The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

my first try greenstein's corn rye

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rubato456's picture
rubato456

my first try greenstein's corn rye

it was hard to decide what rye bread i would try next.....i picked greenstein's corn rye.....here it is hot off the presses

greenstein's corn rye

greenstein's corn rye 

i actually got a huge amount of oven spring.....i had a hard time getting the dough out of the bowl and getting the layer of water poured off.....i had gone for a walk and got back later than i expected to and the dough seemed overproofed. when i removed it from the bowl it deflated rather awefully. but i dusted it in flour; (too much flour, but i was afraid i'd never get it out of the banneton, next time i'll use way less flour to dust) threw it into a banneton and then dumped the thing on a hot oven stone and slapped my cloche over top. at 10 minutes, i took off the cloche and was expecting a flat pancake only to see the bread rising up quite a bit........i was thrilled. i believe it got good gluten development this time....i tried to really be 'in tune' with the dough and how the gluten was developing. i knead by hand for about 15-20 minites i'd say, i really enjoyed the mess of this....and how the dough did shape up. i had a real crisis of faith to dump a layer of water over the thing.....but that's what david says he did.....so i did this too. i used whole grain rye flour, so it should have a rather good flavor. waiting till tomorrow will be hard.....

.i hope it tastes good....! i'll show crumb pix as soon as i get them 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Impressive looking loaf! Can't wait to see the crumb and your comments about flavor.

Eric 

rubato456's picture
rubato456

david was absolutely correct in how great this rye is! the taste is out of this world! so moist, great crust. it sure needs that long bake at lower temp. i think next time i will lower the temp a bit. david said to do 375 then lower to 350. i did 400 then lowered to 375 and then 350. the crust is a tad dry.....because this is not a tremendously large loaf. but it absolutely is a great tasting jewish rye. i've always dreamed of baking something like this, and now i have! here's the crumb pix:

 

greenstein sour corn rye crumbgreenstein sour corn rye crumb 

I immediately ordered greenstein's book from amazon. i'm that impressed....  

 

deborah

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Deborah.

Brave women!

This is a challenging bread, but worth learning to make.

As I recall, it is baked right after forming, without any proofing. So, why the banneton?

You were right to resist slicing it right away. If it was baked long enough, and you rested it overnight, hopefully the crumb won't gum up your knife.


David

rubato456's picture
rubato456

David: just to pretty it up i threw it in a banneton (i like those circular patterns it gives)....but i didn't proof at all. just dumped it right out onto the oven stone. the crumbs was wonderfully moist and not  at all gummy.   we waited until the next morning......the hungry clan has dispatched w/all but one tiny hunk of it. thanks so much for sharing your experience with this bread......it was of great help to me.

deborah