The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Edo Bread's blog

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Nothing really special or adventurous here. Baked some seeded loaves and kept one for some cheese that I thought would be a perfect pairing (it was). As I sat down in the sunshine and took the first slice, I decided to take a picture to share or at least to serve a record for myself. 

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

I put a lot of energy into flavor and feel of my bread and usually it has a look that I am happy with too. But I really love seeing loaves that are decorative and have beautiful shapes. I am so often impressed with the loaves of people like Anna Giordan.

I had to make loaves for small table settings. Since it was the holidays I did a typical boule, but paired them with a wreath shape inspired by Anna's La Spiga Francese

These were made with 50% Rye starter, 50% wheat starter.  The dough was about 12% Rye, 12% whole wheat.

24 hours bulk ferment.  I increased my normal formula about 15% and then made two loaves, so they are a little smaller so that having both on the table was not overwhelming.

The wreath shape needs work, but as a pair they worked well. This was also a way to let those that love crust enjoy the wreath and plenty of crumb in the boule for those who prefer that.

 

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

These are the little loaves I have been baking for everybody leading up to the New Year. I decided to try one myself and got a crumb shot before it was all gone.

Everyone here knows the smiles and joy a fresh loaf can bring to on occasion. I wish I could try some of the amazing bread I see here on TFL. To all the wonderful people I have met here, happy baking, happy holidays and very happy New Year.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

This was an experimental loaf. As the weather gets cold I am testing time and temperature.

The idea here was to increase the ratio of rye starter to wheat starter to 2:1 - this was mostly to give it a stronger fuller flavor - that worked. I also let this bulk ferment for about 24 hours. The amount of time out of the fridge is the variable since "room temperature" is definitely different than it was a few months ago.

This formula is for one loaf but I continually get enough rise and spring to actually bake two good sized loaves.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Like others here I baked a few rounds of basic batards for use in stuffing and bread pudding.

They all used my wheat and rye starters and had a long fermentation. No pressure on these since they just cut all cut and set to dry for a couple days. Definitely improves the taste of things that requires some bread.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Had some pressure on this bake. This loaf was requested by my teenage girl for her high school leadership meeting. She likes this particular formula that uses equal parts of my wheat and rye starters.

It usually ends up being a nice big loaf with lots of flavor and it looks like this won't disappoint. It sang to me for the longest time after pulling it out of the oven. Wish I could go see the crumb, but that isn't going to get to happen. 

 

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Still doing some experiments with the new cloche.

This was a delicious loaf. Actually got a shot of the crumb so thought I would post. Nothing that special.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Nothing special about this loaf. It is what I bake about every other day. I did try a different score to see how it would look.  This had about 20 hours of cold fermentation and ended up very tasty.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

This used a mix of my two starters - wheat and rye. Pretty straight forward with some sunflower seeds added for crunchy deliciousness.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Not much to say about this one. Tasty and didn't last through the evening.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Edo Bread's blog