The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Experiement

  • Pin It
marieJ's picture
marieJ

Experiement

For those experienced sourdough bakers..... I've been wondering what the effect would be if I were to 'encapture' small pockets of water into the dough at the end of final kneading (or even final shaping) without kneading them to incorporate them into the dough?  The idea might be to indent the dough with finger tips and fill the small indentations with small amounts of water, then fold over, seal the dough..??...


What might the effect be in the final baked loaf?


Would the water just soak into the loaf and create chewy sections of the crumb?


Might it increase the activity of the yeast and bacteria at that specific location and create large, irregular bubbles/hole in the final baked loaf?


Curious.


Cheers!


Marie


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 And how hydrated is the dough?


Mini

marieJ's picture
marieJ

Hello Mini.


Thank you for your many valuable insights and advice. I thought I would create a doughsof varying hydration levels and test the results.


I had assumed that a dough of low hydration would create a counter effect of drawing any captured water in to the general body of dough.  Therefore, I'd reasoned that a wet dough would be the more likely vehicle to create an intended outcome of capturing water into the prepared dough.


Any thoughts?


cheers


Marie

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

I tried this about 5 months ago - tried to make a ciabatta style dough but rather than incorporate the last 5% water into the mixed dough, I tried to 'fold it in' by dimpling the dough, sprinkling water and folding over to seal, during the 'stretch-and-fold'


Sad to say it completely failed (as a ciabatta) - you may have better luck with a stiffer dough, but as I recall the result was big areas of very dense dough . No real holes to speak of.


Sorry I can't be more encouraging.


FP


 

marieJ's picture
marieJ

Thanks FP


This is the result I would have expected too. Its always rewarding to hear of fellow baker's experiences. I vaguely remember reading in a book that a blistered crust can be achieved by adding water to it in the final stages of preparation. I was just wondering if this principle could be applied in other respects. thanks again! Nice hearing from you.


cheers!


Marie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

What if the dough were low salt and the water pockets were salt water?  Would that draw water to them?   I don't exactly know what you're after.  Anything is possible.   Edible is another thing. 


Have you thought of injecting pockets of liquid into the dough with a cooking needle?  Salty liquids could include soup, broth, mashed potatoes or other vegitables or fillings.   Olives could be filled and pressed into the dough.  Squash blossoms burried and then filled with a savory cream sauce is also an idea off the top of my head...  sort of a baked sandwich or roll...  would have to watch out for the pressure of the rising and expanding dough squishing the ingredients out.  Hummm.  Squash Blossom muffins...  !?!


Have fun,  Mini

Soundman's picture
Soundman

LOL!


David