needed amount of high extraction flour. Save the bran for the levain or another use. 
  3. Place 200 g of the high extraction flour in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. Cover and set aside.

The night before:

  1. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g of AP flour flour including any left over high extraction flour. Let that rest in a warm spot overnight.

Dough making day:

  1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of AP flour and let rise 5-6 hours in a warm spot. 
  2. Place the rolled oats in a bowl and pour the boiling water over the oats. Cover and let cool. 
  3. Two hours before the levain is ready, mix the 540 g of water with the oat soaker on the lowest speed in the bowl of a stand mixer until the mass has been loosened up. Add the flour and mix on speed 2 until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes just a minute or two. Autolyse for a couple of hours.
  4. Once the levain is ready (mine was starting to recede), add the salt, the yogurt and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 5 minutes. Add the last 50 g of water gradually. A minute or so before the end of the 5 minutes, add the apricots and the pecans.
  5. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes. 
  6. Do 4 sets of folds at 30 minute intervals, then do another 2 sets an hour apart. Let rise an additional hour if the dough seems to be developing slowly like mine was. I placed the dough in a warm spot for the last 3 hours as it didn’t seem to be getting puffy and aerated. Place the dough in a cold fridge for 3 hours. The dough rose about 25%. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~835 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  9. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for at least an hour on the counter. I let mine go for an hour and 45 minutes or so. This dough is very firm due to the amount of add-ins so it needs a head start on proofing before refrigerating overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. I felt the loaves needed more proofing so I placed them in the counter while the oven was heating. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 17 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

Well, I sure hope they taste good to make up for the lack of oven rise! Not terribly impressed at all! They look better in photos than in real life. 🙄 Note to self: Give up on apricots and bread. 

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Danni3ll3

I considered joining in on the community bake but looking through past ideas, I came across a bake that I had adapted from Mutant Space’s recipe. At the time, one of my friends said was one of the best breads she had ever tasted. 

 

 

It has a lot of similarities to the community bake loaf as it also uses an oat porridge. The notes in that thread were very helpful. I was very careful to cook the oats on low to retain the creaminess. However, this recipe also has honey, butter, flax, sesame and sunflower seeds. I also used  Einkorn as part of the flour as I have quite a bit of it and I haven’t used it much at all. 

 

Hopefully it turns out as well as the first time I made it. 

 

Recipe 

 

Makes 3 loaves of ~975 g

 

740 oat porridge 

 

Porridge

225 g rolled oats

360 g water

90 g honey

75 g butter

 

Add-ins

75 g raw Sesame seeds

75 g raw Sunflower seeds

 

Dough

650 g unbleached flour

200 g high extraction Red Fife flour (250 g Red Fife berries)

210 g high extraction Einkorn flour (250 g Einkorn berries)

75 g flax, freshly ground

550 g water

25 g salt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

75 g extra water

 

 

The afternoon before:

  1. Mill the Red Fife and  Einkorn berries and sift to obtain the needed amount of high extraction flours. Place the required amounts in a tub. Save the bran for feeding the Levain and for another use such as bran muffins. Reserve any leftover high extraction flour for feeding the Levain in the evening and the next day. 
  2. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. 
  3. Grind the flax seeds in a bullet and add to the tub. Cover and set aside.
  4. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g bran. Let rise in a warm place. 

The night before:

  1. Add the water to the rolled oats and cook on low for about 16 minutes. When the porridge is creamy, add the butter and the honey. Stir well and put into the fridge for the night. This can be done in the morning if you wish.
  2. Toast the sesame and sunflower seeds in a dry frying pan or in the oven at 350 F. They are done when lightly golden and fragrant. Reserve.
  3. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g high extraction flour. Let that rest in a warm spot overnight.

Dough Making day:

  1. Early in the morning, feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of high extraction flour/AP flour and let rise 4-5 hours in a warm spot. 
  2. Two hours or so before the levain is ready, put 550 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub as well as the porridge.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Autolyse for at least a couple of hours at room temperature. 
  3. Once the levain is ready, add the salt and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 5 minutes. If the dough is too stiff, add the additional water while mixer is running. I definitely needed the extra water. At the end of the 5 minutes, add the toasted sesame seeds and sunflower seeds and mix til incorporated.
  4. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes at room temperature (73F). 
  5. Do 4 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals, then let the dough rise for an hour. I normally do another 2sets of folds but life interfered and the dough went into the fridge early. When I got home about 90 minutes later, I gave it another fold and a bit more counter time until I had to go out again, and it went back into the fridge. By the time I got home, the dough was really cold, stiff and had risen about 30%. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~975 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and I let it rest almost a couple of hours on the counter letting it warm up. It still felt pretty stiff when I did the final shaping. Hopefully I will be making bread and not bricks in the morning. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  8. Sprinkle half rice/half AP flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl cover or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 8-9 hours. I debated letting it proof at room temperature but by this time, it was 2:30 am so in the fridge it went. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Then take the loaves out of the fridge. The loaves didn’t look quite proofed so I let the first batch warm up on the counter for 45 minutes first. At the same time, I took out the second batch out of the fridge to finish proofing so they spent about an hour an a half on the counter. 
  2. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  3. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 17 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

Well I was right, these first loaves were definitely underproofed. The first batch ended up with craters and canyons on the surface from the explosive oven spring. 

 

I should have also read up about Einkorn first. It would have prepared me for a few of its quirks! 🙄

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Danni3ll3

This is basically a Pain de Campagne but with a bit more whole grain. I figured that a fairly plain loaf, meaning no add-ins aside from the flax, would go well with an Easter Dinner meal. 

 

Recipe:

 Makes 3 loaves

 

150 g high extraction spelt flour (200 g Spelt berries)

150 g high extraction rye flour  (200 g rye berries)

150 g high extraction Kamut flour (200 g Kamut berries)

820 g unbleached flour

50 g freshly ground flax (50 g flax seeds)

950 g filtered water

24 g Himalayan pink salt

30 g local yogurt

250 g 100% hydration levain (procedure for this is in recipe)

 

 The afternoon before:

  1. Mill the Spelt , Rye and  Kamut berries and sift to obtain the needed amount of high extraction flours. Place the required amounts in a tub. Save the bran for feeding the Levain and for another use such as bran muffins. Reserve any leftover high extraction flour for feeding the Levain in the evening and the next day. 
  2. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. 
  3. Ground the flax seeds in a bullet and add to the tub. Cover and set aside.
  4. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g bran. Let rise in a warm place. 

The night before:

  1. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g high extraction flour. Let that rest in a warm spot overnight.

Dough making day:

  1. Early in the morning, feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of high extraction flour/AP flour and let rise 4-5 hours in a warm spot. 
  2. Two hours or so before the levain is ready, put 950 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Autolyse for at least a couple of hours at room temperature. 
  3. Once the levain is ready, add the salt, the yogurt and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 5 minutes. 
  4. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes at room temperature (73F). 
  5. Do 4 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals, then do two more sets on hourly intervals. Immediately after the last fold, place the dough in the fridge for 4 hours. The dough almost doubled. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~860 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 60 minutes on the counter. 
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  8. Sprinkle half rice/half AP flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl cover or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 9-10 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Then take the loaves out of the fridge. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 17 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

Oops! They hit the lid so the tops are flat. That will probably affect the crumb. 😳I need to remember to use less flour next time! 

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Danni3ll3

Ken Forkish has a Pain au Bacon that I used to make a few years ago. My daughter mentioned that I hadn’t made any in quite a while so it was time to revisit adding bacon to bread and adding caramelized onions for good measure. 

 

 

The bacon was baked in the oven to make it easier since I was cooking 3 lbs of it! (4 batches of this recipe). 😳 

 

As to the caramelized onions, I make a huge quantity in a crockpot and freeze them in ice cube trays. This comes in super handy since caramelizing onions is normally such a long process. 

 

 Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Add-ins

120 g crumbed bacon (~350 g raw)

85 g caramelized onions (or the equivalent of one large onion)

 

Dough

750 g strong bakers unbleached flour

200 g high extraction Red Fife flour (~250 g Red Fife berries)

100 g high extraction durum flour (~150 g durum berries)

50 g buckwheat flour (50 g buckwheat groats)

825 g filtered water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g plain yogurt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Extra bran and AP flour to feed the Levain. 

 

 

Early afternoon the day before:

  1. Cook the bacon until fairly crisp and crumble it. I cooked mine in the oven to make the process a bit easier. Crumble, cover and reserve.
  2. Thaw the caramelized onions if you have some frozen in advance. (Otherwise, slice one large onion and caramelize slowly on the stove with 1 tbsp of olive oil and a bit of butter as well as a pinch of salt.) Cover and reserve.
  3. Mill the buckwheat groats for the main dough and place in a tub.
  4. Mill the Red Fife and durum berries and sift to obtain the needed amount of high extraction flours. Place the required amounts in the tub with the buckwheat flour. Save the bran for feeding the levain. Reserve the leftover high extraction flour for feeding the Levain in the evening and the next day. 
  5. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. Cover and set aside.
  6. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g bran. Let rise in a warm place. 

The night before:

  1. Before going to bed, feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g high extraction flour. Let that rest in a warm spot overnight.

Dough making day:

  1. Early in the morning, feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of durum/AP flour and let rise 4-5 hours in a warm spot. 
  2. Two hours or so before the levain is ready, put 825 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Autolyse for a couple of hours at room temperature. 
  3. Remove the caramelized onions and bacon from the fridge and leave on the counter to come to room temperature.
  4. Once the levain is ready, add the salt, the yogurt and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 5 minutes. 
  5. About half way through the final five minutes, add the caramelized onions and the crumbled bacon.
  6. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes at room temperature (73F). 
  7. Do 4 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals, then do two more sets on hourly intervals. Immediately after the last fold, place the dough in the fridge for 4-5 hours. I was gone for 5 hours. The dough rose ~75%.
  8. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~810 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 60 minutes on the counter. 
  9. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. The dough was very poofy! Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  10. Sprinkle half rice/half AP flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl cover or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 8-9 hours. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Then take the loaves out of the fridge. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 17 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

I just had an idea for when I do this again. Perogy Sourdough! I just need to add some mashed potato and some old cheddar cheese, and there you go! Hum... This might happen sooner than later!

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