The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

liquid lecithin

mommoe71's picture
mommoe71

liquid lecithin

What is liquid lecithin and where do I find it?

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I Googled it and it comes up as a liquid herbal supplement which can be added to drinks, shakes, salads, etc. - or used as a nonstick coating on pots and pans.

Try Google and you'll find a number of places that sell it.

mommoe71's picture
mommoe71

I found a bread recipe with this as one of the ingredients any ideas?

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

Our local whole foods sells liquid lecithin in the supplement aisle.  It's in a rather large bottle and costs around $10.  If you google around, you will find formulas for making a non-stick coating for pans, too, so it might be worth the investment.  I've never tried it because that price is a little steep for something I'm not sure I want large quantities of. 

siuflower's picture
siuflower

I brought my lecithin  in a health food store for less than $5.

 

mredwood's picture
mredwood

Glad to hear whole foods sells liquid lecithin. Years ago I had a small bottle that sat on my counter. Every thing that went in the oven or in a frypan got a coating of it. Nothing stuck. Ever. No matter how much It burnt. Now all I can find at Bob's is the powder. Whole foods here I come.

Mariah

clazar123's picture
clazar123

It sells for about $6(US) a pint bottle here in the Midwest of USA and it is a thick,yellow,oily liquid-derived from soy, if I'm not mistaken. It is great both as a non-stick coating for any pan and as an additive to baked goods.It will turn things a golden color,though.I use it in place of some of the liquid oil, sometimes, in baked goods.

Mredwood is absolutely correct-nothing ever sticks!I have a small jar with a mix of about3-4 tablespoons vegetable oil and a few teaspoons of liquid lecithin mixed. I use a pastry brush to apply to any baking container or pan.Nothing sticks and bread/muffins/rolls pop right out-except where you didn't hit with the brush-quite amazing.

mommoe71's picture
mommoe71

GREAT INFO GUYS!!!! Sorry it took so long to get back with a reply.I will start looking right away.THANKS!

Pharmerphil's picture
Pharmerphil

confused: do I want powder or liquid, sunflower or soy for my breads

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I believe mine is liquid soy lecithin (not at same location as bottle). Any foodsafe variety will work. I never worked with the granules. I use the mix of lecithin/oil as the non-stick pan coating and just the liquid lecithin as an ingredient in bread recipes.It is a very thick, dark golden syrup that will stain clothing and even with dish detergent is stubborn to remove. I mix a little (precisely one or 2 glugs) with any vegetable oil and use a brush to apply. Even mixing with oil takes a while. It helps if both are a little warmed by placing the bottles in a bowl of warm water before pouring into the storage jar. It mixes easier.

Any baking spray with oil and lecithin will be equivalent-I just like to make my own.

Pharmerphil's picture
Pharmerphil

thanks for your reply

Hermit's picture
Hermit

Liquid lecithin is extremely viscous. It's like tree sap. I find that this makes it difficult to measure since, if you try to spoon it up, you will wait forever for it to droop off the spoon and level off. It also sticks to everything and you can't squeegee it away with a rubber spoon.

In my opinion soy lecithin granules are much easier to work with. You just dissolve them into melted oil or a fat like melted shortening or melted butter by stirring for a couple minutes. Still, that's better than waiting 10 minutes for the liquid version to roll off a spoon or the extra 1/4 cup of dishwasher soap that you need to use to get it off your utensils.

David R's picture
David R

...a mis-named product. Lecithick? 😁

Hermit's picture
Hermit

Also, a small bit goes a long way but it's the secret ingredient to making very fluffy breads without using eggs (it's vegan).