The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Danni3ll3

This is an adapted recipe from The Perfect Loaf where I put in  my usual amount of 250 g of levain rather than the 180 g that the recipe scales up to when I increase everything to make 3 loaves. I did this to speed up fermentation since this was a very sluggish dough based on the last time I made this. Adding the extra levain cut the bulk by an hour (total bulk was 4 hours and 15 minutes rather than 5 and a quarter hours). 

 

 

I also reduced the hydration a bit and soaked the raisins in Bourbon. 

 

This is the link to Maurizio’s original recipe: https://www.theperfectloaf.com/cinnamon-raisin-sourdough/

 

Recipe 

 

Makes 3 small loaves 

 

Add-ins

220 g sultana raisins

22 g Bourbon

12 g cinnamon

 

Dough:

740 g strong bakers unbleached flour

300 g freshly milled red fife flour

755 g filtered water (divided into 730 g and 25 g)

22 g salt

250 g levain (done over 3 builds)

 

The day before:

Raisins

1. Soak the raisins in the bourbon and cover. Let sit overnight.

2. Be sure that your starter has been refreshed/built up a couple of times already, and give it one more feeding to equal 250 g. I used wholegrain flour for tbe first two feeds and about 1/3 wholegrain and 2/3 unbleached flour for the last feed.  Once it has doubled, refrigerate until the next day. 

3. Mill the required amounts of Red Fife berries on the finest setting possible. Add the unbleached flour to it and cover. 

Dough making day:

1. Mix the dough flours and 730 g of the water together in a stand mixer on the lowest speed for a minute or two, and then let autolyse for a couple of hours. 

2. After the autolyse, add the salt and the levain and mix for a minute on the lowest speed. Then mix on the next speed for 9 minutes. 

3. Add the remaining water, soaked raisins, and the cinnamon. Mix until the raisins are fairly well distributed. Cover the dough and let rise in a warm place.

4. After 45 minutes, give it a set of coil folds. Then, 2 more sets 45 minutes apart. 

5. Let rise until the volume has expanded by 50%. So the total bulk was 4 hours and 15 minutes. It was ine hour shorter than last time. 

6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~775 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest covered with a tea towel for an hour on the counter. This is a heavy dough so I tried to give it as much fermenting time as I could. 

7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.

8. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons. Cover, let rest 30-45 minutes, then refrigerate overnight.

Baking Day:

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Watch that they don’t burn. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

When I took the lids off, I felt like the first batch was underproofed somewhat due to the explosive oven spring so I took the second batch to warm up while the first was finishing up in the oven. I’ll post what they look like once they are done baking. 

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Danni3ll3

 

 

This is Cedar Mountain’s Grass bread with a few minor tweaks. The last time I made this, my notes has several comments about how wet this dough was so I cut the water back by 25 g and the yogurt by 10. Initially the dough seemed pretty stiff but it loosened up when I added the add-ins and as it fermented. I was also careful to cook the porridge until it was very thick. This time I ended up with a beautiful elastic dough. It resulted in nice well sprung loaves. 

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves. 

 

Add-ins

25 g hulless oats

40 g wild rice

boiling water

25 g barley flakes 

50 g large flake oats

175 g water

 

Dough

75 g rye berries

75 g spelt berries

75 g kamut berries

75 g Red Fife berries

750 g unbleached all purpose flour

700 g filtered water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g local yogurt

250 g 3 stage 100 hydration levain (procedure in recipe)

All purpose flour and a mixture of wholegrain flour for feeding the levain

Add-ins

25 g hulless oats

40 g wild rice

boiling water

25 g barley flakes 

50 g large flake oats

175 g water

 

Dough

75 g rye berries

75 g spelt berries

75 g kamut berries

75 g Red Fife berries

750 g unbleached all purpose flour

700 g filtered water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g local yogurt

250 g 3 stage 100 hydration levain (procedure in recipe)

All purpose flour and a mixture of wholegrain flour for feeding the levain

before:

1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of all purpose flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

2. Place the hulless oats and the wild rice in a heatproof bowl and add boiling water to cover by a couple of inches. Cover and let soak overnight. 

 

 

The morning before:

1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of whole grain flour (a mix of rye, spelt, kamut and red fife). Let rise until doubled (about 5 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

3. Drain the wild rice and hulless oats. Add fresh water to cover by an inch and cook gently until the wild rice has bloomed and both grains are tender. Drain well. Cover and set aside to cool. Then refrigerate. 

 

The night before:

1. Mill all the berries for the dough on the finest setting of your flour mill and place in a tub with the unbleached flour.

 

Dough making day:

1. Take the levain out of the fridge and place in a warm spot.

2. Mix the water with the flour on the lowest speed in the bowl of a stand mixer until all the flour has been hydrated. Autolyse for at least a couple of hours.

3. Take the wild rice oat mixture out of the fridge to bring to room temperature. 

4. Cook the barley flakes and the rolled oats in the 175 g of water until the water has been well absorbed and the porridge is very thick. Add to the hulless oats and wild rice.

5. After the autolyse, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 7 minutes. 

6. Add the add-ins to the bowl and continue mixing another 2 minutes or longer until well distributed.

7. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub in a warm spot (oven with light on). Let rest 30 minutes. 

8. Do 2 sets of coil folds at 30 minute intervals, then switch to hourly folds for another 2 sets.

9. Let the dough rise about 50%. The dough was there by the fourth coil fold so I just gave it another half hour after that.

10. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~825 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 

11. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can considering how wet this dough is.

12. Sprinkle barley and oats flakes in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons and cover. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge until the next morning. 

Baking Day

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

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Danni3ll3

 

 

This is one of my very favourite breads. It is so creamy and delicious.

 

This recipe is very close to my take-2 on it. This time, I didn’t have to add extra water to the dough and I decided to do all coil folds instead of half regular folds and half coil folds. I’m curious to see how that will affect the crumb.

 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Porridges: 

50 g large flake oats plus 100 g water

50 g coarse ground Khorasan  

Dough: 

300 g fresh milled Khorasan (Kamut) flour (300 g Kamut berries)

700 g strong bakers unbleached flour

700 g water 

23 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g yogurt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Whole grain and AP flour to feed levain 

Flaked khorasan and oats for topping

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of any kind of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 50 g of whole grain flour and 50 g of unbleached flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 or 7 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill the Khorasan berries and place the required amount in a tub. 
  2. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. Cover and reserve. 
  3. Mill the khorasan berries for the porridge and set aside for the morning. 

 

Dough Making day:

  1. In the morning, put 700 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Cover and autolyse for 3 hours at room temperature (73F).
  2. Add the water to the rolled oats and cook on low, uncovered, until very thick and creamy. All the water should have been absorbed. Set aside to cool. 
  3. Do the same with the coarse ground Khorasan and the water. This took about 45 minutes. Add to the oat porridge and let cool. 
  4. After the autolyse, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the dough. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 9 minutes. Add both porridges and mix for another 2 and a half minutes until well distributed.
  5. Remove dough from bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest in a warm spot to begin bulk fermentation. My warm spot is the oven with the door cracked open and the lights on. I get an ambient temperature of around 82F. 
  6. Do 1 set of coil folds after 30 minutes and then 3 sets of coils folds at 45 minute intervals. Then let the dough rise by 30%. Total bulk was about 4  hours. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~770 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let it rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  9. Sprinkle some large flake oats in the bannetons. If your bannetons are not well seasoned, sprinkle rice flour first, then the bran and the oats. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl covers or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight.

 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for an hour.
  2. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  3. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

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Danni3ll3

 

 I’m revisiting a lot of my recipes so it was time to remake this one and tweak the method as well. I did not sift out the bran and I used mostly unbleached flour in the levain. To be honest, I was being lazy since I had very little wholegrain flour handy, I just used unbleached flour. I also decided not to add the usual yogurt since the dough seemed quite hydrated and there would be plenty of fat to tenderize the crust from the onions and the bacon.

 

To make things easier, the bacon is done in the oven and the caramelized onions are done in the crockpot a few days prior. It needs a bit of planning but it sure helps having all that prepared ahead on dough making day.  

 

 Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Add-ins

120 g crumbed bacon (~350 g raw)

100 g caramelized onions 

 

Dough

750 g strong bakers unbleached flour

200 g freshly milled Red Fife flour 

100 g freshly milled durum flour

50 g freshly milled buckwheat flour 

825 g filtered water

20 g pink Himalayan salt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Extra AP flour to feed the Levain. 

 

 A few days before:

  1. Make the caramelized onions and save in the fridge. Recipe for doing these in the crockpot is below.

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of unbleached flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of unbleached flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 
  2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 
  3. Cook the bacon until fairly crisp and crumble it. I cooked mine in the oven to make the process a bit easier. Crumble, cover and refrigerate.
  4. Mill the buckwheat groats for the main dough and place in a tub.
  5. Mill the Red Fife and durum berries. Place the required amounts in the tub with the buckwheat flour. 
  6. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. Cover and set aside.

 

Dough making day:

 

  1. In the morning, put 825 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Autolyse for a couple of hours at room temperature. 
  2. Take the levain out of the fridge and place in a warm place to warm up. I use my oven with the light on.
  3. Remove the caramelized onions and bacon from the fridge and leave on the counter to come to room temperature.
  4. After 2 hours, add the salt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 9 minutes. 
  5. At the end of the 9 minutes, add the caramelized onions and the crumbled bacon. Mix until well combined.
  6. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot. 
  7. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 50%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. (Well we almost got there. Hubby decided he needed the kitchen to make dinner so my dough took a side trip to the fridge for an hour. When I took the dough out, it had risen 75% and was full of bubbles. I popped the larger ones during preshape and shaping.)
  8. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~800 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 15-30 minutes on the counter. 
  9. Do a final shape by flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and cross over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.
  10. Sprinkle a  mix of rice flour and all purpose flour in the bannetons.  Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, about 11 hours later, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Yum!

 

 

 

Caramelized Onions in the Crockpot

 

3 to 5 pounds yellow onions (4 to 5 large onions. I used Vidalia onions.)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil or melted butter (I do a bit of both)

Pinch of salt

 

  1. Cut onions in half, peel and thinly slice. Put into slow cooker. 
  2. Toss onions with the olive oil and add a few chunks of butter.
  3. Cook for 10 hours on low. Give them a stir occasionally. 
  4. Cook an additional 3 to 5 hours with the lid ajar until most of the liquid is gone.
  5. Refrigerate or freeze the onions. Onions will keep in the refrigerator for one week or in the freezer for at least 3 months.

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Danni3ll3

I liked everything about these boules the last time except for their size. They were on the small side so I increased the dough by 10% this time and it did seem a bit better. I think I would go another 10% next time. 

By the way, Selkirk wheat is an old wheat from the 50s. I get it at Daybreak Mills. It’s their hard spring wheat.

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

Ingredients 

350 g of freshly milled Selkirk Wheat flour

725 g strong bakers unbleached flour

725 g filtered water

30 g yogurt

23 g pink Himalayan salt

265 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Procedure 

Two mornings begore: 

1. Feed 2 g of starter, 4 g water and 8 g Selkirk wheat flour. 

 

Two nights before:

1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of Selkirk wheat flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night.

 

The morning before:

 

1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of Selkirk wheat flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 hours).

 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning.

 

The night before:

 

1. Place the required amount of each freshly milled flour in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it.

 

2. Cover and set aside.

 

Dough making day:

 

1. When ready to make the dough, take the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.

 

2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flour, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours.

 

3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes.

 

4. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on).

 

5. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals, and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals. Then let the dough rise to about 50%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and bubbles on top as well.

 

6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~710 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter.

 

7. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.

 

8. Sprinkle a mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight.

 

Baking Day

 

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside.

 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

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Danni3ll3

 

 

I am finally getting back to baking sourdough. I went into turtle mode and it’s time to crawl out of my shell. Maybe that should hermit crab mode since turtles can’t crawl out of their shells. 😂

Anyhow, I decided a nice fairly simple porridge bread would be a nice thing to make. And it was! 

 

Recipe 

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Porridge 

100 g large rolled oats

200 g water

45 g honey

40 g butter

 

Dough

700 g unbleached flour

200 g freshly milled wholegrain Selkirk flour 

100 g freshly milled wholegrain Spelt flour 

50 g freshly milled wholegrain rye flour

700 g water

23 g salt

30 g yogurt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Extra wholegrain flour of your choice for feeding the levain

 

Two mornings before:

1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 75 g of wholegrain flour as well as 25 g of strong baker’s flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

1. Mill the grains. Place the required amounts in a tub. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. Cover and set aside.

 

Dough Making day:

1. Early in the morning, take out the levain to warm up. I usually give it a good stir at this time.

2. Put 700 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Autolyse for at least a couple of hours at room temperature. 

3. Make the porridge: Add the water to the rolled oats and cook on low until water is absorbed and porridge is creamy. Add the butter and the honey. Stir until well distributed. 

4. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 9 minutes. At the end of the 9 minutes, add the porridge and mix until incorporated.

5. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 

6. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 50%. This took about another hour. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 

7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~810 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 45 minutes on the counter. 

8. Do a final shape by flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and cross over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.

9. Sprinkle a  mix of rice flour and all purpose flour in the bannetons. I had planned to sprinkle some rolled oats as well but I forgot. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

1. The next morning, about 11 hours later, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Yum!

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Danni3ll3

I took my Take 2 of Cedar Mountain’s Khorasan Oat Sourdough and subbed out the khorasan for Spelt. 

Here is the recipe I followed with these exceptions:

1. Used Spelt instead of Khorasan. 

2. Did not use the additional water in the dough as the Spelt flour didn’t seem to absorb as much water. 
3. Inversely, the Spelt porridge needed much more water to cook and soften. I didn’t measure how much more water I added as I just splashed more in as the porridge ran dry, but still wasn’t done. Both the oat and spelt porridge’s were quite stiff when I used them. 
4. The Spelt proofed quite quickly in the fridge and I ended up baking at 3 am. So the loaves were cold proofed for only 8 hours. 
5. And last but not least, I only made one batch of dough since I was baking just for us. It felt very odd to make just 3 loaves. 

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Danni3ll3

I needed to try something different and an old cheddar/jalapeno combo appealed to me. I took my Pain de Campagne recipe and added the cheddar, jalapeños and some chives. Hopefully, it turns out yummy.

 

 

Note: Don’t skip the parchment paper lining on this one. You’ll never get the loaves out if you do. 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Add-Ins

100 g sliced pickled jalapeños 

250 g old cheddar cheese, cut into 1/4 inch cubes

24 g minced chives

 

Main Dough

100 g freshly milled spelt flour (125 g Spelt berries)

100 g freshly milled rye flour  (125 g rye berries)

100 g freshly milled Kamut flour (125 g Kamut berries)

775 g unbleached strong bakers flour

800 g filtered water

20 g Himalayan pink salt

30 g local yogurt

250 g 100% hydration levain (procedure for this is in recipe)

Extra whole grain and unbleached flour to feed the levain 

 

Two mornings before:

1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 50 g of wholegrain flour as well as 50g of strong baker’s flour. Let rise until doubled (about 8 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

1. Mill the grain on the finest setting of your mill or measure out commercial whole grain flour of the various grains if you don’t mill your own.

2. Place the required amount of each freshly milled flour in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. Cover and set aside. 

  1. Cube the cheddar, add a tablespoon of flour and toss with your fingers to separate the chunks. Place in the fridge overnight. 
  2. Drain the jalapeños and chop them into smaller pieces. Mince the chives, put with the jalapeños in a bowl, and refrigerate overnight.

 

Dough making day:

1. When ready to make the dough, take the levain, the cheese and the chives/jalapeños out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough. I usually give the levain a good stir to redistribute the food for the yeast and bacteria. This seems to give it a head-start. 

2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flours, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 

3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes. Put in the add-ins and mix until well integrated. This takes a good couple of minutes. 

4. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 

5. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 50%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. This took another hour and a half after the last coil fold. 

6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~850 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 

7. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule. Note that the cheese cubes like to pop out so I pulled them off the outside as much as possible and tucked them under the dough. In retrospect, that was a really good idea since it helped to minimize the sticking of the loaves to the sides of the pots. 

8. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Be aware that the loaves might stick to the sides of your pots due to the cheese. I ran a thin knife down the sides to break the stuck spots and with the parchment paper on the bottom, the loaves popped right out. 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Time to revisit this one too!

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

 

Porridges: 

50 g large flake oats plus 100 g water (I got 145 g of porridge)

50 g coarse ground Khorasan (I put the dot of my Komo mill 180 degrees counter clockwise from the finest setting) plus 125 g water (I got 140 g of porridge)

 

Dough: 

300 g fresh milled Khorasan (Kamut) flour (300 g Kamut berries)

700 g strong bakers unbleached flour

700 g water + 25 g + 25 g

23 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g yogurt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

Whole grain and AP flour to feed levain 

Flaked khorasan and oats for topping

 

Two mornings before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of any kind of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

  1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 50 g of whole grain flour and 50 g of unbleached flour. Let rise until doubled (about 6 or 7 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill the Khorasan berries and place the required amount in a tub. 
  2. Add the unbleached flour to the tub. Cover and reserve. 
  3. Mill the khorasan berries for the porridge and set aside for the morning. 

 

Dough Making day:

  1. In the morning, put 700 g filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the flours from the tub.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated. This takes a couple of minutes. Cover and autolyse for 2.5-3 hours at room temperature (73F).
  2. Add the water to the rolled oats and cook on low, uncovered, until very thick and creamy. All the water should have been absorbed. Set aside to cool. 
  3. Do the same with the coarse ground Khorasan and the water. This took a lot longer than the oats before all the grains were tender. At about 45 minutes, I was happy that everything was tender. Add to the oat porridge and let cool. 
  4. After the autolyse, add the salt, the yogurt, the first 25 g of water and the levain to the dough. Mix on the lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on the next speed for 9 minutes. Add both porridges as well as the last 25 g of water, and mix for another 2 and a half minutes until well distributed.
  5. Remove dough from bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest in a warm spot to begin bulk fermentation. My warm spot is the oven with the door cracked open and the lights on. I get an ambient temperature of around 82F. 
  6. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals and then 3 sets of sleepy ferret (coil) folds at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise until risen by 30%.  I usually do only 2 sleepy ferret folds but the dough felt like it could do with an extra set. Total bulk was about 5.25 hours. 
  7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~780 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let it rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  8. Do a final shape by flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  9. Sprinkle some Khorasan flakes and large flake oats in the bannetons. If your bannetons are not well seasoned, sprinkle rice flour first, then the bran and the oats. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl covers or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. Try to let proof for no longer than 12 hours. Unfortunately, life got in the way and these were baked at 13 and 15 hours. The second batch was really soft and definitely felt overproofed. 

 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for an hour.
  2. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  3. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 

 

Making this by request. Bulk method changed to my usual just to see how that affects the crumb. Original called for two sets of folds at 50 and 100 minutes with a 4 hour bulk in total. I also cut back the original hydration by 50 grams as I felt the dough didn’t need it. 

 

Levain:

63 g starter 

63 g water 

110 g unbleached flour 

15 g freshly milled Rye flour 

 

Dough:

750 g strong bakers unbleached flour

100 g freshly milled Kamut flour

100 g freshly milled Spelt flour

50 g freshly milled Rye flour

750 g filtered water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g Slate River Dairy yogurt

250 g levain from above

 

Add-ins:

90 g Roasted Garlic 

85 g Sun dried tomatoes 

90 g Slate River Herb Cheese

  

Three nights before:

  1. Get your starter up to speed by feeding it two times. Once that night and once the next morning. Let rise at room temperature (70-73 F ) for 12 hours each.

 

Two nights before:

  1. Mix the starter with the water and then add the flours. Let ferment at room temperature for 12 hours. Refrigerate until the morning of making the dough. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill and measure out your flours and set aside covered.
  2. Roast the garlic and mash. 
  3. Chop sun-dried tomatoes if needed. I got julienned so no need to chop. Set aside. 
  4. Grate Herb Cheese. 
  5. Refrigerate garlic and cheese. 

 

Dough making day:

  1. Remove the levain from the fridge to warm up to room temperature.
  2. Mix the flours and the water in a stand mixer and mix on low for one or two minutes until you have a shaggy dough and no dry flour. Let autolyse for a couple of hours.
  3. Remove add-ins from fridge to bring to room temperature. 
  4. Add the salt, the yogurt and the starter in chunks. Mix on low for 1 minute to mix the ingredients and then mix on the next speed up for 9 minutes to develop the gluten.
  5. Add the add-ins gradually and mix for a minute or two to distribute them throughout the dough.
  6. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 
  7. Do 2 sets of stretches and folds at 30 minute intervals, and then 2 sets of sleepy ferret folds (coil folds) at 45 minute intervals. Then let the dough rise to about 40%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and bubbles on top as well. 
  8. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~780g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 
  9. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  10. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons. Cover and let sit for 15 minutes, then refrigerate overnight. 

 

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough, seam side up, inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 

I need to go back to baking after 10-12 hours of refrigeration. I’ve been lazy lately and ignoring the amount of time spent in the fridge for proofing but these turned out really nice! 


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