The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100 % Whole Grain Kamut With 14 % Sprouted

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

100 % Whole Grain Kamut With 14 % Sprouted

More than 2 years ago Lucy and I baked out first 100% Kamut Bread that was at 102% hydration.  Back then we weren't using straight rice flour in out baskets and the dough stuck causing a nasty disfigurement here:

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/30081/100-hydration-100-whole-grain-kamut-flat-boule-yw-and-sd-combo-starter

 The bread tasted fine and the crumb was fairly open due to the YW and SD combo levain we used.  We also ground the whole berries in a Krup’s coffee grinder since we didn’t have a grain mill till much later.  We thought we would give it another go to try to fix some of these earlier problems.

 

Lucy decide to add a small amount of whole grain Kamut sprouted flour to the mix this time and to only use a Kamut SD levain  leaving the YW out which I thought would be a mistake since YW really opens up the crumb of whole grain breads so well.   She didn’t want the YW to cancel at the sour as it does when mixed in the SD levain.

 

The sprouted Kamut was soaked  for 4 hours then drained and sprouted for 24 hours in a sprouter before being paper towel dried and then air dried in the Arizona sun over 4 hours to make sure the enzymes we released were not harmed by high heat.

 

We did our usual 3 stage levain build where we used the 15% extracted hard bits of the milled Kamut to get the levain up to speed.  We did not use any sprouted flour hard bits for the levain but we did put the sprouted flour into the autolyse with the 85% extraction of the non sprouted Kamut.

 

Since the sprouted grain went into the autolyse we limited it to 1/2 hour so it wouldn’t spike the autolyse into enzymatic overload.   Then the levain and the salt were added before a short mix with a spoon and 8 minutes of slap and folds.  During the slap and folds we adjusted the final dough water with small additions to fit the final mix feel as it was slapped around without learning a lesson.

 

We ended up at around 90% hydration which was 12% lower than the bake 2 years ago.  We think the sprouted flour was the difference plus we wanted a less wet mix since we planned on an 18 hour retard instead of 12 hours. After a 30 minute rest we did 3 sets of stretch and folds from the compass points on 30 minute intervals to finish off the gluten development.  

 

This got us to the 2 hour mark since mixing and we let the dough rest for 10 minutes before shaping into a squat oval, putting it a basket, bagging it and putting it in the fridge for long cold retard.

 

18 hours later it had proof sufficiently to warm up on the counter as Big Old Betsy was heated to ramming speed of 550 F when the Mega Steam went in for 15 minutes before the dough was un-molded onto parchment on a peel, slashed and slid onto the bottom stone for 15 minutes of steam.  Once the steam came out the oven was turned down to 425 F or another 10 minutes of baking until the inside hit 210 F – our new standard temperature for sprouted flour bread.

 

The thing to remember about Kamut is that it has a pretty good protein percent but it is very extensible and not very elastic.  The protein gluten isn’t the kind one would normally pick for bread that wasn’t going to be panned up when over 80% hydration like this one at 87.5%.   This dough was slack but it didn’t stick to the basket this time.

 We expected it to spread after it was un-molded due to the grain used and the sprouts too.  but it did try to puff itself up some in the heat of the oven and did bloom a bit.  The crust came out that beautiful orange tinged color that a durum derivative grain is so famous for.  It came out of the oven crispy but it went soft as it cooled.

 The yellow crumb also associated with durum was the other striking feature.  The crumb was open for 100% whole grain bread. It was soft and very moist due to the sprouts.  The best part was the taste though.  Nothing tastes as sweet as Kamut and the sprouts made is taste like it has a bit of sweet cornbread in it – maybe that was the color affecting my tongueJ

 This is one fine bread and if you want it to look like a majestic tall loaf, just pan it up instead but….you will miss the higher percent of tasty crust with a boule.

 

Whole KamutSD Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

9 Week Retarded Rye Starter

6

0

0

6

1.39%

85% Extraction Kamut

0

0

24

24

5.57%

15% Extraction Kamut

6

12

0

18

4.18%

Water

6

12

0

18

4.18%

Total

18

24

24

66

15.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

45

10.44%

 

 

 

Water

21

4.87%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

46.67%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

10.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extraction Kamut

326

75.64%

 

 

 

100% Whole Sprouted Kamut

60

13.92%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

386

89.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.86%

 

 

 

Water

332

77.03%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

86.01%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

431

 

 

 

 

Liquid w/ Starter

353

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

87.47%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

816

 

 

 

 

% Whole Kamut

100.00%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Sprouted Kamut

13.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11 (not verified)

How in the Dickens did you get that crumb? WOW!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

it is 99.2%  Whole Kamut and .8% whole rye since there is 3.6 g of rye in the 6 g of rye starter used:-)  The crumb is very similar to the 100% Kamut at 102% hydration bread from 2 years ago that stuck to the basket when un-molding but that one had YW in it.   Kamut is probably the easiest of the whole grains to get an open crumb because it does have a higher protein than just about any other grain but does tend to be less elastic and more extensible.

Normally I would do 3 sets of slap and folds and 3 sets of stretch and folds over the first 2 hours to develop the gluten but with whole grain breads I would rather do one set of slap and folds and then start in with the 3 sets of stretch and folds and just put more rest time between them to get to the hour mark - to help open the crumb.  The more you handle dough the less open the crumb will be generally speaking

This is why I prefer to do long shaped retards in the fridge rather than long bulk retards in the fridge.  Handling the dough one more time a couple pf hours before baling results in more sense crumb for me.  If I am doing a bread for sandwiches then the bulk cold retard is the way to go.

The other things that make of a more open crumb is that the hard bits of the non sprouted grain are sifted out and fed to the levaiin so that these sharp gluten cutting parts are wet for the longest time possible so they are are soft as possible before hitting the dough.  The  retard the built levain for 24-48 hours to really let them get soft.  A mire sour bread will result with this levain retard  You could also sift out the hard bits from the dried, sprouted grains and feed that to the levain too bit since this was going to be a longer 18 hour retard than the normal 12 hours, I didn't want to put the levain into enzyme over drive and risk having the dough over proof during retard.

As you can see, the dough was probably at 97% proof when it hit the oven anyway since the spring and bloom were less than average fr sure .  I like getting whole grain breads in the oven at 85% proof for spring and bloom but getting it in closer to 95% proof wand keeping it from collapsing, like this one, might produce bigger holes in the crumb while the crust looks suffer as a result.

Our general rules for an open crumb are - Less handling letting time develop more of the gluten, do a shaped long cold proof vs a long cold bulk ferment, get as much of the hard bits in the levain and retard it for 24-48 hours before using and the lastly go with a wetter dough.  Going wet will move thongs along faster .  Normally I would like this dough to be at 95-100% hydration rather than the 87.5% of this one but since the shaped retard was going to be 18 instead of 12 hours, the dough would have over proofed for sure in the fridge with a higher hydration. 

Everything needs to be kept in balance.  This balance is a real juggling act and takes some experimenting with so many variables but that is why I have a Bread Baking Apprentice 2nd Class who does all the hard wprk and comes up with the recipes:-)

Happy baking Abe

golgi70's picture
golgi70

phenomenal for 100% fresh milled Kamut.  Bravo!!! It's a tricky flour to work with but it looks like toned down hydration is very helpful.  

Cheers

josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Any more water and this would belong in a pan.  We liked the taste the best.  Glad you liked it and

Happy Baking  

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I love reading your descriptions-I learn something new every time. Beautiful loaf! Kamut is delicious and I learned early on about how extensible and how it seems to go to overproof very quickly. I was doing 100% kamut but not with any where near your talent.

 

Thank you, and Lucy, too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

except that spelt might even be faster and more sloppy at the same hydration with less protein too.  Nothing is as naturally sweet and creamy colored as Kamut,  Your praise is too kind but we like it !  Glad you liked the bread and Lucy wishes your bread baking tall the best,

Happy Baking

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

more crust.  It's beautiful!  And then toasting the crumb too!   I like Kamut more than Einkorn any day of the week.  

Today I had some rye berries in my hands that are called "edge of the woods wild rye."  A slightly smaller berry than normal rye berries.  

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

sounds like a rare find Mini!  If anyone can bring the most out of it ....It would be you!  The yellow color and extra sweetness of Kamut make it one of the best grains going - one of the best really - but it is getting more expensive at 4-5 times the cost of wheat:-)

Glad you liked the bread Mini and 

Happy baking

greenbriel's picture
greenbriel

And your next post with the additions, too. You guys are so inspiring. Once I get a few more techniques solid I'm looking forward getting more adventurous with flours/grains and add-ins.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

different loaves of bread to bake....not counting the pure unbleached white AP one with YW we just posted,  It's nice to mix them up so Lucy doesn't get so bored she wants to take over around here...... and be the master rather than the apprentice :-)

Glad you liked the post and we look forward to your next baguette attempt.

Happy baking 

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

I wish there was a like or thanks button here.

Often I don't have anything to say other that I appreciate you taking the time to take the pictures and add the notes ...I look forward to these posts ...so "Thanks" :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Not only does she come up with the bread formulas and take my abuse, she also has to do all the thinking, picture taking and typing for the blog posts.  I read her your comment and she immediately rolled over and demanded a tummy rub. 

You are too kind and we enjoy having something worthwhile to do besides gardening, cooking, cleaning, fiixing broken things  and the laundry.  Thanks right back at you - you made my day.

Happy Baking  

isand66's picture
isand66

WOW...what a fantastic loaf....that crumb is amazing for a 100% or 98% Kamut loaf, and it must taste great.

Way to go Lucy and DA!

Now on to your next post..my you've been busy.

I have to catch up as I'm 2 bakes behind.  Have to refresh the starter so I can make something this weekend and hopefully finally sprout some more grains.  I've been very busy at work so it's been tough.

Happy Baking,

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

with your love of all bread durum!  This one was fun, as all high hydration bakes are but it was nearly over proofed to the point of collapse.  Very sweet tasting bread for a whole grain loaf.  The Kamut bales were from November so Lucy is all caught up now with old bakes.

Looking forward to your old and new bakes Ian.  :Lucy says Hi to her buddies  That work thing can be a drag on baking.  Better work very hard at not working which seems more fun.  Have to finish cleaning the house today though. so the Valentine's Day guests don't think my wife and apprentice are pigs :-)

Happy Baking Ian

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

I love high extraction 100% fresh milled and it doesn't get any better than this. Reminds me of Pips/Phil's Tarlee miche, one of my all time favorite TFL posted breads.  You'be inspired me to swap out the einkorn that's been featured our most recent bakes for kamut --  neglected for too long in the cabinet. 

Great one, Chef Dab.   Compliments (rubs) to the apprentice. 

Tom

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Phil's post.  It is sad we don't see many of his posts anymore.  To be honest I'm not a big fan of einkorn and do like Kamut better, einkorn can be can be of bitter where Kamut is sweet.  Einkorn mixed with Kamut, emmer and spelt would be a fine ancient grain mix.  Sadly, all are expensive though  Glad you liked this bread  Tom.  It is a fine tasting whole grain bread,

Happy baking and Lucy sends her best too.