The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

yorkshire puddings

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qahtan's picture
qahtan

yorkshire puddings

The batter for Yorkshire puddings...

Eggs, flour and water,

The baked Yorkshire puddings,,,, qahtan
weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I want to try that. What is the recipe and what does one do with Yorkshire Pudding besides beef?  They sure look like fun and tasty too.                              weavershouse

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Wow, perfect oven spring! Those look delicious, qahtan. In our family we stabbed a hole in the top and poured in the good beef gravy. Not very elegant but sooooooooo good. That was in the good old days when we still ate beef. Aren't they rather like popovers? As long as they don't have pepper in the mix they would be good with honey or other sweet stuff, A.

alconnell's picture
alconnell

Here's my recipe and we love 'em for breakfast:

3 eggs 450 degree oven
1 1/2 c. all-purpose flour 15 minutes
1 1/2 c. milk
1/2 tsp. salt 325 degree oven
1 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted 25-30 minutes

Makes 6 large popovers

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Grease popover pans generously. In mixing bowl, beat eggs slightly. Add remaining ingredients and beat with electric mixer until there are no lumps (but do not overbeat). Fill popover pans 3/4 full. Bake 15 minutes, reduce heat to 325 and bake 25 to 30 minutes more, or until golden brown. Serve immediately.

Popovers are tasty as they are, or can be served with jam. For a variation, try filling the popover pans with about two-thirds of the batter, then sprinkle shredded cheese in each and cover with remaining batter.

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 Never having knowingly made a pop over, but looking at your recipe and others I have googled Popovers are a bit different to Yorkshire pudding.

There are probably many that disagree with my recipe but I feel my pictures say it all, it works.

For my 6 fairly large puddings I used, almost as soon as I have had breakfast.

  2 large eggs right from the fridge

  1/3 cup flour, yesterday I used the same flour as I use for my bread

  and about 1/4 to 1/3 cup cold water right from the cold tap.

 Mixed all in a large bowl with balloon whisk, it's a job to get it to blend well. so I let it be a bit lumpy looking, mixture looks like heavy cream, sorta slow to pour.

this mix is then poured into a small jug, and the jug placed in the fridge, till I want to cook the pudding about 8 hours later.

I then heat my oven to 400f, spray my pans  with a quick spray of  Pam, place empty pans in oven to heat about 3/4 mins, remove pans from oven, divide the pudding mix into the hot pudding pans, place in oven and bake about 40 minutes, or until puffed and golden.

I do have a little story that goes along with Yorkshire puddings, I am a Londoner and these puddings are/were very popular when i was younger, My mum often made them

and it never failed when they were in the oven and you could see them rising, my mum would always say, "oh, I don't know whats happened to those Yorkshires," hence every one would look through the oven window and see all these gorgeous pudding

 puffing up like clouds. And strangely enough I seem to do the same as my mum always did........ :-))))  qahtan.  

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I was re reading your pop over post and notice you make the batter up 8 hours before you bake. Does the retarding change the outcome? I've always baked these immediately after mixing. Yours look so nice I thought I would ask as I am making them for my oldest daughter on request Sunday.


Thanks,


Eric

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I make Yorkshire pudding in a large glass baking dish. My family likes this so much that I can't remember any being left over. The whole pan full rises and browns up as a large hollow puff. We just butter it and eat. On a perfect day the pudding is baking while the rib roast is resting after roasting. (drooling here now).

Eric

alconnell's picture
alconnell

qahtan,

Being from this side of the pond, I was taught that Yorkshire Pudding was made along with a Roast Beef, pouring hot beef fat into a preheated pan, followed by the batter.  Have you ever made it that way?  We were told anything else was a popover.  I'm glad to hear a different version of that story!  And I will try your recipe because it sound lots easier and lower in fat. 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Mom was born in England and always made hers with the fat from the Prime Rib..just like you discribed..into the pre-heated pan..I remember everything had to be hot..I thought that was the whole purpose of Yorkshire Pudding was the beefy flavor served along side the roast dinner.  I've never made them but hers were beautiful and very tasty.


Sylvia

ehanner's picture
ehanner

My mother used to always make the pudding when she made a roast beef. She used a large glass baking pan with lots of hot melted butter in the bottom. Don't think she ever made pop overs. I use a 12 up medium muffin pan these days. They are more reliably puffy in the smaller individual pans.


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

We loved the flavor of the crispy fat though we never bought a roast that wasn't trimmed..I know fat sounds gross.  But we still love the crispy fat on leg o lamb, roast beef and yes even pork chops and bacon also a well marbled steak.  My mom and grandmother 'Mum' always used the muffin pans and made yorkshire pudding.  They sat up like big ballons very, very thin crusts.  I think the butter ones you are making sound delicious. I think you would also get a lovely nutty flavor.  Now I have read they have found out bacon fat has some of the good fats the same as Olive Oil.


Sylvia         

ejm's picture
ejm

I must say I'm amazed and impressed that your popovers popped so well, qahtan, considering that you used cold eggs and cold water. 

I didn't start making good popovers (we always called them Yorkshire puddings) every time until I ensured that all of the ingredients were at room temperature - except the oil, which must be very very hot.

The method I use (I learned it from my mom - who learned it from her mom, who learned it from her mom, etc. etc.)  is to put the fat (I use olive oil and butter; Mom always used the beef fat from the roast) into small pyrex bowls or muffin tins and put the bowls onto a jelly roll pan in a hot oven (425F). Then I beat the eggs very well - til  frothy and light coloured.  I then whisk in skim milk and salt. And then in small portions, I whisk in the flour just enough for the batter to be smooth and the consistency of heavy cream (the kind that can be whipped)

By this time, the oil in the pyrex bowls should be smoking hot. I CAREFULLY bring the tray out onto the counter and CLOSE the oven to retain the heat. Then quickly ladle the batter even into the bowls, filling only to half full. I love hearing the sizzle of the batter hitting the hot oil. Back into the oven for about 30 minutes.  No peeking; leave the oven door closed until the pudding is well puffed! Otherwise, the pudding will fall. It's safe to turn the tray around, to account for uneven oven heat, at about the 20 minute mark.

-Elizabeth

Here is our recipe: http://etherwork.net/recipes/yorkshire_pudding.html 

(I cannot believe that we've never taken photographs!) 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 Yes I use as I said cold eggs, cold water just as I said above. this is why I took a picture before and after baking, to show that it works.......

 I think every one has their own recipe, I know years ago I had roast beef and Yorkshire at my husbands aunt,  I don't know what she did to them but they were like small flat hockey pucks. ;-))  qahtan

qahtan's picture
qahtan

I think as I said earlier that every one has the on version of Yorkshire puds.


  This is the way I always do them, myself I am not keen on the one large pud that's


why I always do singles. In the old days yes it was common to cook the Yorkshire in the beef dripping, it does add that beefy flavour, but who these days buys a roast, whether prime rib or what ever cut you prefer with excess fat on it.


I use as I said a quick spray with Pam does a good job and less fat, not solid fat as beef fat.


Yes I always make mine with eggs from the fridge and water cold from the tap, always have, always the first thing I do in the morning if we are having Yorkshire pud that day one way or another.


 My mum liked them with currants in then and a sprinkle of sugar over top as a dessert. Daughter Karen likes hers after her dinner with just gravy over /in them,  that's how they should be eaten as a seperate item...


 I use  Yorshire not only to go with roast beef though, it goes well with Toad In The Hole, etc, if I can get some good sausages, or some times make my own. As my puds always seem to turn out OK and no one complains I stick with it. :-)))))


 Strangely enough this week I have done two lessons on how to make yorshire Pudding via email. giving details of each part of it. ;-))))


 My friend Erika even bought herself the same pan as I used.  And one guy I also "showed" just makes them and eats them as is........:-))))


 PS..... I am a Brit, :-)))))))  qahtan


 


 


 


 

ilovetodig's picture
ilovetodig

I fix a dish called Dutch Breakfast Pancake that is the same recipe as popovers but is cooked in a preheated, well-buttered pie plate.  We eat it with either butter and powdered sugar or syrup.  It is very delicious with bacon or sausage.