The Fresh Loaf

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Cooled just in time for bedtime snack

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Cooled just in time for bedtime snack

Nury's Light Rye


Nury's Light Rye


Nury's Light Rye Crumb


Nury's Light Rye Crumb

Mmmmmm .....

David

Comments

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

It's hard to stop making Nury's Light Rye isn't it? It's so delicious. Did you change the flours, it looks darker?                                                                   weavershouse

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Weavershouse. 

Yeah. It's hard to stop. Now, please explain why I would want to do that? LOL 

The bread looks darker for two reasons: First, when I tweaked it in Photoshop, the program picked up the light from the plate when correcting illumination. The bread ended up less well illuminated. Second, it is, in fact, really a bit darker, because I used whole rye instead of white rye. Good pick up! 

This is a bread I can make most days of the week, because you just need two 4 hour blocks of time on 2 consecutive days. That's the advantage of the overnight fermentation in the refrigerator and no need to proof the loaves. That makes it attractive beyond its other wonderfulnesses. 

David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

Lovely! I really should try doing some rye. I mean other than just adding some to me bread dough as I usually do.

Jane 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Jane. 

Thanks!  

This bread is one of my favorites. I have made it only 4 or 5 times, and this time was the best ever. It has helped me learn how to handle slack dough gently and to trust autolyse combined with periodic folding to develop gluten, instead of using heavy-handed kneading. 

I love rye breads, and I make them frequently. I grew up on Jewish sour rye, which is much lighter than the denser German ryes. I have developed a great liking for Nury's light rye, which is from the Auvergne, by the way. It is more like an Italian Ciabatta than any other French rye I've heard of. I saw on your blog you just made Mike Avery's sourdough Ciabatta. I think you would find handling Nury's rye similar in most ways. 

The other rye that comes to mind as closer than most to French breads is the "Light Silesian Rye" from Daniel Leader's "Local Breads." (This is the book from which the Nury rye also comes.) It does use some commercial yeast as well as a rye sour. I thought it might be too fluffy for my taste, but I really enjoyed it. It is similar to Jewish sour rye, but lighter in texture. 

Your French readers might find the Czech and Polish ryes in Leader's book interesting. They come from the original home of the poolish, after all. 

David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

David,

I've copied the recipe and I'll start it tomorrow. It looks like such a nice bread. When it says to  make the leaven with a firm starter, does that mean I make the firm starter, let it ferment, then the next day make the leaven for the bread? I don't get that part.

I don't have that book and I think my husband will have a fit if I buy one more book! I still have lots of recipes to go through with the ones I've bought. But everyone speaks well of Local Breads. I'll wait a couple mths.

Jane 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

When it says to  make the leaven with a firm starter, does that mean I make the firm starter, let it ferment, then the next day make the leaven for the bread?
 

Exactly right, Jane. 

David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

OK, done! I'll do the next step today. I made a white one and a rye so I can do a few things, like the essential again. I'll let you know how it goes.

Jane 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

OK, here's mine. It is undercooked and I'm thinking of sticking it back in when I do another bake in a few hours. It looked perfect when I pulled it out, crisp, etc, but I was busy doing other stuff and didn't really check it. When it cooled, it was more squishy and the bottom not browned. I don't have a stone yet. I should have turned it over and let it bake a bit more.

Light ryeLight rye

But other than that, I'm impressed with the size of the holes and the taste. The crumb is chewy. My husband is going to love this bread when I get it mastered. As a crust man, he won't have to pull out the crumb any more.

Thanks very much for the idea!

Jane 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Jane. 

You made some very nice loaves. I'm so glad you like it. I agree that the crust should be darker. I gave my last batch an extra 7 minutes in the turned-off oven after the bread was "fully baked." 

I didn't realize you don't have a stone. I am even more awestruck by the oven spring you get!  

Compared to ciabatta made with a biga, this bread stays moist an amazingly long time. Of course, with your household, you will just have to take my word for it! It also freezes very well and tastes fresh after thawing at room temperature. 

The crust softens fairly quickly. That's okay if you like chewy crust. If you want crisp crust, you have to eat it within a couple or three hours of when it comes out of the oven.

With all our frustrations duplicating eachother's breads with our different flours, I notice this American recipe for a French bread did work for you. Whew! I'm curious what wheat and what rye flours you used.

David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

It's pretty much all gone! I didn't get to rebake it. The little ones (2 and 3 yrs old) attacked it for their snack and then everyone else went through it at dinner. OK, next time I'll bake it longer. My potist (guy who makes pottery?) is making me a slab for my oven. It should be ready soon! I'm looking forward to trying pizzas.

I used whole wheat T150 and rye T110 which is a semi whole grain, I guess. But there really isn't much in it so it's like a rustic style pain de campagne, really.

Whatever it is, it WORKED and it's GOOD!

Jane 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Jane. 

I gather the bread passed the toddler test with flying colors. You must have hidden some so the rest of your family could get a taste.  

Your photo of the crumb sure doesn't look like a bread with mostly whole wheat, although I see some flecks of bran. Is T150 made with white whole wheat? I would never have thought of making this bread with whole wheat. Hmmmm ..... 

I just bought 5 pounds of King Arthur White Whole Wheat flour, but I haven't made any bread with it yet. It has 13% protein. (Red whole wheat has 14%.)

David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

The recipe I followed had a firm starter (I made it with rye) that was made into another firm starter, made with white and whole wheat. Then the dough has white flour and rye. There's only a tiny bit of whole wheat actually. 

I've got another one going but since it's Wednesday I'm in an out all day and it is already in the fridge, so it won't be following the same "recipe".

Jane 

 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Those are beauties! Since you love rye..I was wondering if you have made Swedish rye? Not as rustic, a lighter bread, but aromatic with orange zest and caraway or anise.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Paddyscake. 

Thanks! 

No, I haven't made Swedish rye, although I have several recipes in various books. I really should give it a try ... Soon, since we are at the very tail end of the local orange season. 

David

Digger57's picture
Digger57

The Great use of grains is bread making. OH YA!!

What a wonderful looking bread David. Do you happen to have this recipe to post so I can copy and try myself. Again I hope I can make some as wonderful as yours. Digger57

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Zolablue turned me onto this bread back in January, 2008. She posted the recipe in her blog. Follow this link:  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5500/pierre-nury’s-rustic-light-rye-leader   David

ehanner's picture
ehanner

David,
I've promised myself I would make this bread every time I see it posted. The crust looks so tasty. I have a question on how you shape this. Reading the recipe post from ZB it sounds like she doesn't do anything to effect the shape other than stretch and place the dough. Yours and hers have a more refined look. Are you doing anything to tension them?

Eric

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I give them a harsh look?
David

Janedo's picture
Janedo

Oh yah, that works!

Or you can just cut them and set them on the sheet and hope for the best. I've had a lot of success with this method.

No, really Eric, it just comes out that way, that's why rustic style breads are so great! You can let go of scoring stress and perfectionism.

Try them, you'll love them. We'll be finishing off the second batch tonight for dinner.

Jane 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Eric. Sorry for the very short reply before. At the time, my wife was sitting in the car waiting to leave for the airport. Talk about tension! In fact, I did minimal shaping besides stretching the cut pieces of dough. I tucked the ends under to give a more rounded end. That's it.  David