The Fresh Loaf

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tried Hammelman's 40% rye

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rubato456's picture
rubato456

tried Hammelman's 40% rye

i decided to try hammelman's 40% rye....i followed directions except i added about 100g of whole wheat bread flour as i had used up my first clear flour. i wonder how it will taste compared to greenstein's? i see the recipe only uses 2 tb of sourdough starter, compared to greenstein's 1 1/2 cups......i'm thinking greenstein's will be much more flavorful, but we'll see..

i'm wondering if i should have slashed the bread....i used the docking technique of poking in about 25 places.....but it seemed to tear a bit on one side. any suggestions? 

Hammelman's 40 % rye

 

Yikes....i just took the second hm 40 rye out of the oven and i didn't get anywhere near the oven spring that i got on the first one.......i'm thinking that by the time i was done baking the first one, the second one was overproofed.......but how do you deal w/ that problem?? i have a typical home oven, nothing fancy. i have one round la cloche and so i can only bake one loaf at a time. and my oven stone is round....a cheapy i got for 10 bucks at a home supply store. if i got a larger retangular stone...could i bake two at once....would i need to get two retangular cloches and that would be expensive...... any suggestions are appreciated. or maybe i should settle for baking one hugmoungous bread and then there isn't any issue of over proofing a second loaf.....

as for the taste, the hamelman is good, but it ain't greenstein's corn rye.....that is my winner between these two. 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

One round and one rectangle la cloche will usually fit into an oven together.  No real need to get two rectangle shapes.  Using the bottoms with the La Clouche's.   Hope this helps some.

 

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

You could always divide the recipe, shape them, then refrigerate one of them to retard it a bit, while proofing the other loaf as usual.  Then, maybe half-way through the proofing time, pull out the refrigerated loaf to allow it to hit room temp and finish proofing while the other one is finishing up and then being baked.  It'd probably take some trial and error to get the timing right, but other than that, I'd think that'd work.

'course, this is all assuming that recipe isn't retarded overnight (can't say I'm familiar with it, aside from seeing it's name pop up here from time to time).  If it is, then just leave the second loaf in the fridge for an 40 extra minutes (the baking time) while the other one is warming up and proofing.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

When I have more dough than will fit in one session, I refrigerate the excess for 30 minutes. That seems to slow it down enough so as not over proof and not really get cold enough to affect the baking. So it's divide, shape and chill half for 30 minutes only and proof the first loaf. After 30 minutes remove the second loaf about the same time the first loaf goes into the oven. I find the second is a little slower to proof up so maybe a shorter chill should be considered. Hope this helps.

Eric 

rubato456's picture
rubato456

thanks so much, the refrigeration would be the way to go. 

deborah

rubato456's picture
rubato456

i must say having the hamelman 40% rye this morning for breakfast, dipped in garlic infused olive oil, it really is very very good. the texture is incrediable. it's so moist, yet light, perfectly sour. of course, the greenstein's rye is long gone...so i can't do a side by side taste comparison....but i just wanted to post this note that the hamelman's really is very much worth baking. 

deborah