The Fresh Loaf

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Sprouted 4 Grain Sourdough Chacon with Whey, Walnuts and Sage

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Sprouted 4 Grain Sourdough Chacon with Whey, Walnuts and Sage

This is another take on Lucy’s recent sprouted grain experimentation.   This time she used a 4 whole grain blend of equal parts of: spelt, rye, farro and wheat for the sprouted part and the whole grain part too.  But she cut the sprouted part in half hoping to further bring this kind of bread back down to earth without it fermenting away at ramming speed and over proofing.

 

This time the levain amount was 9% of the total flour and water weight instead of 7%.  All of the hard bits sifted from the sprouted and the whole grain berries was used to feed the levain you get the hard bits as wet for as long as possible…plus the levain loves these hard bits.  In this case there, was only 14 g of hard bits at the 11.3% extraction so some of the 88.7% extraction was also used to feed the levain.

 

We sprouted on Monday for 24 hours and dried in the A sun on Tuesday.  On Wednesday we ground the sprouted and whole grains and got 10 g of rye starter from our 8 week old stash in the fridge.  We did our unusual 3 stage levain build of 2 - 4 and 4 hours where the levain was refrigerated for 24 hours 4 hours after the 3rd stage instead of our usual 1 hour following.

 


We got the levain out of the fridge on Thursday and while it was warming up we autolysed the remaining dough flour for 1 hour with a mix if yogurt whey and water with the salt sprinkled on top.  We also whizzed up 10 g of the walnuts to mix with the 10 g of walnut oil and the tablespoon of minced fresh sage to make the walnut and sage paste.  Walnuts and Sage is a specialty of Phil’s (PiPs) - Super Hero, Purple People Eater Bread found here.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27219/tartines-aromatic-semolina-bread-walnut-and-sage-wholewheat  And my take on it here.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27373/pips-walnut-and-sage-100-whole-wheat

And another walnut and sage chacon here

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29002/sd-yw-chacon-revisited-%E2%80%93-87-whole-grain-multigrain-sprouts-walnut-and-sage-paste-and-pump  We do like walnuts and sage in bread with a little whey and walnut oil paste….but it isn’t a bad thing!

 

Once all the flour, liquid and salt came together, we did 3 sets of slap and folds of 7, 1 and 1 minute on 20 minute intervals.  After 3 sets of slap and folds were done we did 3 sets of stretch and folds on 45 minute intervals incorporating the walnut oil, walnut and sage paste with the walnuts on the first set pf S& F’s.

 

After a half hour rest we pre-shaped the dough into a boule and 10 minutes later we changed our minds and made the dough into a chacon by making a knotted roll with 100g of dough for the middle of the bottom of the basket and 8 balls of 30g each surrounding it.

 

The remaining dough was shaped into a taught, squat, flattish round to cover the design in the bottom of the basket.  We let it proof for 45 minutes on the counter in a used trash can liner before retarding it for 20 hours in the fridge.

 

We haven’t baked under the bottom of a DO for some time so thought we would do so for this bake.  The dough had risen very well in the fridge but since it was a chacon and no scoring necessary, we decided to let the dough warm up on the counter for a half an hour before Big Old Betsy was heated up to 550 F which took another 45 minutes.

 

We overturned the bread onto parchment on a peel, slid the bread into the oven on the bottom stone and immediately covered it with the bottom of an aluminum DO for 20 minutes of steaming as we turned the oven down to 500 F or 2 minutes and then down to 475 F for 18 more.

 

Once the lid came off, we turned the oven down to 425 F - convection this time and continued to bake or another 10 minutes until the bread read 208 F on the inside and was removed to the cooling rack.  It sprang well, cracked where the chacon design forced it to and browned up well enough.   It came out of the oven very crispy but went softer as it cooled.

 

The crumb came out that walnut shade of purple we love so much, was fairly open with the sage smell hanging around in a subtle way.  There was a little more of an acid tang due to the yogurt whey but it didn’t detract from the fine flavor of this bread even though the sprouted flavor of the grain was less than usual..  We like this sprouted grain bread the best so far.  The taste is superb and if you haven't made a bread like this - you should  and soon - it is that good.

 

Formula

Wonder if this smoked corned beef would go well with this fine bread?  Or would it be better as hash?

 

Rye SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

8 Week Retarded 66% hydro. Rye Starter

10

0

0

10

2.58%

88.7% Whole & Sprouted 4 Grain extraction

0

1

20

21

5.43%

11.3% Whole & Sprouted 4 grain Extraction

5

9

0

14

3.62%

Water

5

10

20

35

9.04%

Total

20

20

40

80

20.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

40

10.34%

 

 

 

Water

40

10.34%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

9.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

88.7 % griain extraction

87

22.48%

 

 

 

12% Protein White Flour Mix

300

77.52%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

387

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

2.11%

 

 

 

Whey 147,water

268

69.25%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

69.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

427

 

 

 

 

Total Liquid w/ Starter

308

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walnut Oil

10

2.58%

 

 

 

Walnuts

80

20.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total. Hydration with Starter

72.13%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

834

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

32.04%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11.97% Protein flour mix is equal parts of LaFama 11.22% AP.

 

12.7% King Arthur bread flour amd 12% Winco AP flour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 T Fresh Sage

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucy says not to forget the salad to go with the sunset and.....have a great weekend.

Comments

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

I love the shaping of your loaf, and no doubt, the nuts and sage made for an aromatic kitchen. I admire you and Lucy, always thinking, always innovative, what a team!

I have a couple of questions, please, the grains were sprouted for just 24 hours? Other than hydrating and beginning to activate some enzymes, how much progress can they make toward germination in that time? Perhaps that is not the goal... I have no means to mill (yet), so have not looked into trying to sprout.

...and a "used" trash can liner? lol

Cathy

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to get the pictures up.  TFL site wasn't being cooperative  or some reason with many fits and and starts.  it is all up now though.  Sprouting grain isn't  like alfalfa sprouts or bean sprouts.  You soak the grains for 4 hours covered in water and then sprout them or about 24 hours in the simmer and 36 in the winter.  All you want is the grain to crack open at one end and show the first signs of a white shoot.  This is called 'chitting'.  Then you dry them and grind them without getting the temperature over 125 F or less if you can so that the enzymes aren't killed off.  If you go farther, sprouting longer, you are mating.

If you want to make white diastatic malt you would allow them to sprout for 4 days until the thicker shoot (not the 3 roots) is the length of the seed itself and then dry and grind.  You don't want to be putting a bunch of this in your bread but using about .6 of 1%  the weight of home milled flour will malt it since it has no malt.  IF you take the temperature of the malted seeds up gradually to 325 F you will brown them, kill off the enzymes and after grinding, turn the malt red - non diastatic red malt.  This is used in bread making to flavor and color the crust and crumb.  

Here is a post on Malting Making Red Rye Malt

This chacon design did come out like a tortoise shell.  Who knew Lucy was so artsy?  We love sage and walnuts in combination and we thank PiPs f(Phil) or that.  Glad you liked the bread and

Happy baking

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

for explaining about sprouting and malts. I will be reading up on all of them. One good thing about working with natural materials - there's always more to learn. I love the purple coloration, too and wll definitely be baking with walnuts this weekend!

Cathy

emkay's picture
emkay

Lucy and I must be on the same wavelength. I am just about to post about my whole wheat walnut bread. One of these days I'll have to try adding sage. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a great combination. Loved your walnut bread.  What a nice open crumb for such a high % whole grain bread!  Another one of our favorite walnut breads in Mini Oven's 100% Whole Rye with Walnuts at 104% hydration. - A classic!

The great thing about bread is that there are so many flavoring ingredients - the list is endless - and so tasty.

Happy Baking

emkay's picture
emkay

So many recipes, so little time...

Kiseger's picture
Kiseger

Beautiful result, I love your chacon work!  And I chortled at the used trash can liner.....brilliant.  The sage must give it lovely flavour on top of the nuts.  Yummm.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

proof several other previous bakes if i got the right one out this time:-)  We love chacons.  We've used knotted rolls, braids, balls, ropes, twisted ropes and all kinds of combinations to get various designs.  It is fun to see how each one turns out!  Sage and walnuts is like sun dried tomato and rosemary - just delicious.  This one is one of our favorite breads and Lucy outdid herself this time.  Can't wait to try it toasted with cheese and little meat of some kind.

Glad you liked it.  It isn't the easiest bread with sprouted grains, walnut oil paste and the chacon decorating but when it turns out as nice as this one inside and out -  it makes it worth it.

Happy baking

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

I just love your chacons, so rustic and evocative of ancient history!  The sprouted grain must have been delicious and sweet, a nice, complex counterpoint to the sour.  And the sage and walnuts, yum.  Best of all is your colorful veggie plate :)

Thanks for the inspiration,

Julie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

old,ancient and rustic too:-)  I finally got the right amount of sprouted grains in this bread.  I was using twice as much  and the dough was struggling to make it 20 hours in the fridge without over proofing.  Third time was the charm.  We love the taste of sprouted grains.  You are so right, the taste of this bread is very complex and satisfying.  Not too sour, nutty and earthy - amazing how the sage really rounds everything out.

Glad you like the bread FlourChild and

Happy Baking

golgi70's picture
golgi70

All around crumb, crust, and the chacon design.  Love the purple streaking in the crumb.  

Enjoy

 

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This one tastes awful good too.  A bit of extra work and time but ,when you only make one loaf a week - it is worth it.  The purple streaking is beautimous! Glad you liked it

Hapyy Baking Josh 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Here is the rest of it.  This one tastes awful good too.  A bit of extra work and time but ,when you only make one loaf a week - it is worth it.  The purple streaking is beautimous! Glad you liked it

Hapyy Baking Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Here waw the rest of it Josh

This one tastes awful good too.  A bit of extra work and time but ,when you only make one loaf a week - it is worth it.  The purple streaking is beautimous! Glad you liked it

Hapyy Baking Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Love this one DA!  You and Lucy have come up with a masterpiece.  I have to try a Chacon on my next bake after my rye breads I'm baking this morning.  That corned beef looks as good as any I've ever seen.  Wish you could teleport some over to go with my rye bread :).

Question: how big was your proofing basket for this one and did your shaped dough double in size before baking?

Happy Baking and Hi from my the gang of apprentices.  Lexie just jumped up on my shoulders as I was typing this and woofed to Lucy her long distance sister :>

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Looks like you've got the runaway fermentation reigned in.  Great looking loaf, dabrownman!

Marcus

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The mills that sell sprouted flour, do they kill off the enzymes with heat before they grind?  If you put too much of the unheated kind in bread, it really takes off.  I've seen some SD recipes where all the flour was sprouted! .  In the AZ heat, the dough would turn to mush before it could ferment:-)  Nothing like a chacon to be a show stopper.  This is a very satisfying loaf inside and out and I'm glad you liked it.

Happy baking 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

I’ve wondered the same thing.  It could be just that simple, dry the grain at a high enough temp.  It needs to be dried anyway, right?  Probably easier to control the outcome in an industrial setting than at home, but still it’s something to tinker with.  My own sprouting experiments have been on hold for awhile, the general craziness of life getting in the way, but I’ll get back to it eventually.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

were made to fry grains at exactly between 105 - 115 F every day.  I finally figured out how to keep the birds from eating the grain as it dries........  This weeks bake we will increase the sprouted grain 50% to see if it runs away again.  I'm going to do some research on sprouted flour to see how it is dried.  I'm guessing you can buy it either way :-)

Thanks Marcus 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The two things to remember to get the chacon to crack properly is to not get the hydration over 72% and make sure it goes in the oven  at90% proof.  #Too much water will make everything stick together and not want to open and over proofing won't give the loaf any upward cracking spring like any other loaf.

If you look at the two photos of when the dough hit the basket and the next one further down you can see what it looked like in the basket right before it went into the oven 20 some hours later.   It looks like about 90% proof to me .  For this one, all the planets lined up and it sprang really well and cracked beautifully. 

Chacons are great for the holidays to wow family and friends or for special occasions.  This one tastes pretty good too.  When they looks and taste good you canlt go wrong.  You will ahve fun making designs for chacons.

The basket it 3" high on the outside and 7 1/4" wide on the inside.

Lucy is sending a photo to here cohorts.  Happy Chaconning Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Lexie and Max send their love :).  She is a cutie.  I've been trying to get mine from going berserk when they see someone riding a bicycle and I think I finally figured it out.  A little squirt of water from a spray bottle seems to have gotten my point across.  

My rye bread tastes good but looks like a beginner shaped it.  I really did a piss poor job of shaping and may have overproofed to boot.

Happy baking.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Jewish Deli Rye into batards for the same reason.  I get them too wet and they look weird when baked - like a scientific oddity :-)  I'll take a JDR boule with rye four on top that cracks to let you know when it is ready to bake any day.....

isand66's picture
isand66

Sounds like a plan for next time!  BTW I made some SD bagels a few days ago also.  I was pretty happy about the way they came out, but it still is missing something in the flavor dept. to match the bagel shop taste.  Not sure what's missing but I have to tinker around a bit.  At least I have a good starting point.  This was the recipe that fellow TFL member adapted from Peter Reinhart's poolish bagel recipe.

Anyway, we are off to the Potato Festival on the east end of the Island.  First time, so hopefully it will be fun and maybe inspiring.

Happy Baking.  P.S. my central air broke yesterday and today's 86 and humid...I no it's still cold compared to your scorching heat, but it's hot enough with the humidity that Max wanted to go back in the house after 5 minutes on our walk :).

Eli's picture
Eli

Excellent loaf and healthy to boot! Amazing photos too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

It is a very tasty loaf..... hearty and healthy.  These chaons are fun to make too! 

Happy Baking

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I never tried that shape - it's beautiful.

You should write a book with Lucy's elaborate formulas - amazing what creativity comes from such a small Dackeline's brain!

Happy Baking,

Karin

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Beautiful bread, DA! excellent crumb and crust.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We love making these kinds of bread.  Hearty, healthy, tasty, not bad looking  but, most of all, fun to make!

Happy Baking Khalid and continued good response to your market offerings. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that she wouldd make a weekly special bread, costing a dollar more for sure, shaped as some kind of chacon to make it special.  They are just so much fun to make and the design possibilities are endless - but not good if the dough gets too wet or over proofed - but what bread is?

I sometimes wonder how Lucy comes up with her recipes but I attribute them to popping into her tiny Dakel  Bread Pan right after she licks her own arse.  I'm pretty sure it's an old German baking myth, possibly even a real thing,  that few would know about :-)

Lucy does have her own bread book, titled ......A Dakel's Bread Pan...... with all of her bread concoctions, oddities,  write ups, fairy tales and photos in it.  It is now over several hundred formulas and counting.   Not so strangely,  it is written in Swedish. 

Glad you like the bread Karin - it tastes as good as it looks. 

Happy chacon baking  Karin

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I have had a busy time and have not been baking. This is truly an inspiring loaf though. I am going away again for the month of October to meet a sister I never knew I had after nearly 60 years on the planet. I will re-build my YW and levains on my return and give the chacon style of loaf a try. Once again nice bake and great looking food. Ski

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You will like the Chacon as much as the seam side up flower you are so good at producing in the DO.  This was a tasty loaf for sure.  It is so wonderful you get to see your long lost sister after 60 years!  So heart warming.  Lofe is full of suprises.  Lucy and I are happy for you,  Have a safe trip and enjoy your reunion!

Happy baking Ski