The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

So, I have this nice loaf of herbed sandwich bread...

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Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

So, I have this nice loaf of herbed sandwich bread...

I mean, it's really nice. It's the first loaf of bread that worked well for me. Mixed it up last night and let it rise once, and then I put it in the freezer overnight. Put it on my counter to defrost and rise a second time this afternoon until about an hour and a half ago, and then I shaped and let it proof. Put it in the oven and got nice oven spring. Good color, even, for a bread that's just flour, salt, yeast, and water.

But now the !@#% loaf won't come out of the pan.

It's a glass pan that I liberally oiled with some canola.

Why are things just not working for me today?


Got it out. This is the first one I have to be proud of. :) 

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

I am no bread expert, but I'm a chef. First problem in the glass. glass does not contract and expand as do metals. and they retain heat longer. perhaps (i dont know) you tried to unmiold before the bread was cool, not something you would have to do in metal(aluminum) wich would cool quickly. Then, if i am wrong, address the lubrication of the pan. the fine people in here have done that recently...give it a search

gavinc's picture
gavinc

picture of mine here from last weekend:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/27771627@N07/2839036977/

look for the pic with the pans on the right side of the picture next to the sourdoughs.

No oil necessary. 

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

Yeah. I wasn't aware that glass didn't let go like metal does...metal is all I've used. I borrowed the glass because I don't have a loaf pan right now and this is all my grandparents had.

The pan was very liberally coated with oil.  I had dumped too much in at the start, so I know that it was well coated.

I'll be going to commercial weight steel or aluminum soon. 

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

  • simple enough just use the aluminum pans (throw away) at any store, it's what i use :)
Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 slippery loaf does not make.   I oil (prefer something a little thicker like margarine) glass and glazed ceramics and dust it or flour it or crumb it or seed it or roll oat it, ...you get the picture. 

Mini O

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

  • Hi Mini O, dont know how to communicate in here other than this. I have seen your name on many threads. I worked for an Austrian trained chef for 3 years, he was the one that affirmed that I was good enough to become a Chef. You say you love chocolate. I posted a chocolate bread and hope to soon give a recipe. It's delightful!:) Happy
Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

to get my attention. Chocolate bread....looking forward to it. Where did you post it?

Hi Stephanie, Welcome to the site, not even here 3 days and your topic has been hijacked!  Hope you forgive us. 

Mini O

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

  • i addressed her problem, and i hope i helped :)

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

thin pans stick like crazy?  What do you do about it? 

Oh, and one has to scan the second page to notice I found your picture...  Do you have a crumb shot too?  You can add it to the other one. 

Mini O

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

  • I'll take one now OK LOL
Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

it's in the photo section...i have a few in there :) 

 

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

i took a new photo of the crumb, not sure where it ended up, it sucks to be computer illeterate

Happy-Batard's picture
Happy-Batard

ddi anyone find the pics yet?

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

I use pyrex loaf pans, simply because that's what I've collected over the years. Some hints re bread sticking...

> use a shortening (such as Crisco) rather than oil to grease the pans. Loaves do tend to stick to oiled pyrex pans.

> let the cooked loaf cool in the pan for a few minutes - it should shrink slightly from the sides of the pan as it cools (but you could still have problems if you used oil)

==========

This little recipe for a "mixture" for greasing loaf pans was posted on TFL a few years back. I tried it and, since I started using it, my loaves seldom stick - even when baked in pyrex pans

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup solid shortening (like Crisco) or lard - room temperature

1/2 cup any flavorless oil

1/2 cup white flour

INSTRUCTIONS

"cream" or whip the shortening until it is fluffy

add the oil gradually and then incorporate the flour

may be stored at room temperature

======

cordel's picture
cordel

Butter has the same properties as shortening, so for health reasons, I use unsalted butter on pans, glass or metal. By saving all my butter wrappers in the freezer, especially when making Christmas cookies, I almost always have one ready when I am baking. Non-stick sprays also work really well.

Jimeats's picture
Jimeats

I have never had a problem with a loaf sticking in a pan.

I use both a pyrex and metal pans and even a cast iron one on occasion.

Then again I never wash them either just wipe with a paper towel after use.

I do lightly grease the pans with either lard or crisco, I do prefer the lard. Jim

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

I prefer lard over Crisco also. I normally render my own lard, as long as I can get a sufficient quantity of unsalted pork fat trimmings at a reasonable price. Unlike commercial lard, home-rendered has no trans fats.

The recipe for the "no stick" greasing mixture works even better than lard or shortening for greasing bread pans. I make it with lard and, since home made lard can become rancid, store the mixture in a glass jar in the refrigerator. Lasts for months.

To give credit where credit is due, that recipe was originally posted to TFL by Mariana on October 22, 2007 at this link

 

 

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

the rule is symple  use a liqued fat like oil for cold things use a solid shortening for hot things like bread.

if the bread gets to cold before you try to take it out it will stick just warm it up for a minute and will come right out

remember solid fat for hot liqued fat for cold

the grease mix in a post above (schmere as we called it) was used in many bakeries i worked in.  it was great in cold weather since it wouls spread fast compaired to cold hard shortening. when you had to grease 100 pans easy th spread is what you wanted

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

Hi - I'm so glad to see you back on TFL as an active poster.

However, I'm confused by what you wrote. It seems as though you're recommending a *solid* fat for greasing pans for bread dough - am I right?

I know you're an experienced baker, so I'm happy to learn you've had a postive experience with Mariana's "schmere" grease mix. I didn't realize it was a formula that was used in professional bakeries but I certainly have found it works great for me.

 

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I'm loving every minute of this.  I'm so thankful for the people on this site.  I'm hoping that every loaf now looks like this.